DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor

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"How corrosion inhibitors protect metal: synthesis in  
the lab and testing"
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpRrP3sqQLw
(23:01)


This video isn't really about DeOxit but does offer a good clue as to
the formulation and how it works.  The video does a better job of
explaining what's happening than I could, so I won't repeat much of
its contents.  

He mentions that his inspiration came from this patent:
"Corrosion inhibited lubricant composition"
<https://patents.google.com/patent/US4193882

Note that Camolin Red, the predecessor of DeOxit, shows 5% oleic acid
and 95% "volatile hydrocarbons and propellant".  I had been assuming
that the hydrocarbons were just mineral oil or something similar.
Apparently not.  I'm also assuming that the steel corrosion protection
that DeOxit shows in the video, also applies to copper wire and silver
plated contacts.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
It's like 2:00 AM and I can't play videos right now because every time I do
 they come up with a big BOOM and I am waiting for it to happen and the oth
ers come and say "Did you blow off a gun in the house ?". One time I plugge
d in a preamp that had DC on the output and when I switched to it the thud  
was like, you would think like maybe a big bookshelf got tipped on the floo
r or some shit.  

Anyway, what makes Deoxit Deoxit is the reducer. It is a very small part of
 the contents but the part that really does the work. I do not know which c
omponent it is. It actually takes the oxygen out of the metal.  

Now if you can get that stuff to forever be on the metal I imagine it would
 be really protected. Some sort of non-volatile grease, but I don't know if
 it is oil soluble.  

If I were so inclined I would do a little research and find out exactly how
 a reducer works, what they are, their properties and all that but rally, I
 have enough going on. There has to be someone around here who knows more.  
If not maybe we have to go find somewhere else.

Yeah I am interested but I am not willing to spend a week on it.

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
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Cramolin Red did not first come in spray. Just like 100% Deoxit D100. I'll
look at that video, but can't on this old tablet.

Greg

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
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In watching the video, I was wondering how the Rtv acedic acid reacted with
steel. I coated and removed cured rtv from copper sheet, no corrosion.

Whatever it was, I removed old NOS stuff like silver plated switches.
Around the switch was a piece of paper looking sheet. One side said towards
part. Any part sticking out of paper had turned black. I still have some
pads to stick inside sensitive equipment said to protect. Never tried them.

Greg

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
In article < snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-
september.org>, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...
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There are several types of RTV.  Some have the acedic acid and eats  
copper, and some does not have the acid and is fone with copper.


Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
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I used acedic type. I don't know what remnants remain. The smell goes away.

Greg

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
Yes.  
BTW, I?m one of many, many stupid, slow, never-should-have-been-all
owed-into-college liberal arts majors. Also, I?m a former east-coas
t union electrician helper. So you?ll have to excuse me when I ask  
you: what does ?acedic? mean?

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
On 2019/06/28 2:55 p.m., snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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-allowed-into-college liberal arts majors. Also, I?m a former eas
t-coast union electrician helper. So you?ll have to excuse me whe
n I ask you: what does ?acedic? mean?
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Acidic - vinegar based solvent. It was miss-speled.

John ;-#)#

--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
                      John's Jukes Ltd.
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Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
On Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 4:14:18 AM UTC-4, GS wrote:

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ds
m.

"Silver Paper" has been around since the 1800s, invented/developed in Engla
nd when burning high-sulphur coal was common both for heat and for "town ga
s" that powered street lights. In that environment the "Plate" would tarnis
h almost overnight, requiring dedicated servants for its maintenance.  

Still around today:

https://www.amazon.com/3M-Anti-Tarnish-Silver-Protector-Strips/dp/B00O89A21
Q  

As a related 'aside', fine silver is much more resistant to tarnish than St
erling or Plate-silver. So drinking vessels and those made to serve food ty
pically had a fine-silver wash on the contact surface.  

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA  


Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
wrote:

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"Can acetic acid dissolve steel?"
<https://www.quora.com/Can-acetic-acid-dissolve-steel

"What are the products of acetic acid and copper?"
<https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-products-of-acetic-acid-and-copper

Any mild acid (including oleic acid) will remove the oxide layer from
copper.  However, if left on the copper contacts, it will eventually
corrode the copper.  This is the label from a bottle of Cramolin red,
from when it contained oleic acid:
<http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/Cramolin%20R-100L/index.html>
  "Wipe off excess with a lint-free cloth or swab."

Ancient Cramolin R100L MSDS data:
<http://store.caig.com/core/media/media.nl?id80%8&cAC%CT113328&h=3f8d8512c835e9a69f64&whence=
Mentions "mineral oil" twice.

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That's tarnish (sulfur compounds).  Some clues from how to clean brass
clock mechanisms:
<https://www.snclocks.com/TechnicalInformation/Tid-Bits/Clock-Cleaning-Solution/

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor
On 6/20/2019 5:20 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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  All very interesting and ties into my latest purchase. I bought a  
metal brake to bend flashing in my house. It came coated in oil, which I  
removed just by wiping with a paper towel, because it was so messy.  
Within two days in my screened porch it started to rust. So while I'm  
not using it, I used motor oil on a paper towel to re-oil the metal  
surfaces.
  This will be a rarely used tool, and will be stored in my non-climate  
controlled outdoor shed.

  How do I best protect the surface

Ditto, my new drill press!.

                                        Mikek

Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor

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Motor oil might work.  I've never tried it.  I use automotive grease
on my drill press.  Just about any grease or liquid wax that doesn't
run, melt, or wash off should work.  I've also used liquid furniture
wax.  

There are a wide variety of marine corrosion protection sprays and
pastes available.
<https://www.theruststore.com/Protect-Your-Boat-from-Rust-W39.aspx
<https://www.theruststore.com/Rust-Prevention-C4.aspx

Also, automotive rust inhibitors:
<https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-heavy-duty-anti-rust-in-amber.html

WD-40 Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor:
<https://www.wd40specialist.com/products/corrosion-inhibitor/
<https://antonpug.com/blog/2015/5/11/diy-rust-protection-test

You might search or ask the same question on:
<https://www.cnczone.com/forums/
The forum is mostly about CNC machines, but also covers other aspects
of machining.  For example:
<https://www.cnczone.com/forums/benchtop-machines/86146-rust-prevention.html



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: DeOxit as a corrosion inhibitor

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Rust is caused by oxygen and an electrolyte, which is usually water.  

To keep oxygen and water away from the metal, cover the bare metal
surfaces with something so that the oxygen and water do not come into
contact with the metal. On a tool where the bare metal surfaces need
to stay bare, paint will not work. A layer of oil is often a good
option. Oil evaporates slowly, clings well to the metal and is
relatively easy to wipe off before use.

With metal objects that are kept at outdoor temperature, condensation
is the main problem (unless you leave it out in the rain). Metal has a
relatively high heat capacity, so when the weather changes from cold
and dry to warm and humid, the metal stays cold for a while, causing
condensation. If you can keep your tool slightly warmer than the
outside air, you will greatly reduce condensation and therefore
rusting. You don't need climate control. You only need to keep it
somewhat warm.
--  
RoRo

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