On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market - Page 3

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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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I once turned paper found in my wallet into a fully functioning HP41CV.



mike

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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I wish a had a nickle for every engineer or hobbyist who wanted to
recreate an old CPU design.  Or better yet, a line of fully debugged
and documented code on a new project with real world application.

I thought I was going to have a lot of free time this summer to work
on an open source hardware design, but my time has not been so free
after all.  But if anyone is sitting around bored and wants to
participate, I would love to have some moral support if not good,
solid planning and design work.  I want to develop an open source GPS
receiver.  The main goal is to allow a variety of sources of data to
be used rather than being locked into maps from the GPS vendor.  I've
been inspired by USAPhotoMaps and OpenStreetMaps.

I'm not trying to knock retro-projects.  I'm just saying I'd like to
work on something closer to state of the art.

Rick

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
Hi Rick,

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I think that's a great idea, but personally I'd be happy if I could simply
*buy* a program like Street Atlas USA for Linux... and that means including
high-quality maps of the U.S.  AFAIK the problem is that the commercial map
guys like NavTeq and TeleAtlas are only willing to sell their maps to folks
who'll take reasonable precautions to prevent the data from being trivially
copied into other programs.  (I don't know it for a fact, but I suspect the
map databases in Street Atlas, Street & Trips, etc. are encrypted -- otherwise
someone would have written an "extractor" by now so that such data could be
used by the Linux mapping applications.)

The OpenStreetMaps guys seem to be doing a pretty good job, though... perhaps
eventually they will be an acceptable replacement for the commercial
alternatives.

---Joel


Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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Don't know about Linux, but I use USAPhotoMaps for Windows.  It uses
the old USGS data available at the replacement for terraserver.com,
don't recall the URL off the top of my head.  What's the big deal
needing Linux?  None of that is very portable.  When I need directions
or am geocaching or in my kayak, I don't want to have to break out a
laptop.  I want something to replace the proprietary crap they sell
for GPS receivers, not a simple map program on a PC.

Rick

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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I guess it's more or less expected with open-source hardware designs.  Why
bother going to open-source hardware the application you meant for it requires
the purchase of a commercial OS? -- You might as well buy closed-sourced
hardware at that point, as there are plenty of perfectly good single-board
computers that run Windows or QNX or other commercial OSes.

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Actually I think that the majority of GPS navigation systems (the aftermarket
ones for cars) run Linux -- they just license the maps directly from TeleAtlas
or NavTech, and have the volume/money to make it viable.

---Joel


Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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Why

We are not on the same page here.  I'm not talking about a PC.  I'm
talking about a GPS device... a handheld GPS device.  It won't be
running Windows or Linux.  Trying to power a device running Linux is a
loosing battle.  How long does an Android cell phone actually run on a
charge.  I don't mean sleep, I mean run!  My GPS receivers run for 12
hours and they are 10 year old technology!  A modern GPS receiver
needs to run for 20 hours or more to be competitive.  Any OS that
requires so much memory that it needs an MMU is not an option in a
truly hand held device.

Rick

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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http://www.gpsfiledepot.com /
has free topo maps. These can be loaded on garmin gear.

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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Definitely.  Somebody who does home/hobby projects probably enjoys the
work.  People who like what they're doing are always a step ahead of
those who don't.

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It depends on the classes.

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That would win points as well.

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Everybody's got to eat...

--
Grant Edwards               grant.b.edwards        Yow! I'm having a
                                  at               tax-deductible experience!
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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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My question isn't so much do they do it all the time for a hobby -- I
would certainly look favorably on someone who's been a radio amateur, or
who's been building Lego robots since they came out or something like that.

I'm talking more of the folks who peel themselves away from the Wii just
long enough to do some "embedded" project _just because_ it's embedded
and they want a job.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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I'll second that.


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That would be delivering lip service on the part of the candidate. No, I
would not hire if I found out there's no depth. But there it usually
doesn't matter whether it was a hobby project or classes. I know people
who have passed classes at our university with flying colors yet cannot
even repair simple electronics. Not so good.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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I suppose they get partial credit.  They're behind people with geeky
hobbies, but ahead of people who didn't even bother making a PIC blink
an LED.

--
Grant Edwards               grant.b.edwards        Yow! Like I always say
                                  at               -- nothing can beat
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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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It really depends on the project.  If they take the project, build it,
manufacture it, and sold it at ham fests and other places, then that
would be plus.  If they were doing something interesting and unusual,
or especially difficult, that would also be a plus.  If it was really
simple and basic, but they had to learn a whole new toolset that is
applicable to a new job, then it would also be a plus...

Charlie

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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I'm currently hiring for my company. A hobby in the field is big plus for me,
especially for people with short work history. It tells me that they're in the
art for passion, not just because of good job.

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Getting from Wii to a working embedded system, however small, may show
at least capability of learning. Not as good as a hobby, but a plus.

We're constantly doing projects where we do things we've never done before,
so the learning capability is an absolute must in my business.

--
Mikko OH2HVJ

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
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snip


Boy, it's nice to see someone in a position to hire saying that.  I've
seen all too many people who are trying to do something unique, yet
can't gather the courage to go hire someone unless they've done exactly
that never-before-done thing.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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...with ten years experience doing the never-been-done-before thing with
hardware that's two years old.

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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   And 18 months on parts released, within this week?

  In 1996, while interviewing for a job I was told that one of the
requirements was 15 years experience with Win 95.  I pointed out that
they were fools, and walked out.  They weren't around for long.  I guess
they couldn't find enough experienced people. :)

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 21:40:50 -0400 "Michael A. Terrell"

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Hey, that's almost possible. After all, it's just MS-DOS with a GUI
glommed on the top.

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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wrote:
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before,
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   Sure it is.  There was no 'registry' in DOS.

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market
On Thu, 26 Aug 2010 08:59:20 -0400 "Michael A. Terrell"

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wrote:
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before,
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OK, so there's a bug that MS-DOS didn't have.

Re: On Home Projects as a Reentry into the Job Market

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Since they came out? The Lego set must have been found in the closet.




mike

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