0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........

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There are some sellers on ebay who are selling assorted resistors in
quantity. Some of them claim these assortments contain 0 ohm
resistors....  WTF. Wouldn't that be a piece of wire?  

What would be the point of that?

How would you even color code it?  


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On 3/9/2017 6:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com wrote:
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used as jumpers when you don't have enough pcb layers.

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
Also designed for component insertion machines which can't really handle bare wire.

Dan

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Can be used as "ID" links to enable/disable features on different runs  
of a board.


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Thu, 9 Mar 2017 19:04:45 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
wrote:

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So these things really *DO* exist???  
I thought it was either a typo, or the webpage was made up by someone
who was clueless about electronics.  

That seerms pretty goofy, but I do imagine some machines cant handle the
bare wires.....

I'm guessing they are just a piece of solid wire with a "shell" around
it.  

Now, assuming they use a color code on them, what would it be?
I thought it would be Black - Black - Black, but that is actually ONE
OHM. (I always have a hard time comprehending that one).

So I cant imagine how to color code ZERO Ohms...  


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Friday, March 10, 2017 at 1:20:22 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com wrote:

[about zero-ohm resistors]

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One black band around the middle is a common marking.

<http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/yageo/ZOR-25-R-52-0R/0.0QTR-ND/18795>

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
Please note that there are SMD versions of these as well.  They will be marked with a single zero(0).

You will often see these used to jump a trace in SMD applications.

Dan

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
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    I have seen thee or four zeros, depending on the tolerance. They  
were 5% and 1%. We used them on circuit boards when a pad wasn't needed.


    I see that they now sell 0.05% as well:


<http://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Resistors/SMD-Resistors-Chip-Resistors/_/N-7h7yu?P=1z0x6qj>


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--  
Never piss off an Engineer!

They don't get mad.

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Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com says...
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SMD is surface mounted device.  For resistors and capacitors they are  
usually small and flat.  They are usually  silver colored on the ends.  
That is there you solder them to the circuit board.  The ICs will often  
have what seems like very short leads.  They lay flat on the circuit  
board also.

Check out this youtube video as to what they are and ways to work with  
them.    For very much work it helps to have a good 10 to 20 power  
stereo microscope.




Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Sat, 11 Mar 2017 16:15:51 -0500, Ralph Mowery

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Now that I know what the initials mean, I know what these are. I have
seen them. As far as I'm concerned, they are the devices which cant not
be repaired, unless the whole boards are replaced. Yes, i am sure they
can be repaired, but it wont be me working on them. Poor eyesite is just
part of the reason. Thats why I prefer the old tube stuff to work on, or
at least the early transistorized stuff on single layer boards, which
contain parts that can be touched without using a tweezers....

For me, IC chips and SMDs took the fun out of electronics as a hobby...
(Not that they are bad, but they are not for the home workshop, they are
made for robots in factories that create them, and people who have very
expensive test gear to trace them). I still recall trying to unsolder
some IC chips, and ruining them every time. Then spending days or weeks
trying to locate replacement parts, because they are factory numbers
that cant just simply be purchased.


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com says...
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I am 67 and just started working with the SMD about 2 years ago.  If  
your hands do not shake too much it is easy if you have the right tools.  
For the hobby people like me that does not want to spend too much, it  
takes about 300 to 350 to really get the right equipment.  A good  
microscope can be bought for about $ 190.  A hot air and small soldering  
iron combination is about $ 60.  Then a few tweezers, very fine  
solder,liquid solder, liquid flux and some kapton tape round up most of  
the other items you need.  Get some old computer boards and practice for  
several days and it will be easy.  Be sure to look on youtube for some  
videos to see how the pros do it.  They make it look very easy.


One easy way to replace the ICs is to cut the legs from the plastic case  
and remove them a pin at a time.  Don't try to save them.  

The odd ball factory numbers are something else.  There should be some  
kind of rule they can not use house numbered parts unless it is  
especially made for that piece of equipment and not used by anyother  
company.
Some companies even sanded off all the numbers on the parts.


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Saturday, March 11, 2017 at 8:34:48 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:
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Probably getting a bit off topic, but when removing SMD parts, I use ChipQuik.  Check it out, it works great and the removed part can be used again if it is not the problem.

Dan

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........

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I use a modeller's pencil blowtorch to heat the bare side of the board -  
when any SMD part moves; I tap the edge of the board on the bench and a  
whole pile of parts just fall off.  


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Sat, 11 Mar 2017 20:34:47 -0500, Ralph Mowery

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The old tube stuff was made to be repaired. You'd unplug a tube and
stick it in a tester. If it was not the tubes, you'd begin checking the
passive parts.

With ICs, you cant unplug them or test them. They DO make sockets for
them, but they are never used on consumer products, and if they could be
unplugged, there are no testers, at least not a general purpose tester
for all ICs. I suppose companies have testers for specific ICs that they
use. Cutting the leads on the ICs is a good idea if you know they need
to be replaced, but much of the time you want to remove them to test
them (as best as possible) out of the circuit.  

At least single transistors could be unsoldered and tested. When I used
them for some projects that I built, I always put them in sockets.  

Things just are not made to be repaired these days. And like you said,
the part numbers are often "house numbers", which makes it impossible to
fix the stuff. I guess thats why computers are made wih boards that are
just unplugged and replaced. The boards themselves are the components,
but often times the boards cost more than the whole device.



Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com says...
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There's also the problem that at the speeds stuff works at these days,  
the extra spacing is electrically significant.

I remember playing with a tunnel diode in the 1960s when they were  
commercially available and they were quite difficult to stop  
oscillating!

Mike.

Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Sun, 12 Mar 2017, MJC wrote:

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I think that accounts for why in hobby circles, their attraction was  
mostly as an oscillator.  "WIreless mics", QRP transmitters on the amateur  
six metre band, oscillator/mixer in various receiver circuits.  Offhand, I  
can't remember much of their use as amplifiers in hobby circles.

    Michael


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........

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The hobby magazines of that era were full of TD bugs.  


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com wrote:
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 > layer boards, which contain parts that can be touched without using a
 > tweezers....
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 > workshop, they are made for robots in factories that create them, and
 > people who have very expensive test gear to trace them). I still
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    SMD is easier to work with than old point to point wired chassis. I  
am in my mid 60s, and I have had poor eyesight all my life. I worked  
with SMD boards daily at Microdyne. I now have a nice B&L Stereozoom 4  
boom microscope for my projects now that I'm retired. I purchased an  
adapter to be able to record video from the microscope, so that I can  
post video of the techniques I use.

    You need the right tools and some practice to work with the small  
parts. I routinely removed and replaced 288 pin ICs without damaging the  
PCB or to IC.

    ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) are what you  
referred to as "can't just simply be purchased". They only make sense  
for products built by the millions, or for unlimited budget high end  
industrial electronics.

    A lot of what you think are unavailable is because you don't know  
actual part numbers, VS what they have room to mare a component with.


--  
Never piss off an Engineer!

They don't get mad.

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Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........

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They occasionally double as test points on SMD boards.  


Re: 0 (ZERO) Ohm Resistors (WTF)........
On Fri, 10 Mar 2017 03:19:06 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com wrote:

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One ohm is brown, black, gold.

Zero ohm should be black, black, any.
--  
RoRo

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