QNX Acquired by Harman

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View

QNX Acquired by Harman

OTTAWA & WASHINGTON, October 27, 2004 - QNX Software Systems
today announced it has accepted an offer of purchase from
Harman International Industries, Incorporated (NYSE: HAR).
As the newest subsidiary in Harman International’s family of
premium brands, including Harman Kardon, JBL, and Becker,
QNX will now be well-positioned to accelerate its growth
toward becoming the preferred operating system for advanced
embedded applications.

Of key value to Harman International is the QNX Neutrino
realtime operating system (RTOS), the company’s flagship
product. QNX Neutrino is widely held as the world’s most
advanced operating system and is ideally suited for the next
generation of complex computing devices in many markets.
Both QNX and Harman see an expanding role for the RTOS and,
within the automotive market in particular, share a vision
for establishing QNX Neutrino as the de facto standard for
the industry. By bringing QNX under the Harman umbrella,
both companies will be able to contribute to this process,
speeding the pace of innovation in the industry.

The agreement comes at a time when sophisticated software
systems are becoming the cornerstone of a steadily
increasing number of integrated devices, ranging from
infotainment systems to smart phones to networking gear.
Maintaining leadership in operating system technology
requires a continued commitment to innovation, strategic
partnerships, industry standards, and intensive customer
support. With Harman as a parent company, QNX will continue
its leadership in all of these critical areas, pushing the
industry forward as a whole and ensuring that its entire
customer base benefits from its new resources and influence.

Under the terms of the agreement, QNX will operate as a
separate division led by its existing management team,
including co-founder and CEO Dan Dodge. All of QNX’s offices
and operations will stay in place and continue to be
dedicated to serving and growing QNX’s target markets,
including automotive, networking, medical instrumentation,
and industrial control. As is the established practice in
other Harman International subsidiaries, QNX will continue
to provide advanced software and engineering services to all
of its existing customers, including Harman’s competitors.

"My vision for QNX remains steadfast. We will remain the top
brand for OS reliability, the proving ground for innovation,
and a fiercely customer-centric organization," said Dan
Dodge, CEO of QNX. "Together with Harman, we will continue
our leadership, setting new standards for performance and
reliability that will benefit embedded developers, OEMs, and
consumers across all industries."

"With its deep experience in the automotive, networking,
medical, and general embedded markets, QNX brings a rich
portfolio of technology and expertise to the Harman family,
creating new synergies and market opportunities," said
Bernard Girod, CEO of Harman International Inc. "We are
excited to contribute to QNX’s ongoing growth and success,
at a time when the need - and demand - for its operating
system technology is accelerating worldwide, from North
America to Europe to the Pacific Rim."

About QNX Software Systems
With millions of installations worldwide, QNX Software
Systems is the global leader in realtime, microkernel
operating system technology. Companies like Cisco,
DaimlerChrysler, Harris, Panasonic, Siemens, and General
Electric rely on QNX technology to build ultra-reliable
systems for the networking, automotive, medical, military,
and industrial automation markets. Founded in 1980, QNX
Software Systems maintains offices throughout North America,
Europe, and Asia. Visit http://www.qnx.com .

About Harman International
Harman International Industries, Incorporated
(www.harman.com) is a leading manufacturer of high-quality,
high fidelity audio products and electronic systems for the
consumer and professional markets. The company’s stock is
traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol: HAR.

Editorial Contact
Paul Leroux
QNX Software Systems
+1 613 591-0931
snipped-for-privacy@qnx.com

QNX and Neutrino are registered trademarks of QNX Software
Systems Ltd. in certain jurisdictions. All other trademarks
and trade names belong to their respective owners.

Source: [ http://www.openqnx.com/Article337.html ]

--
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com


Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

What puffery! Inside the walls at QNX, maybe. It might even
be best by many objective measures, but "widely held", I
don't think so.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Too late. It's called Linux, and it got there neither by
being the best nor smallest nor fastest, nor anything else-est.
Can you figgur out why?

Nothing against QNX except their puffery. I used to use it
before I found Linux.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman


Quoted text here. Click to load it


Of course it's puffery.  That's what press releases are.
Don't expect datasheet-style accuracy written by engineers
in something intended for investors and written by marketing.

I don't know about "widely held", but QNX Neutrino is arguably
the world’s most advanced operating system.  Alas, it isn't
a *general purpose* operating system.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

QNX or QNX Neutrino?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You used it for what?  As a general-purpose operating system or
as a real-time operating system?  If the latter. which flavor of
Embedded Linux did you use?

BTW, you shouldn't quote the entire post you are replying to.

--
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com


Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I was a little quick on the post. I see that their PR was limited
to the RTOS domain. QNX (not Neutrino) used to be POSIX+microkernel+
almost real time. It tried very hard to be POSIX and to support boatloads
of hardware, most of which it did OK. Linux has always done much better,
minus the real-time component.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Our designs prefer logic machines to accomplish the hard-time stuff,
and non-real-time OS to support the higher level functions,
and to keep the hardware fed. And of course, where logic is insufficient,
we program sans OS, as God intended.





Re: QNX Acquired by Harman


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not a bad methodology, unless you have a competitor who is using
Forth on a uC -- if that ever happens you won't be able to beat
the competition in the areas of time-to-market, system cost, or
development cost. Then again, you might have a competitor who is
using Windowws CE, in which case he is the one who won't be able
to beat yiu in the areas of time-to-market, system cost, or
development cost.



Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

What's your base for such a statement? I am starting to evaluate it for
some designs. What about LynxOS (my other candidate) ?


Regards.

