Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?

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Hi All,

I am looking to buy/lease test equipment for embedded work. I need to do
some SPI work probably with HC908 family parts. I borrowed a very NICE Tek
DSO model TDS5054B and it worked great for capturing the SPI data on my
prototype board. I think this DSO is overkill and very costly for what I
really need.

Maybe a general purpose approach using a few pieces of test equipment for
bringing boards up
Any suggestions please?

TIA,
David Evennou




Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
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If you want an excellent and incredibly versatile
instrument for the absolutely lowest cost, get
an HP 16500 series mainframe and whatever plugins
you need from ebay.

A 16555A 100Mhz state/500Mhz timing plugin and
a 16530A/16531A scope plugin will do all you'll
need and more.

The downside is that it's noisy, has a big footprint,
and the floppy drive can sometimes be troublesome.

The upside is that you can configure it with
digital scope cards, logic analyzers and pattern
generators so that you have just the instrument
you need.

If you want something small and light, an HP 1652A
goes for about $300 on ebay, has an 80 channel
logic analyzer and 2-channel digital scope. Again,
the floppy drive can be troublesome.



Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
I've never used anything other than an o'scope for SPI development, and
not even a storage scope.  I've sometimes had to write temporary loops
that generate SPI traffic at sufficient rates to trigger the 'scope, but
other than that, it's not been a big deal.

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          Michael Kesti            |  "And like, one and one don't make
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Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?

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A decent multi-meter is a must as the first item that should be in your
kit. An reasonably good oscilloscope is also very useful, especially if you
are looking for timing problems. One with a dual triggerable timebase is
very handy in this respect. I am perusing datasheets at present for a
suitable replacement for my old Tek 465 which has served me very well for
so many years that I forget when I bought it (second hand at that too).

You should also consider the development tools as part of your test kit as
well IMO. I find that I can diagnose a large number of problems by writing
Forth words and using a digital probe to detect the change of state of
various pins (usually logic problems). The PC can be pressed into duty as a
data monitor on a number of simple serial interfaces (synchronous and
asynchronous at reasonable speeds).

On buying secondhand equipment, always see the equipment running before you
part with your money. Use your nose on it and ensure that no un-expected
smells are given off (I know one peice that smelled wet and warm that I
advised a friend not to touch). If the gear came from reputable previous
owners it should be perfectly servicable for a long time to come and will
be significantly less cost than brand new.

Having said that  I must admit that I am liking the look of the new Fluke
Scope-meter at present and it seems to be reasonably priced.

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Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
says...
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If you have the budget for it I like the Agilent Mixed Signal
Oscilloscopes.  A couple of analog channels and 16 logic analyser
channels.  Covers a nice range of troubleshoot/debugging and the built-in
syncronization between the digital and anlog side is occaisionally
invaluable.

Robert

Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
In comp.arch.embedded,
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These equivalent to the HP54645D, aren't they? Very nice instruments,
apart from the 2A/16D, the 'mega zoom' feature is really nice. Most
DSOs and logic analyzers only store a few K points, this one stores
up to 1M points. That means you can set your timebase slow enough to
capture an entire transaction and can still zoom in on timing details.
Combined with the pretty advanced triggering (for a DSO) you can
almost always get the thing you want to see on the screen.

Someone else mentioned a multimeter to start by measuring the supply.
In addition to that, always measure your supplies with a scope as well
and cycle through all the available timebases. It is not uncommon to
find a DC supply that gives exactly the required voltage on your
multimeter but oscillates severely. This is especially true for
switching supplies.


--
Stef    (remove caps, dashes and .invalid from e-mail address to reply by mail)

meetings, n.:
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Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 12:12:37 +0100, stef33d@yahooI-N-V-A-L-I-D.com.invalid

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Deep memory (megazoom etc. ) is THE most useful feature on any digital scope. It
saves so much time
as you rarely need to set up any special triggering (if any at all)- just grab a
big lump of data
and zoom in on the part of interest.




Re: Test Equipment Suggestions for Embedded SPI work?
On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 14:03:33 -0500, "David Evennou"

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While a DSO is VERY nice, once the voltage levels are confirmed, it
really isn't necessary.  For a lot of serial protocol analysis
including SPI, I use an inexpensive USB Logic Analyzer.  Rocky Logic
http://www.rockylogic.com/ has 8 & 16 bit products that are much lower
cost than any scope.  I use the ANT-8 because 1) I don't need the
additional channels, 2) it was lower cost than the ANT-16, and MOST
IMPORTANTY, 3) it has a longer capture buffer than the ANT-16.

Regards
- Bill Knight
R O SoftWare


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