Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?

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Hi everyone,

Ive only worked with the Atmel ARM variants, but im curious about
knowing your views on which ARM-based microcontroller is the most
popular..Plz enlighten me!

Regards

Mayank


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?

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It's impossible to answer this. ARM cores are used in ASICs and ASSPs
all over the place. Modern USB flash memory drives - those little
pocket gumstick drives - even use ARM processors, and they are made by
the boatload. How many cellphones are there on the market? ARM is very
popular inside cellphone ASSPs. How many MP3 players on the market? ARM
is exceedingly popular inside MP3 player ASSPs.

No two of these devices use the same chip.


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
Okay...Lets put it this way..which ARM-based microcontroller is the
easiest to work with, the criterea for "easy" range from the way to
access internal components, example code availability, and the
existance of user groups etc.

-Mayank


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?

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The market is too fragmented to make a sensible determination here. I'd
probably say Philips chips have the best hobbyist visibility as
individual chips, but that doesn't really mean anything. XScale is used
in a lot more hobbyist projects, but not as chips; people buy modules.


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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Probably the Philips LPC2000 family. The LPC2000 Yahoo group I formed is
very active (1300+ members) and has lots of code and hardware designs
available. Philips themselves recommend it to customers. 8-)


Leon
--
Leon Heller, G1HSM
http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller



Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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Maybe Philips LPC2000 or Atmel AT91.

--

Tauno Voipio
tauno voipio (at) iki fi


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
i.fi.NOSPAM.invalid> writes
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Or the ST or the...

Which ever you can find the right peripherals that has a nice dev board
and tools.
  

/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England    /\/\/\/\/\
/\/\/ snipped-for-privacy@phaedsys.org       www.phaedsys.org \/\/
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
Hi Mayank,

based on the interest in the family, it is probably the LPC2000 from
Philips  (links for the Yahoo froum have already been posted.
There are forums for the Atmel SAM7, the OKI and some others as well
but Philips was the first to come out with a real simple ARM
microcontroller.  Atmel had big ARM devices for a long time but they
are not as popular as the small single chip devices.
So if you need an ARM with lots of external memory, have a look at
Atmel, OKI, Samsung, Sharp, etc.. If you want a single chip version,
Philips offers the best selection of small devices with 48 and 64-pins.

An Schwob

Mayank Kaushik wrote:
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Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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It would be interesting to know how You measure this.

There are plenty of customers which are using the AT91 microprocessors,
but most of those customers do not use newsgroups and does not use Yahoo.
The download the AT91 CD which has plenty of examples
or frequent other distribution lists like the arm-linux kernel list.
Many I meet get those lists, but seldom make an entry.

From a market point of view, single chip micros always
have higher volume than the external bus micros, so I expect
the volume for the SAM7 to grow nicely.

I think it would be interesting to measure how many will switch from
the SAM7 to the Philips and how many will switch in the other direction.

The AT91SAM7 is just about to enter production but we have already stolen
quite a few Philips designs.

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If you look at a matrix of part you will notice that Philips has more
devices
but the range of Atmel flash parts is wider.


48 PIN PARTs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
32kB                        AT91SAM7S32
64 kB
128 kB
LPC2104/5/6

64 PIN PARTS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
32kB                                                              LPC2131*
64kB                        AT91SAM7S64            LPC2132*
128kB                      AT91SAM7S128          LPC2114
256kB                      AT91SAM7S256          LPC2124
512kB                      AT91SAM7S512*        LPC2138*

64 PIN PARTS WITH 2 X CAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
128kB                                                            LPC2119
256kB                                                            LPC2129

64 PIN PARTS WITH 2 X CAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
256kB                                                            LPC2194

'*' not available yet, LPC213x is close though if I understand things
correctly.


100 PIN PARTS WITH 2 X CAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
256kB                       AT91SAM7A3


SMALLEST PART - TQFP48 LOWEST COST
Atmels smallest part is a 48 pin part with 32 kB Flash and 8 kB SRAM
Philips smallest part is a 48 pin device with 32 kB part and 16 kB SRAM
Atmel should win round for lowest cost

SMALLEST  PART - TQFP48 MOST MEMORY
Atmel has the AT91SAM7S32 with 32 kB + 8 kB SRAM
Philips has the 128 kB LPC210x family - This is a 128 kB with 16/32/64kB
SRAM
Philips wins the round.

SMALLEST  PART - TQFP48 Analog
Atmel has the AT91SAM7S32 with ADC
Philips 48 pin parts do not have ADC onboard
Atmel wins the round

LARGEST PART FLASH MEMORY
Atmels largest part in 64 TQFP is 256 kB Flash with 64 kB SRAM
(AT91SAM7S256)
Atmels pincompatible AT91SAM7S512 is some time away.
but also have BGA with 512kb/2 MB Flash and 256 kB SRAM.
This is a dual chip package and does not have so many features though
Philips largest announced part is LPC2138 w 512kB Flash and 16 kB
Atmel wins the round if BGA is acceptable, otherwise Philips (when
available)

