PCI LVDS cards

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Does anyone know of any PCI cards that have LVDS ports? I have
a requirment to communicate between 2 PC's over a point to
point connection at 33Mbps. Other then LVDS what comm protocal
supports these speeds? (I know USB does, but I have not found
a USB host<-->host bridge that supports those speeds.)

Thanks!
-larry


Re: PCI LVDS cards
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What's ruling out plain old 100baseT Ethernet?

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker ( snipped-for-privacy@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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Please excuse my ignorance, but exactly how would that work?
Would I have to talk TCP/IP? Or can I just open the "port"
can read and write raw data (like I do with a serial port).
Thanks!
-larry


Re: PCI LVDS cards
[Please try to respect F'up2 reduction...]


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Well, as the saying goes --- if you have to ask, you're most not in a
state to do something useful with the answer.

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Have to: no. But you could.

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Depends on what OS you're talking about.  "Ports" are a TCP/IP
concept, mainly.  You could use them, but may need to go below that.

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker ( snipped-for-privacy@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

Re: PCI LVDS cards
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Sorry, I have no idea what that means.

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If the answer was useful I'm sure I could have done something with it.

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I'd rather not. I'd rather keep this as simiple as communicating over
a serial port on a RS-232 cable

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do

The system I am buiding will be running On Time's RTOS-32 OS. I also
have to build a host emulator that will talk to my system. For that I
can use anything I want, and I was hoping to use Linux (but if I had
to use Windows I would).

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What about serial ports and parallel ports?

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Again, I ask: how can I use ethernet for direct point to point
communication between 2 computers?


Re: PCI LVDS cards
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ethernet does not need anything else than point to point...no switches
or routers of whatever kind. but: the transition from point2point to a
true network is "for free"...and this is exactely one of the strong
points speaking *in favour* of ethernet/ip.

when it comes to the *protocol* to be used i would strongly recommend:

-ip
-on top of it: tcp or udp, depending on your detailed requirements
-also, think about using a true application protocol on top of tcp.

what using tcp/ip, delivery of data is guaranteed. this is not
necessarily the case when using plain serial point2point.
also: from my (subjective, of course) point of view the real hard stuff
is designing a meaninful, stable application protocol...and this you
have to do no matter if you work "serial" or "ip".



michael

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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For the hardware use a cross over cable.

For the software on the server computer create a socket and get it to listen
to a port. The client then requests a connection to be made. The server
accepts the connection. Then write all the data that you want. This link
http://pandonia.canberra.edu.au/ClientServer/socket/socket.html tells you
everything that you need to get started.

Peter



Re: PCI LVDS cards

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listen
server
link
you
Thanks much! This was very useful info.

-larry


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That's rather unlikely to work.  The speed gap between usual RS232
connections and 33 Mbit/s one necessitates some changes in handling.
In particular, sending byte by byte becomes quite impractical.

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Cross-over cable, and knowledge.  If you couldn't guess the former on
your own, you need to brush up a lot on the latter.

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker ( snipped-for-privacy@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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This is a suboptimal idea as the common mode of LVDS is
extremely small. Go for a 100MBit LAN.

Rene
--
Ing.Buero R.Tschaggelar - http://www.ibrtses.com
& commercial newsgroups - http://www.talkto.net

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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What does this mean? What is the "common mode of LVDS"?

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If I could I would. The customer is fixated on LVDS for some
reason. I did find a LVDS PCI card - it's the CDa card from EDT:

http://www.edt.com/pcicda.html
Does anyone have any experience with this card?

-larry


Re: PCI LVDS cards

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Sorry. The common mode voltage range of LVDS is in the order of less
than one volt. Meaning, the GND of the innvolved card require to be
within less than 1 Volt. This means you have to take the chassis
potential with a thicker cable.

Rene
--
Ing.Buero R.Tschaggelar - http://www.ibrtses.com
& commercial newsgroups - http://www.talkto.net

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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Check out http://www.stargen.com and look at StarFabric products.

TC



Re: PCI LVDS cards
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Thanks, the uppper end FPGAs do have these links as standard.
But as said, it won't reach far and the common mode voltage
is critical.

Rene

Re: PCI LVDS cards

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StarFabric uses 8b10b encoded data and ac-coupling (which addresses the
common mode voltage concerns). It works at distances of about 40 feet with
low cost CAT-5 cables.

Effective data throughput is about 1.6 Gbps bi-directionally. In other
words, you can transmit and recieve > 1.6 Gbps (200 MBytes/sec) at the same
time provided you have a fast enough PCI bus.

Obviously, a 32-bit 33 MHz PCI bus limits throughput (total of Tx + Rx) to a
little over100 MBytes/sec (800 Mbps).

Tx = Transmit, and Rx = Receive

TC



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