Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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There's nothing special with embedded applications here.
It's just source code and it does not matter what source
code (from CAD files over hardware and software sources
to documentation).

Usually CVS is the tool to use here.

Regards,
Mario  


Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
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People should and will use whatever's available as long as it
integrates with their development environment.  Things like CVS, which
has the benefit of being free software, should be enough for all but
the most massive projects in embedded-dom, I think.  

Backups don't come even close to actual version management, mainly
because they don't give you a usable interface to document *what* each
version actually is, or *how* and *why* it was changed relative to its
predecessor.

You should still to backups and archival, of course --- but of the VC
software's repository files, not of individual work copies.
--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker ( snipped-for-privacy@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
On 2 Jul 2003 12:03:43 GMT, Hans-Bernhard Broeker

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All valid. It amazes me that such an investment in the source code is
not protected as a matter of course. As you have implied, it's the tip
of the iceberg -- we also use PVCS Tracker for bug tracking.

Ken.

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Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Visual Sourcesafe here.

Best Regards
John McCabe

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Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Clearcase here, PVCS in the previous job, used Visual SourceSafe before in a
previous life.



Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
H snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Yaakov) wrote in

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If you mean for the firmware written on the host destined for the embedded
device, of course. CVS is the cheap and quite capable choice for either
Windows or Linux based development.

--
- Mark ->
--

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Of course!

I used RCS for many, many years.  Most of the RCS users I know
have switched to CVS.  Now I use MS Visual Suck Safe.
Definitely a step down from RCS or CVS.  Other people I know
use perforce, or that other big commercial one with "VOBs"
(what's it called?).

Everybody I know who does embedded SW uses some sort of
revision control system.

--
Grant Edwards                   grante             Yow!  I'd like some JUNK
                                  at               FOOD... and then I want to
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Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
On Thu, 3 Jul 2003 14:25:42 +1200, "Charles Oram" <charles.oram@ xxxx
ericsson.co.nz> wrote:

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We're using Clearcase.
We have a really large, distributed development team, and it makes a
big difference.

As you said, if you have a small team, it's simpler (and *much*
cheaper) to use something like CVS.

Regards,
Allan.

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Or for Win32 there's WinCVS + cvsnt

http://www.wincvs.org
http://www.cvsnt.org/wiki

--
- Mark ->
--

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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We do casual backup to a server, which is CD-Rom backed up every
Friday for permanent archiving (in the cave under my garage.)

Version control is different: when a firmware version is "done", it is
formally packaged on a Zip or CD: all sources, batch files, related
FPGA config files, ROM image files, and a serious README.TXT
explaining the whole thing. All that is formally released to the
company library as a letter revision, treated exactly like an
engineering drawing... none of this silly 7.04b nonsense.
Manufacturing may only assemble a product from released drawings, as
called out on a released BOM. The master Zip or CD then goes into the
cave, too.

We also archive the tools (assemblers, compilers, FPGA stuff, etc)
used to produce any released firmware. That has prevented a few
near-nightmares in maintaining "old" (2 years or so) products.

John



Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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I'd like to think that everyone is using some sort of source version
control for their projects. Also it should be used routinely and not
just for nightly backups.

We use PVCS Version Manager, but SourceSafe, CVS, RCS are all
applicable.

Ken.

+====================================+
I hate junk email. Please direct any
genuine email to: kenlee at hotpop.com

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
H snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Yaakov) wrote in message
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Why would you not?

We use CS-RCS for VC and PR Tracker for defect tracking. Both cheap
and effective if a bit clunky.

TW

Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
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You mean is anyone not using formal version control systems for embeded
systems?
As embeded systems are usually difficult to upgrade to a new version - the
quality levels needed require one to use some sort of formal version control
(and configuration control).

We use Telelogic Synergy.

--
Stephen Baynes       CEng MBCS
DTG-S&S, Philips Semiconductors Southampton
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Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
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Point taken, Paul, but did it need to be in triplicate?

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com
http://www.sfdesign.co.uk



Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
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No problem. I misread it as being an ad posted 3 times - mea culpa ;).

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com
http://www.sfdesign.co.uk



Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
           snipped-for-privacy@DELETEMEfivetrees.com "steve at fivetrees" writes:

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Apparently a change at Demon meant that multi-line newsgroup lists
weren't being processed properly.

--
********************************************************************
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Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems
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Bizarre.


Heh. Give my regards to Niall ;). I still have some examples of OO-C to give
him...

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com
http://www.sfdesign.co.uk



Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Even when working on a small script on my own, the ability to save versions
every few minutes if appropriate with a comment to say what was working,
what I'm about to do, just makes everything go much better. I can back out
changes, and delete sections (rather than just comment out) knowing that I
can get them back if needed.

I can't really imagine not using VC for anything.... They exist for DOS too
and can be just as easy to use.

--
Robert Cowham


Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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Well, different strokes. I can't imagine doing a separate backup every
few minutes, or what I would do with the resulting, say, 1500 backup
files that I'd generate during a 2-week-long embedded programming
project. I guess I'm old-fashioned: I think about the problem, write
the code, test it, release it, and I'm done.

My experience working with programs and organizations big and small is
that the fancier the tools, the worse the code.

John


Re: Version Control in Embedded Systems

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versions
out
I
too

That sounds funny, but my impression is the same.

I think the point of versions/backup/comment is to keep track of design
decisions and be able to backtrack when one is later proven incorrect.  1500
backup files isn't the case with a decent source control system.  It is just
1500
"deltas" which consist of maybe 50-500 characters each representing the
changes in the source for the new functionality which you detail in the
comment
you filed when  you made the backup.  You may even consolidate deltas over
version differences you don't want to keep track of, but it doesn't really
save much, just paper when printing out your version history.

Rufus











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