What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?

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Happy new years!  Welcome to 2006.  I'm a little late, but thought I
should ask the new years question;

What embedded hardware do you look forward to playing or seeing in
2006?

I'll run my short list here;
Renesas SH4a SH7780
P.A. Semi's gear, not that anyone would ever let me near one
Some kind of Blackfin.

Anything you really want to see this year?  Anything you wish you'd
see?  Just curious, wish you all the best 2006.


Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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Whatever we make most profit from working on. (As long as it doesn't
have Metrowerks or Green Hills tools). ;)

pete
--
snipped-for-privacy@fenelon.com "there's no room for enigmas in built-up areas" - HMHB.

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
I like to see some ARM Cortex-M3 processors


Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?

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The MSP430F2xxx with a hardware multiplier in there.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
comp.arch.embedded:

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I'd like to have an IBM/Sony/Toshiba Cell processor, the one that's
going to be in the playstation 3.  At reasonable prices in reasonable
quantities.

--
Jack Klein
Home: http://JK-Technology.Com
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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
Not so much hardware, as software: a *free* GCC toolchain for the
Infineon TriCore.
There's currently (afaik) only 2 toolsets available: HiTec GCC and
Tasking. Neither free.

The TriCore could power some neat robotic projects, but only if one
could get software for it.

rektide wrote:
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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 01:28:29 -0800, David R Brooks

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Shouldn't the source for any GCC port be available because of GPL ?
AFAIU the actual compiler is available for free, but that you get
extra propriety libraries optomised for the TriCore when you buy the
HiTec tools. Maybe a port of something like avr-libc combined with
GCC toolset would be viable ?

Regards
  Anton Erasmus

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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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(a) A resurrected Harris RTX2000 with larger
addressing space and a "normal" life span.

(b) Non-Harvard AVR processors. (or rather, no
Harvard architecture processors at all, period.)

(c) Byte addressing and hardware support for
multiple breakpoints in Texas Instruments
28XX DSP processors.

(d) Large gate count FPGAs in PLCC packaging (or
something else a hobbyist can handle at home)

(e) Open/public bitstream formats for FPGAs,
so I can play with my own design tools.

Not embedded hardware, but still in my wish list:

(f) Hewlett-Packard/Agilent manufacturing RPN
calculators like in the good old days.


Yes, I know, none of this is likely to happen ...


Roberto Waltman

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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?

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You are not alone Roberto, I too share some of your dream.
--
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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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Yup.


Ditto.

Well actually less and less manufacturers are bothering with DIP / PLCC
packages. That will be a serious issue eventually. True enough, if we
get some high gate count FPGAs in "hobbyist-grade" packages, it will be
up to us to fill the gaps.

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Could be useful indeed. Especially in the above situation!

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Oh gawd yes...

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Maybe tomorrow, maybe someday! :)

D.

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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[snip]
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The problem here is not marketing, but technical. The IO cells in modern
FPGA's switch so fast that package-lead inductance becomes a real
problem (for both signals & power). As designs move to smaller feature
sizes, they get faster...

Also, large gate-count devices have large IO pin counts (that's just
geometry: roughly, pin_count = 4 * sqrt(number_of_cells). It's just the
relation of the squares on a chessboard, to its perimeter. Think what a
PLCC with 1000 or so leads would look like! At 0.5mm pitch, that's 125mm
on a side - it's not a package, but a mini-PCB.

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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I suspect he was meaning with a smaller pin count.  What you say
regarding inductances is perfectly true.  However, I think there might
be a market for FPGAs/CPLDs which were better optimised for simpler
boards.  If you have a design with signals running at 200 MHz, you need
to be using BGA packages with multiple power and ground balls spread
around the package.  However, most embedded boards are not running at
that sort of speed.  If an FPGA package were designed to be limited to
external I/O speeds of, say, 50 MHz, then it could be made far simpler
for designers.  The could use PLCC or TQFP packaging (with fewer pins
for the same number of logic elements), or BGAs with convenient power
pinning (such as power rings, rather than mixing the power balls with
the signals).  Internal speeds would not be unduly affected.

And talking about mini-PCBs - another nice idea would be to have
appropriate bypass capacitors inside the package for high density
components, so that you only need a few bigger caps on the board.

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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This should be possible, using modern FPGAs ?
How about
http://www.mpeforth.com/rtx.htm


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http://www.hp.com/calculators/news/rpn.html ?

-jg


Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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I'd like to see this, too.  Brooks' comment about the lead-inductance
confuses me, though: in the olden days we used to be able to control the
slew rate of the IO pad and select low rates to minimize ground bounce.
  Are slew rates no longer configurable on the IO pads?

Besides, I think a low IO count / high gate count FPGA would be great
for hobby use.  I typically consider CPLDs for this sort of thing now,
but it'd be great to have a few order of magnitude more gates to play
with ;)

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While I would welcome a public bitstream format, I remember using the
vendor tools a dozen years ago - you started a bitstream load with one
fingertip on the top of the FPGA, and the other finger on the power
switch.  When the tools mangled the bitstream and the part latched up,
you could remove power before the chip cooked itself.  Maybe.

I don't look forward to playing with another alpha-quality open source
bitstream tool.

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I picked up the 'new' RPN calc (33S) and can't say that it's replaced my
trusty 42S for daily use.  The v-shaped buttons are weird, the unit is
too thick, and the unit generally feels less rugged than the old ones.
But the tactile feel is good, the 2-line display seems pleasantly huge
for my eyes, and the functions I care about are available.

Kelly

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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[snip]
Even if you can control the IO slew rate, two problems remain:
1. The sheer number of IO's (you may design to avoid simultaneous
switching, but the chip maker can't depend on that).
2. Apart from the IO, core switching, which knocks back on the power
leads. Even an inexpensive part like a small Xilinx Spartan may now need
3 supply rails, each massively decoupled, with a multi-layer PCB
virtually mandatory.

The chip makers' prime markets want speed: they don't care about BGA
packages, since they outsource assembly to well-equipped factories
anyway. Let's be honest here, hobbyists have no commercial clout.

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
On Friday, in article

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There are applications where the logic inside is large but the I/O count
is relatively small (usually pipelined algorithms video/audio processing)
that does not need to access memory or need large I/O.

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Forgetting hobbyists there many applications built that are in small
runs (less than 1k in product LIFETIME) where BGA production is not a
viable option.

All that happens is less and less deiversity and creativity will happen
in the the long term fewer design companies are actually making anything
new unless they can million+ volumes. The designers in all teh companies
up the cain become dependent on each other, so that as soon as one folds
it has major economical impact on the rest.

Wondering for example what is going to happen to Intel when PC manufacturers
really start closing down, due to not enough people buying new computers
every 6 months.

--
Paul Carpenter          | snipped-for-privacy@pcserviceselectronics.co.uk
<http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/ PC Services
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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
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Why would you expect that?  Do you think that Microsoft is suddenly going
to stop making each new release of their softare more bloated and slower
than the previous release?

Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?
Actually, I think i saw an RPN calculator by HP at the local friendly
Walmart the other day.  I think
it 's called the 33S.

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Re: HP Calculators?
I thought HP was going to quit making calculators.

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Re: What arch's do you look forward to in 2006?

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Three vendors [Atmel, Ramtron, SiLabs] are expanding their 1 Cycle C51
family offerings in 2006 - good to see that range expanding.
and most ARM variants - tend to have better peripheral bandwidth.

-jg


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