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Your use of the phrase "some designs" leads me to believe that
you are looking for an embedded OS and possibly a RTOS.  If
you were talking about a general purpose OS I would expect to
see you talking about office suites and support for the latest
games on the latest videocards.  

Look at http://www.qnx.com /.  They aren;t pushing it as something to
replace Windows XP or Linux on the desktop, but rather as something
to put inside routers and DVD platers.

Now look at http://www.lynuxworks.com /. They are pushing it for
avionics, not general purpose use.

If you don't need real-time and your application is to run on a
standard desktop PC used by a typical user - general purpose
computing - Linux is a better choice IMO.

For real-time embedded applications, QNX and LynxOS are both fine
choices.




Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Actually, both. :-)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sorry. My quote induced you to think my question regarded the "general
purpose" statement but it was about "the world's most advanced operating
system" statement.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They are AFAICT closer to general system than other RTOSes (VxWorks,
Integrity etc.) in the sense one can use them as development hosts and
even run some desktop like applications on them (Lynx has a compatibilty
layer for linux applications - I wonder how well it works.) For
applications that involve graphics display of information and data
recovery on a networked system (bedside monitors from which one could
retrieve patients data for instance) they seem to provide an easier path
to final product than some other RTOSes (again VxWors, Integrity etc.)
that need third party componentes to perform the same tasks. I wonder
how good are their development tools though.

Regards.


Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You want Linux to deploy your airbag or control your steer-by-wire
steering? Good luck, I'll take QNX. For word processing, compiling, or web
hosting, Linux is fine.

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Actually, I'll take hardwired logic for airbag control, and raw code on
silicon for super real-time problems.


Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I am not familiar with QNX, but Linux is by no stretch of the
imagination an RTOS.  There have been moves to run Linux under an
elementary RTOS, or to give it a measure of the capabilities of an
RTOS.  

The requirements of an RTOS and a general purpose OS are not really
compatible.  For example, the GPOS need not succeed in avoiding
indefinite postponement under all circumstances, but the RTOS must
absolutely guarantee process service in a specified time quantum.
This also means a difference in the means of dealing with deadlock
(deadly embrace).  A GPOS can afford to let an operator resolve it,
the RTOS cannot.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Can you give several examples of how QNX 6 handles deadlocks (different
kinds of)?

Let's leave aside POSIX EDEADLK return code when someone tries to lock the
mutext twice.

Thank you,
Roman




Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

http://www.qnx.com/developers/docs/momentics621_docs/neutrino/sys_arch/kernel.html#SCHEDULING
http://www.qnx.com/download/download/8123/QNX_Neutrino_620_Evaluation_Report.pdf

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Let's not. :)

http://www.qnx.com/download/download/9870/posix_for_embedded_systems.pdf
http://www.qnx.com/developers/docs/momentics621_docs/neutrino/sys_arch/kernel.html#SYNCHRO

Also see:

http://www.qnx.com/download/download/8085/Realtime_or_Real_Linux_A_Realistic_Atlernative.pdf
http://www.qnx.com/download/download/8122/QNX_Neutrino_62_vs_RedHat_Embedded_Linux.pdf
http://www.qnx.com/download/download/8124/QNX_Neutrino_v61_vs_VXAE_and_WinCE.pdf
http://www.qnx.com/download/download/8090/What_is_Realtime_and_Why_Do_I_Need_It.pdf
http://www.qnx.com/developers/docs/momentics621_docs/neutrino/sys_arch/kernel.html

Note: I have no connection to QNX other than having managed a project that used
it.

--
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com


Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Hi CBFalconer,

Quoted text here. Click to load it
under all circumstances, but the RTOS must absolutely guarantee process service
in a specified time quantum.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
That's exactly the point. If an interrupt latency cannot be
hard-specified to xx microseconds or even milliseconds it is not an RTOS
I would use. With QNX I was quite impressed when it came to this  issue,
also with the knowledgeable staff up there. I am pretty good in crashing
applications under all kinds of OS flavors. I tried my best with our QNX
app but it was like kicking an oak tree, it didn't budge a bit and just
kept running.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
embrace).  A GPOS can afford to let an operator resolve it, the RTOS cannot.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Well, an RTOS can. Once. From then on the victim's lawyers might take
the lead.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it
postponement under all circumstances, but the RTOS must absolutely guarantee
process service in a specified time quantum.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I don't know what you are doing to mung quotations from me, but
anything I wrote was limited to 65 char lines.  You are converting
them into something that far exceeds standards.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Hi CBFalconer,

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Sorry, sometimes my newsreader (Mozilla) does that and I have no clue
why. It happens sporadically and it also mungs my text as well at times.
Had tried Netscape before but the problems were much worse. Also, I
tried both on very different PCs. Same thing.

BTW, I have it set to 65 characters in the setup menu.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

here additional 2 articles of the Ottawa Business Journal
http://www.ottawabusinessjournal.com/281777372611416.php

and Ottawa Citizen
http://www.canada.com/ottawa/ottawacitizen/news/business/story.html?id=e08aa551-999d-4a32-a83b-6494d72a0543


Jutta Steinhoff
STEINHOFF Automation & Fieldbus-Systems

Re: QNX Acquired by Harman

Quoted text here. Click to load it

"We get the capital we need now to compete with Microsoft, rather
than wait four or five years"
                                 -- QNX Chief executive Dan Dodge

--
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com



Re: QNX Acquired by Harman
Quoted text here. Click to load it
http://www.canada.com/ottawa/ottawacitizen/news/business/story.html?id=e08aa551-999d-4a32-a83b-6494d72a0543
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you're going to dream, might as well dream big...

Scott



Site Timeline