XML Book

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
Hi all,

Can anyone suggest which book is the best reference for XML from an
embedded view point.

Thanks
Eoin


Re: XML Book
Hi all,

Can anyone suggest which book is the best reference for XML from an
embedded view point.

Thanks
Eoin


Re: XML Book


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Could you or someone suggest a way in which XML might be
relevant to embedded systems at all?

- FChE

Re: XML Book

Quoted text here. Click to load it

An RTOS spec (ARINC-653) used for many embedded avionics systems specifies
the use of XML to define and verify the partition timing and generate the
partition configuration tables.  The spec includes the XML schema and
example instances.

Relevance is still a valid argument though as the spec notes that a program
will need to be written to convert the XML data to something usable by the
compiler.

--
Scott
Validated Software Corp.



Re: XML Book
On 09 Aug 2005 10:20:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@redhat.com (Frank Ch. Eigler)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Setting / exporting  Configuration options in an embedded device. If
XML is used in stead of something else, then the possibility of using
other software to manipulate or generate data in a compatible format
is much easier.
Now if I could only get an XML parser small enough to be usefull in
something like an AVR. The "small" XML parsers I have seen might be
small at a couple of 100K bytes when running on a PC with megabytes of
memory, but on most embedded systems I use, I need something
preferably less than 1K bytes.

Regards
  Anton Erasmus



Re: XML Book
Thanks ,

Wrox press books are usually pretty good. I sort of agree with the
argument about why would anyone bother to use XML in embedded systems
in particular. If you want to integrate your system in to a distibuted
network XML is the way. My application is basically a data collection
device which can talk to servers/clients over tcp/ip. It needs to be
able to share data easily with custom and eventually, 3rd party
applications. XML makes it easy for other systems to use the data /
display it. Have a look at
http://www.embedded.com/story/OEG20020212S0032


Re: XML Book
On Tue, 09 Aug 2005 21:55:47 +0200, Anton Erasmus

Quoted text here. Click to load it

We're going through the process at the moment to add SOAP and XML
to our PowerNet stack. So far the XML support is less than 500
lines of code for parsing. Of course, we are much helped by having
a Forth interpreter which makes it easy to manage name lists.

You can make *lots* of simplifying assumptions if your application
is constrained rather than a general purpose solution. If all your
transfers are machine generated, you don't really need validation,
you just need to refuse or ignore the request for unknown input.

For configuration, you already know what can be confgured, so the
list of tags you need to respond to is fairly small. Similarly,
the data types are predefined.

Like others, we've found the Wrox book good, and we also like
the O'Reilley "XML in a Nutshell" book.

Stephen

--
Stephen Pelc, snipped-for-privacy@mpeforth.com
MicroProcessor Engineering Ltd - More Real, Less Time
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: XML Book
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Beginning XML, 3rd Edition, ISBN 0-7645-7077-3, www.wrox.com

--
Cecil



Site Timeline