Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr

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QUESTION 1:
I have several devices that have battery (alkaline AA or AAA) contacts  
that regularly get resistive.  Opening the device and spinning the  
batteries usually solves it but only for a day or so.

What is available to coat the device contacts to prevent the constant  
opening and battery spinning ?

These contacts are usually way down inside the device and are not all  
that easy to get to.

QUESTION 2: is there a AA and AAA battery that is less likely to leak  
all over and destroy my devices ?  Yeah I know, take the batteries out  
BUT not always remembered !  So please do not annoy me with that  
recommendations.

I have brand new, never used AA and AAA batteries that leaked.  These  
are many years before the printed good by date.  What total crap.
I have no-name batteries that never leak.
The one that leak are Duracell and Costco brand name batteries.

QUESTION 3:
Now that contacts have been destroyed by leaking batteries, what is the  
best procedure to get the contacts working again?
The contacts are deep inside and I cannot take the device apart.
I cannot buy a new device because in some cases they are not available  
or are now too expensive to buy.



Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On 6/4/2017 7:30 AM, BatteryUser wrote:
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In my home, Duracell is permanently prohibited.  I have had too many
devices destroyed by leaking Duracell batteries.

--  
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com

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Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Sun, 4 Jun 2017 07:48:29 -0700, "David E. Ross"

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I've had them all leak.  The solution is to keep batteries fresh.  If
we have a power outage and flashlights get used, I change all the
batteries, whether they need it or not.  Remotes get their batteries
changed at least once a year and other devices are left without
batteries in them or, sometimes, a slip of paper between the contact
and the battery.  Alkalines leak when they're discharged, so don't let
that happen.  BTW, Duracells are about all I use anymore.  They're
somewhat cheaper than Everready's and just as good.

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
David E. Ross wrote on 6/4/2017 10:48 AM:
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So now you let other brands leak in your devices?

One good thing about Duracell is their guarantee.  I had a radio controlled  
clock that was ruined by leaking Duracells and they sent me a $100 check to  
cover the cost!  All I had to do was call.

I'm pretty sure the batteries didn't run down before they leaked as I would  
have noticed the clock wasn't working.

--  

Rick C

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On 04/06/2017 15:48, David E. Ross wrote:
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Same here. Duracell = rubbish.

There are also a little bigger than the correct size for AA and will jam  
in some devices that will take any other AA battery without problems.

--  

Brian Gregory (in the UK).
To email me please remove all the letter vee from my email address.

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Sun, 4 Jun 2017 20:29:25 +0100, Brian Gregory wrote:

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The LSD NiMH from Aldidl and 7dayshop are a tad big - IME they go in but can
be difficult to get out where they slide in axially.
Eneloop are OK for size, but I don't know if the other 'good' makes are.
--  
Peter.
The gods will stay away  
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Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
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I'm not aware of anything; IME, tinning with solder is often beneficial,  
but of course not practical if they're inaccessible.

Automotive use sometimes uses some sort of jelly-like substance around  
the battery terminals - my memory's telling me Vaseline or petroleum  
jelly (are those the same thing?), but my memory needs needs a new  
battery ... (-:
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I don't _think_ I've ever had a rechargeable cell leak, at least  
anything corrosive - at least not since NiMHs. (Of which I now only buy  
the ones that hold their charge: they tend to only be available in about  
80% the capacity [2.5 rather than 2.9 Ah for AA, 3/4 rather than 1 Ah  
for AAA], but I don't have to worry about whether they're charged when I  
need them.)

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As someone else has said, alkalines leak when discharged. (I've had zinc  
ones go off even when unused, but even if I had a need for primary  
cells, I don't think I'd buy zinc.)

The one time I've seen actual capacities quoted for primary cells (in a  
Farnell catalogue: that's the same company as something beginning with H  
in the US), Duracells _were_ the highest capacity, but only by about  
10%; given the amount of advertising they do, which you usually pay for  
in the price, I'd not normally buy them - if I had to buy primary cells,  
I'd buy own-brand (but alkalines), since the variation isn't great.
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If  unavailable, i. e. obsolete, you have nothing to lose guarantee-wise  
by breaking into the device.
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--  
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

age. fac ut gaudeam.

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote on 6/4/2017 11:54 AM:
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Yes, they are the same thing.  I've heard of that being slathered over the  
starting battery terminals, but I wouldn't use it on anything else, at least  
not any electronics.  On a car battery the protection is from the  
unavoidable small amount of battery acid leaked in operation.  Other places  
in the car don't have that problem and you don't want petroleum jelly  
melting into stuff where you didn't intend it.


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I think you will find Duracells are priced competatively if you shop around.  
  Here Costco has good prices on Duracells, but they have their own brand  
which is even cheaper.  A number of reviews have been done and they show the  
Costco brand to be just as good as the Duracells and in fact, the found tiny  
dimples on the Costco brand cells that are only found on a type of Duracell  
(one that isn't their cheapest cells).

