What about the motorola microcontroller?

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Is it good to learn or to use.What general factor we should consider
if I we want to use it? I'm just newbie in microcontroller and have a
very great interesting in it.


Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Is it good to learn or to use.What general factor we should consider
if I we want to use it? I'm just newbie in microcontroller and have a
very great interesting in it.


Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Which Motorola microcontroller. They make several (68HC05/08/11/12, M*Core,
68K-based, PowerPC).

Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
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Motorola is now On Semiconductor. Have a look at their web site
(http://www.onsemi.com /) and see if their MCUs are suitable for your
application.

Leon
--
Leon Heller, G1HSM
http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller



Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Sorry, but for microcontroller, this is FRESSCALE : www.freescale.com

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Yvan
http://www.ybdesign.fr


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Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?

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What a horrible name.  You'd think a company that size could do
better than that.

Rufus



Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 10:23:32 -0500, the renowned "Rufus V. Smith"

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They held onto the microcontroller business a bit longer than the rest
of the semiconductor stuff, and spun it off as "Freescale". That's
where you'll find the MCUs.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?

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Motorola is Motorola, and it makes cell phones and other system-level
stuff.  But it has spun off not one, but two semiconductor companies: On
semiconductor got opamps, gates, discretes and other "commodity" semis,
Freescale semiconductor got microprocessors, DSPs and other "top end" stuff.

I can't remember who got the RF stuff; I think it Freescale but I always
have to look.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:02:10 -0800, Tim Wescott

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The two companies are starting to make competing components in some
areas as well. Specifically LINBus, CAN and other automotive
components.

Anton Erasmus


Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
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Hi, the trick is to have the application first, then choose a micro that fits
the bill.

Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?

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fits

That all depends on numbers.  If low volume then learning curves are such a
generic well featured micro would be a good choice.

The trouble with most Motorola micros is that they have so much historical
garbage with them I can't really recommend them for a newbie.

Also what's the budget for a compiler and/or debug tool?  If on the very
cheap then have a look at the SDCC compiler.  It caters for many of the
available micros.



Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
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I beg to differ. The ease with which you get your application
together depends largely on the development environment.
I'm quite charmed by Metrowerks Codewarrior for HC08
in combination with Processor Expert. The latter shields off
most of the intricacies that come with initializing the various
peripherals. I'm aware that there's a performance penalty to
pay, but that outweighs the speed with which you get the app
up and running. At a later stage you can always delve into the
nitty-gritty if you need (want).
As to the 'historical garbage' , that's a purely subjective
judgement. The application determines the MCU. It all comes
down to 'good tools make good products'.

Have fun

Waldemar



Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
I want to use it in automotive.But I am unknown with the motorola MCU.


Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Use what your friends and peers use.That way you have local 'hands on' help
available that can actually see what you're doing. The Web may be great at
some things but hands on isn't one of them.
As far as the Motorola chips, just be sure you can GET the parts! I got
screwed twice by them ( hc705 and hc11 series) a long time ago went to
Microchip PIC series and never looked back. PICs allowed me to retire
early( 45) so I am partial to them.
Whatever you choose, stick with it. Going to the 'latest and greatest' isn't
the best approach. Learn how to use what you have.
JAY




Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Now, Freescale let you order samples of their chips, even microcontroller
like 68HC908.

--
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Yvan
http://www.ybdesign.fr


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Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?
Hello Jay,

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Wow. How did you do that? Could you elaborate a little without breaking
any confidentiality?

Besides the business aspects, how did you determine how much is enough
to retire on? You see all those over-simplified examples in the
financial advice columns of newspapers but not really much in terms of
detailed stories about how somebody actually did it.

With respect to the topic, despite being used to the standard C51
families I am beginning to get my hands dirty with the MSP430. Bought
the tools and will start soon. I found this to be the most intriguing uC
because of its low power capabilities and the sheer volume of variants.
Seems like the MSP is here to stay. My only gripe is that it is kind of
tough to find enough information about nitty gritty hardware details
like the DCO or transistor level schematics for the ports, and since I
am a hardware guy that would be important. So far they really don't have
an available device in the 'well under $1' class but hopefully that will
change.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?

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historical

We are talking many thousands of pounds for the system you describe.  Whilst
long term economic sense I'm not sure if this sort of expenditure is likely
for a newbie.  For a starter on a limited budget the Rabbit may be perfectly
adequate.

The Motorola range of micro has a lot of clutter in its architecture
normally unseen in other devices.  Yes a good development environment will
mask all of this as you say but I don't feel it's an ideal situation.




Re: What about the motorola microcontroller?

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Not for learning.
For learning choose a popular one, such as PIC & AVR

Rene

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