re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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Linx4prs writes
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Personally, I think the next hot thing will be using FPGA to do some of the
embedded
system development.  Why bother with PIC/Basic stamps/dsp/80x86 plus a bunch
of
controllers/logic when a single FPGA can do that and more?  Yes, FPGA is
expensive now
but overtime - it will comes down.

If anyone is interest in playing with FPGA using Xilinx Virtex - take a look
at our DIMM module at
http://snaplogix.tripod.com





Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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Why design your own hardware at the gate level when you can buy a micro
with it already done and just write some code?

Ian


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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
Ian,

If you are using an FPGA, you generally don't design a processor, you use an
intellectual property" core that is a CPU.  If you are really lucky or
really dumb you get a good free core.  Otherwise you purchase (actually
rent) the intellectual property.  I say really dumb, because if you screw up
in the selection of a free core you are likely to get fired.  Also, real
microprocessors take a lot of area in an FPGA so they tend to be overpriced.
The positive side is that they can have all the support logic for almost
nothing.

That said, I like the free core from Xilinx (Pico Blaze - otherwise known as
the KCPSM.)  I have used it quite successfully and reliably.  It actually
comes from an excelent chap on your side oof the pond (Ken Chapman at
Xilinx)

Theron
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the
bunch
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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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Honestly, though, how realistic is this?  I have a similar background
myself, and I know from past software job interview experiences that
you're usually sitting across from some total drooling idiot who
wouldn't know a compiler from a blender (funny how it's the drooling
idiots who always end up controlling all the money, isn't it?)  In the
programming world, at least, the only way to get so much as a
consideration is either a college degree (specifically in programming)
and some specific experience (listed on your resume) with the specific
technology they use.  Case in point... I was once turned down for a
position because they used Visual C++ 4.2 and my Visual C++ experience
was with 5.0 (I swear I'm not kidding).

What are the honest odds of a "self taught" embedded systems developer
actually getting paid to develop embedded systems?  Do the people who
hire embedded systems developers pay attention to what you can
actually do, regardless of background?  If so, it must be a nice world
to live in.

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
On 19 Jul 2003 08:22:25 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@travelocity.com (Joshua Davies)

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Yes it is, and it's called freelancing - you get paid because you can deliver
the results.

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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Thanks, Pete. I think I'll take your advice and try to work around the
HR people and try to find ways to network directly with the Engineers
and their management. I'm a frelance software contractor and in my
experience those people seem quick to look at one's real ability.

Phil

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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been

I'm seeing this issue a lot more now than a few years ago, probably because
more people are applying for a slot now than before and the harried
engineering manager will take advantage of the HR group to prescreen the
candidates.

When I ran into this issue before, I was happy to let myself get weeded out
because my take was that I didn't want to work for a company with such
broken hiring procedures.  Sadly, I need the work now and can't blithely
ignore the current situation.  My solution has been to add bullet lists of
the skills I used for each previous employer on my resume.  Hopefully, this
will help me get through the HR screening and talk to someone who can
actually understand my skill set.

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was

Ditto here.  While direct experience is great to see on a candidate's
resume, I like to see evidence that the person can deal with new concepts
and be a good member of the team.  Additionally, I tend to like to hire
people that I think I can learn something from, even if I'm filling a junior
slot.

Kelly



Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
snipped-for-privacy@travelocity.com (Joshua Davies) wrote in message
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I'm a freelance software developer (contractor) and I manage to get
assignments based on a history of learning new skills very rapidly and
applying the context of what I already know to the new skills area.
Many people take me on a trial basis and, so far, everyone has opted
to keep me on the job until completion. I find professional
introductions into new areas like this difficult sometimes, but once
I'm in front of someone competent they seem to be able to determine my
level of ability, knowlege and attitude pretty quickly. I have
confidence in THEM jsut as I ask for their confidence in me. It works
:)

