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Re: what's a callback?

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Eh?  How did you do that?  I've plugged several Win2K drives into new
machines without any untoward behavior.

What did they come out of, Dell, hp, or some other "name" brand that
puts proprietary crap on their drives?

That's why I now only buy "parts-in-a-box" machines.

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                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
|  James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
|  Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Re: what's a callback?
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No, actually Rich is quite right. W2K installs special drivers for
a few things as mundane as IDE controllers, instead of using generic
drivers like previous versions of Windoze. It won't boot if it has
the wrong ones for the m/board the disk is attached to. You've
probably just been lucky.

Re: what's a callback?
On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 13:01:07 +1100, the renowned Clifford Heath

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Isn't there some special boot sequence that will cause it to
re-discover everything?  I recall finding something like that *after*
re-installing all the software on a computer that I replaced the
motherboard on.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: what's a callback?

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I'm sure there's some secret backdoor of some kind, but sitting in
front of a red screen of death with the boss literally breathing down
your neck (don't they have any idea how annoying that is?) didn't seem
like a good time to go searching for one. ;-)

I have a perfect opportunity to test that right now. The comp.
with the 80G drive pooped out the other day, and I'm pretty sure
it's only the power supply, but I'm too short on cash to go get
a new PS, so I took the 80G drive and have put it in the other
computer, where it's now secondary slave. It'll be interesting
to see what happens when I go try to have LILO boot it.

(Oops! Don't let Watson catch me talking about Linux! It's "Off-
Topic." ;-) )

Cheers!
Rich



Cheers!
Rich


Re: what's a callback?
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*ALL* windows versions since Win 3.11 have had their own drivers for
IDE devices (and everything else).  That's the only way to use the
hardware acceleration features of the chipsets.  In any case, the BIOS
hooks are still there and can be used in "safe mode".  one can
generally get into safe mode and install the needed (usually
automatically detected) drivers from there.

The best way to transfer an OS disk to new hardware (motherboard
transplant) is to go into the device manager and delete all the devices
before changing hardware. On boot, WinBlows will then auto-detect the
new hardware (driver disks and a Win CD are often needed here) and
you're off-n-running.

--
  Keith


Re: what's a callback?
snipped-for-privacy@example.com says...
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As have I.  There is no difference between drives, other than the
obvious.  There are differences between motherboards, and booting to
"safe mode" will allow one to rediscover the IDE drivers.  Sometimes it
even works. ;-)

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I've built only KeithKits for a decade because all the others *suck*.  

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--
  Keith

Re: what's a callback?

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I was about to do a google search for "KeithKits", but then I noticed your
name...

Rufus



Re: what's a callback?
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...
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Yeah, at work they're known as "FrankenClones", but I prefer
"KeithKit". ;-)

--
  Keith

Re: what's a callback?

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[Snipped]

Even worse, I updated the BIOS on a dual-boot W2K, Redhat machine.
W2K went absoltely haywire on rebooting  - even though only some of
the PCI addresses had changed. Redhat had no problems. It informed me
that it had detected changes in the addresses of various cards and
whether I would like to use the existing driver.

Regards
   Anton Erasmus


Re: what's a callback?
On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 20:01:12 GMT, "Charles W. Johson Jr."

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How many grannies can run RegEdit? Or change their IP address? Or set
IE to its non-default (ie, somewhat secure) settings?

Changing from modem to DSL, or setting up your internet stuff, on a
Mac is stunning; you just do the obvious stuff, and it's all obvious.

My next-door neighbow is a sweet gay guy with zero technical
competance; naturally, he's a Mac person. When I got my DSL, we
drilled a hole through our walls and ran a Cat5 from my hub to his
iMac. He clicked a few times, typed in his new IP, and was online in a
couple of minutes. It took me, a programmer and EE, about an hour to
persuade Windows to do the same thing. I used his Mac to go to my
provider's web site to read the Windows procedures.

John


Re: what's a callback?
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hold.
every
that
assembler
indeed
learnt
sometimes,
believe
fact
to

Ah, you can be really entertaining at times. Keep those stories
coming! You seem to have a lot in common with your neighbour,
except being gay ;)

--
Thanks, Frank.
(remove 'q' and 'invalid' when replying by email)




Re: what's a callback?
On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 00:30:59 +0100, "Frank Bemelman"
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Well, he *does* let me borrow his chainsaw.

