uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS

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Hi,

I need a way to communicate to a soft-processor (Altera's Nios),
mostly for uploading new FPGA/Nios flash files.  However, Im using a
board that only has an RS-232...  I thought I was destined to some
cheap looking terminal type user interface with xmodem or the like...
but then I ran into uIP and lwIP!  (
http://www.sics.se/~adam/uip/index.php/Main_Page
)

So Im thinking if I implement SLIP,  I could then serve up a simple
web-based flash utitlity to any PC thats connected to it via RS-232
(winxp should be able to connect via dial-up using SLIP).   Does this
seem plausible?

Looking at some of the documentation and some existing uIP ports, it
looks like its meant for just an 8-bit processor running an RTOS of
some variety (Contiki, Salvo, uC/OS-II, uCos, etc).

The fpga's Nios is 32-bits, but that shouldnt cause a problem.. the
issue of running an RTOS might be a bigger problem since I have very
few ram blocks allocated inside the FPGA.

Any thoughts why this may or may not work, or ideas of perhaps a
different approach.  My goal is just to allow the user to program the
board without requiring any special programming software (other than a
web browser).

Thanks!

Re: uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS
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WinXP can use SLIP, although the configuration is fairly manual and
somewhat involved (at least from the perspective of the average
user).  A quick Google turned up the following, which more-or-less
coincides with my memories of doing this a few years ago:

http://www.sics.se/~bg/telos/slipintro.pdf

If you can do a PPP implementation instead, you'll have an easier time
with the PC configuration.  That's obviously a tradeoff you need to
pick based on your user community.  You will have to make some
decisions regarding how dynamic some of the IP settings are, but
again, if you can toss some complexity off to the PC users, you can
simplify a number of things (like eliminating the need for DHCP by
using a fixed IP address on the device).

But your idea of serving up web pages via a serial (SLIP or PPP)
connection is sound, except perhaps for the Flash bit.  Writing a
small web server (assuming you don't have one already) is not a big
deal, but I don't know what Flash support might require.

You may still want a limited terminal style interface, especially if
you're using SLIP, so that some of the IP settings can be semi-
conveniently changed on the device.  Both SLIP and PPP more or less
assume they're starting from a terminal type connection, and negotiate
from there (perhaps that's overstating in the case of SLIP).

You might want to look at Betham's "TCP/IP Lean", where he implements
a minimalist TCP/IP stack (including Ethernet and PPP) and web server
on a PIC.

Re: uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS
On Jan 2, 10:32 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"
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Thanks for the link.

My intent is that the interface is only going to be used for firmware
upgrades, so it shouldnt be that frequent..  the user may just have to
live with the cumbersome winxp slip configuration when upgrading :)

btw, when I mentioned flash, I meant uploading the firmware to flash
memory not serving up Adobe Flash based web pages :)


Re: uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS
In article <c9e3a4ec-57ca-4b3c-a0e8-271f2ecaba28
@l79g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...
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I think the OP meant "Flash memory", not "Flash animation".  It's to
allow firmware updates.

--Gene



Re: uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS
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The first part of this is sort of correct - uIP is designed for very low RAM
usage so 8biters are more than capable of running it, but its use if far
from limited to 8bit architecture.

The second part is not really correct - there is no requirement to use an
RTOS to run uIP.  In fact, I think the WEB server demo in the uIP download
runs without an RTOS.  You just need a way of measuring time to call the
periodic functions.

--
Regards,
Richard.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: uIP TCP/IP stack -- Implementing on a 32 bit soft-processor with no OS
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