Reviews (tests) have shown the Sunshine brand from Dollar Tree (a store  
where "Everything is a Dollar") are just as good as well and even cheaper  
than the Costco brand at 4 for $1.

Costco has great prices on hearing aid batteries too.  Cheaper than any  
other prices I have found.

--  

Rick C

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr

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Because they look the same, and may even be made in the same factory,
doesn't mean they are the same.
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The warranty is worth something, though I've only used it once.

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Not surprising.  This is the sort of thing shopping clubs are good at.

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
BatteryUser wrote:
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There is much misinformation floating about the concept of 'dielectric  
greases' as 'dielectric' implies non-conducting rather than conducting.

There is a problem with conducting greases, because you would need for  
the metal in the grease to match the metal in the contacts or there will  
be more problem rather than less.

Somewhat interesting article here  
https://www.w8ji.com/dielectric_grease_vs_conductive_grease.htm
Dielectric Grease vs Conductive Grease

--  
Mike Easter

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
wrote:

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The idea isn't that the grease is conductive (it's not), rather than
it will aid in creating a "gas-tight" contact, reducing oxidation. The
contacts wipe through the grease but it piles up around the contacts,
keeping air and water from the contacts.

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Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Sunday, June 4, 2017 at 5:22:54 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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And that's your answer.

Back in the 70s, Ford USA used to pump their electrical under hood connecti
ons chock full with a brownish thin grease (like lithium only not white).  
Not only air tight and moisture proof, but water proof as well.  

The metals *will* make contact through any weight grease you can get betwee
n the battery and the contact, but will deny air and moisture from the cont
acts.

As for damaged contacts, the best solution is to remove, strip, and replate
 them.  Of course, this is more work than most items deserve.  What I do is
 run a wire brush on a Dremel and remove as much crap and remaining plating
 as I can. Add good flux and flow solder onto the contact.  The solder plat
ing will work fine for the most part as long as you keep a bit of grease be
tween it and the battery.

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Sun, 4 Jun 2017 07:30:02 -0700, BatteryUser

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<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaline_battery#Leaks
<http://modernsurvivalblog.com/preps/battery-corrosion-why-they-leak-and-how-to-prevent-it/

What has happened is that the alkaline electrolyte (potassium
hydroxide) attacks the tin or chrome plating on the spring connectors.
The connectors are made from spring steel, plated with copper, nickel
and either chrome or tin (if it needs to be soldered).  Oxides of
these metals make for lousy electrical connections.  

The problem is that you're not going to improve the connection between
steel (rust) and the battery terminal (stainless steel) with any kind
of "contact enhancer" or magic elixir.  Even replating the spring
clips doesn't help if there is a liquid electrolyte or caustic agent
present.  The trick is to keep the contacts dry so that there's no
electrolysis possible.  That's unlikely with unsealed portable
devices.  I've had some luck spot welding small squares of stainless
steel shim stock onto the spring terminals, but that requires total
disassembly of the device, which is not always possible or convenient.
It also hardens the spring steel, causing the spring eventually break.

My experience with various "dielectric greases" and "contact
enhancers" have been dismal.  Most do an excellent job of trapping
small amounts of electrolyte in the grease so that it can continue to
do damage.  The best I've been able to do is seal the alkaline battery
with thin RTV at the junction of the battery contacts and the case.
That also plugs up the overpressure valve.  Fortunately, alkaline
batteries only belch gas at EOL (end of life) which is a tolerable
indication that it's time to replace the cells.  

I have a few suggestions on how to minimize the damage caused by
alkaline batteries, but in the end, the only solution is to avoid
using alkaline batteries.  I've been switching to LSD (low self
discharge) NiMH cells such as Eneloop, and LiIon where possible.  I've
had the older type of NiMH cells leak.  However, Eneloops can be made
to leak, usually by overcharging:
<http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?180661-NiMH-leakage-Does-it-happen&p32%59769&viewfull=1#post3259769
None of my LiIon cells have leaked yet.  If your device will handle
NiMH cells, do it.  If your device can handle LiIon, even better.

Unfortunately, that won't help if your battery contacts have already
had the tin or chrome contact layers removed by corrosion.  Replacing
the contacts might be possible.  Repairing them with replating is too
much work.  Spot welding or soldering some pieces of metal to the
sprint clip is ugly, but does work.  Leaving the corroded contact
metal exposed, especially if the battery compartment hasn't been
thoroughly cleaned is guaranteed to recreate your intermittent
connection problem.  

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All the alkalines I've used leak.  Some leak in the original
packaging.
<
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/Kirkland-AAA-leak.jpg

Other alkalines perfer to leak where they can do the most damage:
<
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/maglites.jpg


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That's also been my experience.  Oddly, Costco Kirkland batteries
didn't leak very much and had a much longer shelf life until after
Costco started putting highly visible expiration dates on their bubble
pack packages.  My conspiracy theory is that they did something to
REDUCE the shelf life of their cells.