John


Re: what's a callback?
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Sure it is. Boot time as a measure of quality is ridiculous. I boot
once a day, sometimes perhaps twice, when Protel is playing up. The
other day you hooked up that $79 usb microscope, that's progress.

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My embedded stuff doesn't crash either, it would hardly know how to
do that.

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learnt

All I remember from DEC is that PDP11/03 that gave me sore knees,
pulling the boards in & out to keep it going. RT11 OS if I remember
well. What a piece of shit was that ;)

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You should not compare your embedded stuff with de desktop computer
running windows. Those are two entirely different species. Your 68K
does only one thing - easy. If I plug your software in whatever 68K
board, nothing happens, nada, zip. These are projects that can be
done by just one or two persons, that's why I said it is kindergarten
stuff compared to windows.

Imagine you had to deliver some kind of open system, where 3rd parties
plug in their boards & drivers in your box. Would you like that? Can
you still guarantee your product doesn't crash?


--
Thanks, Frank.
(remove 'q' and 'invalid' when replying by email)






Re: what's a callback?


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there
*reliable*
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(although the
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MMUs for

This is precisely what makes me so mad about windows.  The PC hardware
is perfectly capable of protecting the OS from this sort of thing, but
MS simply chooses to not do it right.  :-((((((  Having spent >20 years
digging around the innards of mainframe OS's, I'm really disappointed at
what is passed off as "enterprise quality" today.


Re: what's a callback?


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Namely, MS can never tell the difference between code and data; they
have finally managed to allow worms in jpeg files, something that was
once considered to be a hilarious joke. When in doubt, execute it.

John


Re: what's a callback?
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Which is absolutely the way to go.

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Couldn't agree more.

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I love you, soulbro' <sob>. Have a great Xmas ;).

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com



Re: what's a callback?

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I have been involved in the past with serious efforts to replace aircraft
mechanical instruments with computer displays.  If the OS crashes, people
die.

No Windows need apply.




Re: what's a callback?

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One of my customers builds jet engines and their control computers. An
engine control computer is a suitcase-looking thing that's just under
the cowling, exposed to the altitude and temperature and all. They run
the jet fuel through the computer before they burn it, to moderate the
computer's temperature. They program bare-metal because they can't
trust any available OS. I think they are looking at QNX or Wind River
or something, but no deployment so far. All their test cell stuff is
Unix or lately Linux with VME i/o. They laugh at Windows.

In my company, most of our test racks run DOS.

John






Re: what's a callback?

[...]

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John,

I run DOS also and often need more than the 640k of base ram. Extended
memory is terribly slow if you have to go through Himem, but you can
bypass Himem and use flat mode which is much faster. It is compatible
with DOS real mode code, and it avoids the speed and reliability issues
of Protected mode.

One of the problems with flat mode is debugging code that addresses
memory above 1 meg. The solution is a small tsr that allows you to view
arrays and data anywhere in memory. Four markers are provided that can be
set by your code so you can see if data is transferred properly to and
from extended memory. Here's the url:

  http://mrmonett.freewebpage.org/frm.htm

Best,

Mike Monett

Re: what's a callback?

[...]

 
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Mechanical instruments have serious problems of their own, and "glass
cockpits" are slowly moving down to general aviation. One of the best
approaches is redundant systems, but they can have bizarre failure modes of
their own. Here is an analysis from Risks Digest on the Airbus fly-by-wire:

    "According to  Airbus Industrie, there are several  ways  in which
    the exchange  of data and/or a problem in one computer  can affect
    the other  computer. Often the computers reset themselves  after a
    few seconds but occasionally a fault results in  repetitive resets
    or attempts  to  resynchronise.   The  fifth  reset  relatches the
    computer, which will not recover without a power  interrupt. Reset
    breakers for  manual  power  interrupts  are  on  the  flight deck
    overhead panel.  Dual  resets  occur  when  both  FMGECs encounter
    failures at  the  same time. They generally  occur  after  a pilot
    entry that involves use of the navigation database or to  an event
    synchronised between  both   flight   management  systems. Latched
    double failures usually occur if pilots successively perform three
    inputs that  cause a reset, or if an  `impossible'  computation of
    predictions occurs."

    http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/16.96.html

Sounds a bit like Windows:)

Best,

Mike Monett

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