LARGEST PART SRAM MEMORY
Atmels largest part in 64 TQFP is 256 kB Flash with 64 kB SRAM
(AT91SAM7S256)
Philips has a single part with 64 kB SRAM and this has 128 kB Flash
The larger parts have less memory. Even the LPC2138 w 512kB Flash has 32 kB
It is even for 32 kB/64kB Flash
Philips wins the 128 kB Flash
Atmel wins the 256 kB Flash

PERFORMANCE
Philips has an 128 but wide flash bus running at 20 MHz
Atmel has a 32 bit wide flash bus running at 30 Mhz
Philips has higher performance in ARM mode
Atmel has higher performance in Thumb Mode
If you really need the performance, the AT91RM3400 will outperform
the LPC by executing from its 96 kB SRAM at zero waitstates. This will need
an external SO-8 dataflash
If you can afford the 30-40% increase in code size incurred by the ARM mode
then Philips is your choice. If not, go for Atmel.
If you accept external memories, the peripherals of the AT91SAM7s
series (except the analog) is available in the AT91RM9200 at 200 MIPS.

I/O
Atmel has a 100 pin TQFP series single chip.
Philips soes not have a 100 pin single chipper.

PERIPHERALS
Atmel peripherals are generally more advanced, coming from ARM9 chips.
This means they can handle more complex problems



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Ulf Samuelsson
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Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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I, for one, would never use a Philips, since it has no memory protection
scheme.

Meindert


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Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?

Their selector guides show memory protection on newer models.

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..and there are ARM uC devices from
TI  : MSP470 series, advanced timer support, 80/100 pins
ADi : ADuC7xxx : Advanced Analog Modules
STm : STR7 family

... and if a 30-50MHz ARM core, with 32-512K of Code, and 64KRAM is too
wimpy for your embedded widget, you can always pop in the new TC1796
TriCore from Infineon : 150 MHz DSP/FPU, 2MBytes/ECC FLASH, 192KB SRAM,
Automotive Spec, - includes a 32 bit Co-processor for interrupt/DMA
style tasks...

-jg






Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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I suppose they just had to, to hold their market share... :-)

Meindert



Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
Meindert,

seems you looked at Philips the last time 18 months ago when the very
first LPC2104/05/06 became available (more than one year ahead of any
other small ARM device!!).
Point well taken, the LPC210x don't have code protection, however, the
flash devices (>10) all do. Let's call it an oversight of the pioneers
with the face in the dust.

As to the availability, somebody marked the devices of the
LPC2130-series not available that have been acknowledged in the LPC2000
newsgroup being available for almost 3 months. LPC2138, LPC2132 and
LPC2131.  afaik the LPC2134 and LPC2136 are not released to the market
yet but given pin compatibility with the LPC2138, everybody can start
the design.

Atmels SAM7 has claimed to have better peripherals, it seems there has
been some oversight to provide enough pins to get them out. Comparing
the 64-pin devices gives me almost 10 extra I/O pins on the Philips
devices. There is a point though in making the JTAG pins dedicated but,
who ever uses Philips has that option, who uses Atmel does not have the
option to use the JTAG pins as I/O.

Last but not least the measure about the most popular ARM devices?
How many people (not volume) are using the device and are willing to
share their wisdom. That is my measure. So the AVR from Atmel is very
popular (e.g. in the newsgroups / Yahoo forums), so is the Microchip
PIC but talking about ARM devices, my bet is on the LPC2000 family.

Talking about high volume delivery into the market, TI delivered double
digit million parts into ABS but are their devices very popular (yet)?
Many high volume designers use the ARM7 (and now ARM9) for ASICs in
hand-helds but does that make the devices popular?

A Yahoo forum with more than 1300 members and more than 500 on topic
messages a month, that makes a device popular.

That is just my personal opinon.


Meindert Sprang wrote:
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from
direction.
protection
stolen
at
version,
more
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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LPC2131*
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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LPC2119
LPC2129
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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LPC2194
things
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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SRAM
SRAM
16/32/64kB
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though
has 32
will
ARM
MIPS.
chips.


Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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I indeed wasn't aware of the newer types. I'll look into these, thanks.

Meindert



Re: Which is the most popular ARM-based microcontroller?
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My mistake, the timing was actually referring to the LPC214x.
Realized that after sending the entry.

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The addition of the on chip voltage regulator is a key feature which cost
some pins.

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So I wonder how the 250+ projects for the AT91 in my tiny little
region (which normally consist of 5% of the total world market) compares to
that.
Very few (< 10%) use newsgroups, and only a couple use Yahoo.

Based on experience, I know also that there are probably plenty of projects
which
that I dont even know about.

If this is replicated worldwide, then there is 5000 projects.
Does that make the AT91 popular or not?

The fact that a newsgroup does not have so many entries does not
neccessarily make
the chip unpopular. It does mean that the user community is not organized.
It could mean that the local support for the chip is good and that
newsgroups is not needed.

I think you mistake activity on newsgroups for popularity or you define
popularity as activity
on newsgroups instead of number of people actually using the chips.

I also hear comments from distributors about which is part sells best
and comments from tool vendors, which ARM part their customers use
and that is positive (They could of course be lying their teeths out ;-)


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Which you are entitled to.

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