Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux

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Hi All,

I want to display the real-time data using OpenGL and
is woundering if Windows 2000 Pro on PIV is good enough
for such task.
The uptime required for the system is 1000 hours.
Once I read somewhere that there is a conflict between
windows internal colck and CPU that causes a need for
reboot the system. Due to this clock synchronization problem
W2K machine have to be rebooted after some days ( I dont
remember the exact figures).  
Please advise me which OS should I choose in real-time graphics
display.
If there is any other issue with W2K or Linux, please tell me
that I'd be able to select a better solution.

Thanks

Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
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FWIW, I have heard of people who haven't had to reboot a Linux server for
months. So the uptime in that OS won't be a problem.
Having read several discussions here about real-time in the past, I guess
the real experts will want You to specify what Your idea about "real-time"
is.

Rene



Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
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Uptime of many months is quite common for Linux boxes.  In fact, the
Linux system on which I'm typing this message currently shows an uptime
of 51 days.  It would have been longer, but I was tinkering inside a few
months ago, adding a video capture card.

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Probably more useful would be to simply drop the phrase "real-time" and
describe what is really wanted using non-technical terms (i.e. in the
language of users.)  I've found that this is a really useful way to get
at the real essentials of the problem, even when (or perhaps especially
when) engineers are talking among themselves.

Ed


Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
In newsgroup: comp.arch.embedded
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www.kernel.org, a *VERY* high load Linux server, regularly gets
uptimes measured in months or years.  Last time it was rebooted was
May 26, 2004, and that was for a kernel upgrade.  In fact, ALL the
reboots of the machine in the last two years have been upgrades or, in
one case, a colo move.

    -hpa

Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
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For Windoze!!  Sounds of uncontrollable hysterical laughter.

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   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux

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Chuck, that's only about 42 days. My Win2k box is on 24/7/365. Sometimes I
reboot when I get an updated driver but that's at my discretion. Same goes
for my XP box at home.

--
- Mark ->
--

Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
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My W98 box is also often up for two weeks or more.  After that
things get iffy.  However I also know not to run various things,
including Windows Explorer, or I will experience a BSOD or 'This
program has done something bad...' much sooner.  The 'various
things' include most Microsoft applications, or opening too many
windows, etc.  Meanwhile the swapping file grows indefinitely for
no discernable reason.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux

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Short life then.

Let me know when you get something out of M$ that has been proven to run
for over 219150 continuous hours without upgrade, fault or mistake.
 
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Don't see BSOD's anymore since migrating away from MS products on my desk.
My embedded systems do not often sport screens of any size. They are
usually just a black box on the end of a comms link.

--
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Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
On 5 Oct 2004 05:36:06 -0700, sara snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Sarah Michael)

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I assume that you are referring to the fact that the GetTickCount API
returns the time since startup as milliseconds in a 32 bit unsigned
integer, which starts over from 0 every 49th day and some badly
written applications behaves badly, when this happens.

In a well controlled environment (such as a stand alone system with
only selected software and hardware) it is not a problem to run
Windows NT/2000 based systems for months.

However, if the Windows computer is directly connected to the
internet, it usually takes less than 1000 hours for someone to infect
it with a new virus.  If the computer is not infected within 1000
hours, Microsoft will usually publish a critical security patch within
1000 hours, which requires a reboot :-).

When Microsoft introduced the Win2000, it declared that any
installation requiring a reboot is faulty, however, these myriads of
security patches seem to require a reboot ....

Paul


Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
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Hi,

Thanks all for giving your time.  Well I am trying to figure out the
appropriate OS, from one of the two I mentioned, for live signal display
of wireless phones.  There are different kinds of displays that can be
switched upon the user's choice. The display contains complex Graphs and
linear curves.  The system should be stable enough to process the normalized
signal and display it as it comes/available.
Any advise related to this scenario is very much welcome.

Thanks

Re: Real-time graphics display Windows or Linux
By author:    sara snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Sarah Michael)
In newsgroup: comp.arch.embedded
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Sounds like Linux should fit your needs just fine.

    -hpa




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