Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]

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Reading this thread, I was kind of curious as to the "state of play" of the
major languages - a web search revealed quite a useful site ...

http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm

... which shows that there hasn't been a *huge* change in quite a while.
Although I was kind of surprised to see the fairly recent dip in Java.

-Pete.
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Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]

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Considering some of the other oddball languages they list I am surprised
they hadn't listed Forth (which on the same basis of their published
calculation method came above Prolog).

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Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]
On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 20:40:38 +0100, "Paul E. Bennett"

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They do.  Scroll down a bit.  It's number 26 at 0.130%.  Which puts it
ahead of Ruby, Tcl/Tk, REXX, SmallTalk and Objective-C, but below
Postscript, RPG, Scheme, and AWK.

Prolog is number 18 at 0.259%.

Regards,

                               -=Dave
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Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]

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Amazing how I missed seeing it. I posted to the company as well folowing my
own search with the search parameters as they described and Forth came in
above Prolog (strange).

As they declare that they ignore values that are more than twice the
previous months figures then I am sure the results will occassionally be
less than those you might obtain on a trended plot (which takes into
account at least some of the peak). Might be interesting to take ones own
month by month census. I suppose.

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Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]
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It is amazing what is a passed off as 'science' these days.

At least on googlefight, you know it is fun/nonsense, but these
guys try and dress it up as information ?!

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They did, but placed it at #26.

Some examples on googlefight

Forth Programming     versus    Prolog Programming
(1 180 000 results)             ( 266 000 results)

The winner is: Forth Programming

C# Programming        versus   Pascal Programming
(1 500 000 results)        ( 945 000 results)
                Delphi Programming
                (1 320 000 results)
    
Makes Delphi/Pascal a clear winner over C# ?

There does seem to have been a trend-decline in Java, so I wondered
if it was the .NET gaining ground, as the .NET languages seem to
have increased. Delphi and Visual Basic both went up, and C#
drifted a little.


So we try this on googlefight:

Java Programming     versus        .NET Programming
(6 520 000 results)            (8 990 000 results)

The winner is:    .NET Programming

-jg


Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]
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I think what's even more hilarious is that VHDL is in the list at number 48,
right below Visual Foxpro at number 47. I wonder if I can do my next FPGA
project in Visual Foxpro instead of VHDL? Or perhaps I should use Logo, it's
at number 29!

Re: Programming Language Usage [was: C 99 compiler access]
On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 09:08:43 +1200, Jim Granville

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Considering what people in the business world use to make predictions
and descisions, then the "information" provide on the above site can
be considered to be an extremely accurate estimation of language
popularity.  If they can now somehow just use exactely the same
information to show the opposite trend, then they have the makings
of business gurus. :)

Regards
   Anton Erasmus

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