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I tried to answer that under your first question.  Basically, you
either provide a better connection by replacing, replating, or
augmenting the contacts, or you'll have continuous bad connections. If
you want a short cut, try welding nickel strips to the terminals of
your battery and bypass the spring contacts completely.  It will be
rather awkward having to weld nickel strips onto your alkaline
batteries when they are replaced, but that's the price of not having
to replace the spring contacts.  Switching to LSD NiMH will help
reduce the leaks, but won't fix the intermittent connection problem.



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
So you are saying that brand new batteries that still have many years  
left on their printed cover are at end of life ?

I thought that Durcell stopped with the warranty protection.
It leaks in an expensive gizmo and that is that.

I will try Panasonic batteries next buy.


Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
BatteryUser wrote on 6/6/2017 4:59 PM:
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https://www.duracell.com/en-us/technology/battery-care-use-and-disposal/

It is still in place.  It may not be as easy to use as it was.  When I made  
my claim I just called them and they asked me the expiration date on the  
battery.  They sent me a check for $100.  Now the web page says you need to  
ship the batteries and product to them.

--  

Rick C

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Tue, 6 Jun 2017 13:59:20 -0700, BatteryUser

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When you start out a post with "so you are saying...", it would be
good to include something of what was said.

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Just change them often and *never* leave a dead battery in any
appliance.  If it's something that's only used occasionally, like an
emergency flashlight, replace the batteries after every use.  
  

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
Everything here is about right.  Use Duracell or Rayovac for the warranty.  Duracell will be a little hard to execute.

Do not leave batteries in a device.

I've never used dialectic grease on battery contacts.  Your best defense is keeping them clean and dry.

I just experienced my weirdest failure of a drugstore branded (CVS) battery.   The negative contact domed inward in a Maglite flashlight.  The most stupidest failure ever.

Rust and oxides don;t conduct well.  Sorry.

This stuff: http://www.cool-amp.com/new_site/product%20info/CL%20Spec%20Sheet.pdf isn't anywhere near cheap, but it does enhance contacts

Dialectic grease keeps the water out.  Keeping the leaking battery insides away is more difficult.


Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
On Tue, 6 Jun 2017 13:59:20 -0700, BatteryUser

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I guess you mean this:
<
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/Kirkland-AAA-leak.jpg

The expiration data on the package is 2014.  I took the photo in Oct
2016, 2.8 years after the batteries expired.  I don't recall when I
bought the batteries, but based on my typical consumption rate of AA
and AAA alkalines, I would guess 2009.  I would expect that such
batteries should gracefully lose some percentage of their rated
capacity after the expiration date, and not belch electrolyte all over
the package and whatever they're powering.

Note that this problem is not unique or unusual:
<http://www.paulallenengineering.com/blog/kirkland-signature-alkaline-batteries
Read through the first few reader comments on Duracell and Kirkland
batteries.

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It's my understanding that the warranty is still in place, but that
it's more difficult to obtain compensation for damage.

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I guess you didn't read my rant upon which you're commenting.  I don't
think you're going to find any alkaline battery, from any
manufacturer, that does not leak.  I suggest you switch to
rechargeable LSD NiMH, which also leak, but leak less.  Or, if
possible, but devices powered by LiIon batteries, which leak and self
discharge even less than NiMH and alkaline.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
Jeff Liebermann wrote on 6/6/2017 11:31 PM:
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I'm surprised that you would not see the problem here.  If you bought milk  
with an expiration date of Tuesday, would you complain that the milk went  
sour on the Friday after?  Batteries contain corrosive chemicals and are  
guarantied to leak if you let them sit long enough.  Two years past  
expiration date doesn't sound like a lot, but you can't say it is the  
battery's fault.

BTW, if you check around you will find dated alkaline batteries are  
typically dated for a 10 year shelf life.  So you likely bought that pack in  
2004 or 2005.  The article you cite talks about 2024 dated batteries and the  
article date is 2014.


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I see a lot of applesauce.  "Duracell "AA" and "AAA" alkaline batteries  
consistently leak at a 20 - 30% failure rate from packages no older than 4  
months."  So if I buy a pack of 48 cells, I should see leakage in 10 of them  
in 4 months?  I've never seen a Kirkland cell leak and I've bought some half  
dozen packs, not counting the 9 volt batteries.


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I think the only way to tell is to try.  Did you contact Duracell about any  
leaking cells?


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The issue is not leakage, but premature leakage.  I've had two devices  
impacted by leaking alkaline batteries.  One was clearly not left in a  
device past it's date because it was a clock that ran until the battery  
failed and the cell was dated so Duracell paid for it.  I don't recall the  
other so much.  It was a much less expensive item and the battery was a  
Rayovac.  Their warranty required the return of the clock to them for  
examination and possible repair.

--  

Rick C

Re: Contact Enhancer, Battery Mfr
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silver, or nickel is probably your best bet, could be tricky to apply.

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Energiser has $10000 product damage guarantee, won't save your device
but will replace it.

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yeah, Duracell are poor quality.

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Best procedure is take it apart, clean throughly and replace the contacts.  
see you-tube for dissassembly instructions.

--  
This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software  

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