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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Unfortunately the answer is the odds are very small.  I spent many years
recruiting embedded development engineers.  The problem from the
recruiter's point of view is sorting the wheat from the chaff.  When you
get over 50 CVs a day to read from agencies or replies to job adverts,
you have to develop some scheme to decide which candidates are worth
interviewing.  I would read every CV right through but I was mainly
looking for two things:

1.  Basic level of education i.e a good degree
2.  Evidence of relevant experience


As a rule, unless a candidate was good in both criteria I would reject
them.  Only if they were exceptional in just one category would I
consider them.  That said I would be more likely to select an
educationaly gifted person with little experience than the other way
round.  The reason is that someone well qualified is clearly able to
learn.  The w ll experienced unqualified candidate often comes unstuck
the first time some heavy theory is needed in their work.

Ian


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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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I am self-taught in electronics, embedded stuff, programming, and lasers
and optics.

I get paid to work on all these things.  But of course, I also have a
college degree, in sociology.

:-D

Just kidding.  Seriously, it's in chemistry with a math minor.

You're probably right about the college degree, but with one in an
appropriately technical field, one might be able to move around the
disciplines fairly freely.


Good day!


--
_______________________________________________________________________
Christopher R. Carlen
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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
Thank you, John. I looked at your product line and surfed a whole
intro and tutorials for PLDs, CPLDs, FPGAs, etc. I think they'd make a
valuable addition to my newly acquired knowledge of PICs & TINIs, but
I'll stay focused first on the microcontrollers where I can leverage
my knowlege of C, C++, Java and develop a good working knowledge of a
couple of uC assembly languages. Then I'll do something relatively
simple with a PLD as a sort of level between, say, a PIC and discrete
components ...

Thanks again :)

Phil Schlesinger

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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architectures quickly, this
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processor,and learning new
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adapt would be better
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Thanks a lot, Mike. This sounds like very good advice and I'll take it
to heart. I've decided to start with the Microchip PIC in assembly
language using the free MPLAB and move on from there. I'll learn
enough quickly and cheaply to figure out what I need to know next ...
and then branch out to another low-level processor, but perhaps using
C. Thanks again :)

Phil Schlesinger

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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FPGA are interesting, but currently with micros we are seeing a
reduction in the cost-to-performance ratio as well as an increase in
the feature set. It's always advantageous for a contractor to increase
ones skill set  & FPGA do enjoy a niche market. However the engineers
that I know that are doing FPGA design and alike, were drawn into it
by an associated project, rather than on the onset, deciding to get
into it. Also with FPGA, one would need a strong hardware background
-- probably back to the grassroots, AND & OR gates.

Ken.

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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 16:13:50 -0400, "Theron Hicks"

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Hmm - don't know. I usually get a blank stare when I ask them what De
Morgan's Theorem is ;-)

I know that the tools are getting a lot smarter, but I still consider
FPGA's to be in the realm of the Hardware Engineers.

Ken.

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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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As 1 in three MCU in the world is an 8051 it is obvious.


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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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the
bunch
look

- plus it should keep you from competing for jobs, by using a 25 year old
obsolete part
(go 8051 if you want to get paid)



Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities

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Hmmm - showing my age here, but I thought the 8051 was introduce (by
Intel) in 1980 and the 68HC11 in 1985. This would make the humble 8051
23 years young & still kicking ;-)

Ken.

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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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<snip
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 Yes, but the 80C51 is still VERY active, with 6 of the top 10 semi
companies
in the world having 80C51 variants, and the 68HC11 has been NFND for
a while ( & the supplier of the HC11 just exited the Top 10 list ).

-jg

Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 16:44:14 +1200, Jim Granville

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Never meant to say that it wasn't ACTIVE -- just pointing out that the
8051 is actually OLDER than the 68HC11.

Ken.

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Re: Which Microcontrollers for job opportunities
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Isn't everything ARM these days?
I like ARM code by the way, looks like 6502 code to me.



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