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Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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I had this conversation just last night. I had about 50 false starts with
Emacs. I could get through the tutorial, but it still made no sense. Then
I asked a guru to give me about an hour's overview, and that did it. That
was 6 or 7 years ago.

I knew Emacs was the way to go since about 1989, because all the real
Unix programmers used it. But I can't tell you how to get started if you
don't have access to a guru.

The Cygwin version of XEmacs is just fine.


Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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Since I'm banging my drum:

epsilon -t

(teach mode)

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Kevin D Quitt  USA 91387-4454         96.37% of all statistics are made up

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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Use the following procedure to delete a word of text: Hold down shift,
control, Q, then hit - and Y with your nose.


Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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different

There is of course the olden hexadecimal editor with a row of
bulbs and toggle and pushbuttons, but is it still in use?

(couldn't resist!)


Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
Real Programmers (TM) use TECO.


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Kevin D Quitt  USA 91387-4454         96.37% of all statistics are made up

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
Realer programmers use "cat > file"

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Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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Escape Meta Alt Control Shift (EMACS) was originally implemented as a
set of macros over TECO.

Vi is a piece of wombat do.

I use CodeWright because it was the standard at a PPOE.  Previously, I
used BRIEF because it was a standard at another employer.  Seeing that
Borland has purchased both of these, then killed them through neglect,
you might want to avoid my next choice (whatever it is).

Before that was Unipress EMACS under VAX/VMS, CREDIT under ISIS, EDLIN
under PC-DOS (NOT MS-DOS), and @ED under EXEC-8.

In the future, I might look at EMACS (let's see Borland buy that!) or
JED (www.jedsoft.org).  If I was in the mood to buy something, I'd
look at SlickEdit and MultiEdit, and maybe DAC or Understand.

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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Check out Epsilon, then.  http://www.lugaru.com/cgi-bin/send12/eval/m


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Kevin D. Quitt                       snipped-for-privacy@Quitt.net
          96.37% of all statistics are made up

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
ConTEXT (windoze) and jed (*ix)




Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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ConTEXT is also very good, I've used it also, but for windows, I still
like gvim.

--

Wing Wong.

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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GVim is not that bad. Sure its not perfect, but I use it most often. Its
small and its fast.

--

Wing Wong.

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
On Wed, 25 May 2005 05:59:25 +0000 (UTC), Wing Fong Wong

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On the other hand, maybe being a "piece of wombat do" is a *good* thing.
Something similar certainly seems to work for coffee beans ...

http://coffeetea.about.com/cs/kindsofcoffee/a/aakopiluwak.htm

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Rich Webb   Norfolk, VA

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
On Wed, 25 May 2005 05:59:25 +0000 (UTC), Wing Fong Wong

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It's just a piece of old humor left over from the vi vs. emacs editor
wars years back.  "Vi is a Piece of Wombat Do" was the name of a
debate session at the 1985 UNIX User Group conference.  The phrase
made me smile and stuck in my head.  If you deja-google my name and
vi, you'll see I use it at every opportunity.

I really don't know enough about vi to defend or condemn it.
Everything I know about vi I heard third-hand  (e.g., "If you type
"exit" at the command prompt, you will irrevocably destroy your entire
document").  I've never seriously tried to use it.  But I will admit
to being a huge fan of EMACS back in the mid-1980s.

Regards,

                               -=Dave
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Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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Codewright still exists under borland, its not bad, better than the
original. Has new age things like being able to right click an identifier
in the source and get all cross references, etc.

I use old coderight, I didn't upgrade to Borlands because they broke the
Brief emulation in several places.


Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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Real men use Edlin


Bob


Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?



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Realer men use copy con.



Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?

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Kevin was right, at least for systems supporting some kind of file
system.  It's teco.  You can edit and hunt the wumpus at the same
time.  Of course, for truly serious editing under FAT systems, use
DEBUG.  You can edit pretty much everything under DOS, including boot
sectors.

Those folks talking about JAVA and Windows based editors make me want
to rise (creak) up out of my rocking chair to club them with my cane.
They presume tens of megabytes of code floating around just to get the
environment set up for their editor.  Why... the day was when I edited
code in RAM using front panel switches and debugged using an AM radio
by my side to "hear" which routines were being executed.  Finger
calluses from heavy use of the metal bat handle switches, like you
might get playing guitar, was a hazard of the day.  Assembly was a
mental process, as you coded directly in machine code, of course.

:)

Jon

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?



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My computer ran on STEAM.  And the mirrors were 2D and black-and-white
back then, as can be clearly seen in any Marx Brothers film.

Now I whistle into my phone at 56Kbps, doing the trellis encoding
in my head. I can decode audio and video files in real-time, but
decrypting PGP files without the key slows me down a bit...




Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
On Wed, 25 May 2005 20:57:04 +0000, Guy Macon

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Of course, I wasn't being tongue in cheek in my writing, Guy.  I
really did do all those things, exactly as stated, and had the
calluses on the fingers, as well, from the bat handles.  When I saw
the IMSAI, with those wide, plastic switch handles, I knew immediately
the value of them for my poor fingers!  (I also forget to mention, of
course, that I typed using 7 switches and a push button, at times.)

Regarding your comment about modems, I really did whistle into the
acoustic couplers to test communications!  Honestly!

Used to fit entire and useful programs into 256 bytes, back then.  I
was truly in "high cotton" when I got my 4k dynamic cards working.  An
operating system I've written and use today, in fact, requires only a
few bytes of RAM per process, provides compile-time selection for
cooperative or preemptive processes, sleep queues, semaphore queues, a
choice between singly-linked or doubly-linked queues (space
conservation in very desperate circumstances where every byte counts),
various forms of messaging, store and forward ring networking, and
does all this in less than 4k of code and works on most any of the
small 8-bit chips I work on.  Only three tiny modules need be written
in assembly -- global interrupt disable/restore functions, RTC timer
code if needed, and the core task switch (small, usually easy to
write.)

In any case, my point here is that it's not "tall tales."  It's real,
been there, done that kind of stuff.

Jon

Re: Recommendation for Code/Text Editor?
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For General Automation, I had to write the bootstrap for 16 different
devices, and the code to zero out the parity-protected RAM, and I had an
entire 256 (16-bit) words to do it.  They expected to get perhaps 6 or 7
devices supported, but I gave them all 16 - and I had 3 words to spare.

So I asked them if they needed an editor or assembler put in the boot ROM.

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Kevin D Quitt  USA 91387-4454         96.37% of all statistics are made up

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