MSP430 JTAG

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Hi everybody. I am working with a development platform based in the msp430
and I am looking for different programming tools. I tried the JTAG but thi
is too big. it takes up to 14 pins of space. So I hope that somebody ca
make a suggestion about other solutions, or other version of JTAG tha
take up less space.

Re: MSP430 JTAG
Hi everybody. I am working with a development platform based in the msp430
and I am looking for different programming tools. I tried the JTAG but thi
is too big. it takes up to 14 pins of space. So I hope that somebody ca
make a suggestion about other solutions, or other version of JTAG tha
take up less space.

Re: MSP430 JTAG
@yahoo.com says...
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Every member of the MSP430 family has a Boot Serial Loader in mask ROM
on board that allows loading code serially with two pins.  You can not
debug via that interface, however.

The actual JTAG connection to the MSP only requires 4 pins plus power
and ground on all but the smallest devices; I have no idea where you
came up with 14.

--Gene

Re: MSP430 JTAG
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There is also the reset pin, so in total 7 pins are needed for msp430
jtag.  There are some other pins useful with certain msp430 chips (such
as oscillator pins), but they are not necessary for most devices.  The
14 pin connector is the "standard" connector for TI's jtag connectors,
and is therefore the one always used by tools.  To save a bit of space,
we tend to use the first 10 pins, and short-circuit lines 10 and 11 on
the jtag debugger cable to get a smaller connector with minimal changes
to the tools.  It is also possible to use a physically smaller 10 pin
(or 14 pin) connector, if you make the appropriate cables.

Using the boot loader is smaller - you just need ground, two
communications pins, and reset (if I remember rightly), if you don't
need debugging.


Re: MSP430 JTAG

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Ground , transmit, receive (these are NOT UART pins), reset and TEST or
one of the JTAG pins. Plus power if you want to power the RS232 level
shifter from the target, or power the target from the programmer. This
is sensible anyway as it makes it easy to match signal levels.

So that's 6 pins.

I tend to reserve the BSL pins where possible, they also make a useful
debug (bitbanged) serial port.

Paul Burke

Re: MSP430 JTAG
Thanks everybody, yours comments have been so useful. Now I want to do
deeper study about the JTAG, maybe you can recommend me some literatur
about this topic like the bible of the JTAG or some similar. I starte
with the IEEE std 1149.1

ok Thanks everybody see you later.

Re: MSP430 JTAG
says...
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You really only need 6 pins for the MSP 430 jtag interface.  I put them
all on a 2x3 2mm header and built an adapter to go to the standard
14-pin header.

Mark Borgerson


Re: MSP430 JTAG
Hello Mark,
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If that is still too big he could use a flex circuit connection. Or one
of those digital camera connectors where you can barely see the tiny
contacts.

I wonder when TI or someone else will come out with a "Bluetooth
programmable" micro. You compile, hit send and it's all 'beamed over'.
Wouldn't that be cool?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: MSP430 JTAG
Thanks everybody, yours comments have been so useful. now I want to do
deeper study about the JTAG maybe you can recommend me some literatur
about this topic something like the bible of the JTAG or some similar.
started with the IEEE std 1149.1

ok Thanks everybody see you later.


Re: MSP430 JTAG
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Have a look at the TI JTAG scan educator.
It's a dos program, very nice, and answers nearly every question about JTAG.

see:
http://focus.ti.com/docs/apps/catalog/resources/appnoteabstract.jhtml?abstractName=satb002a

MIKE

--
www.oho-elektronik.de
OHO-Elektronik
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Re: MSP430 JTAG
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it will be pretty cool and useless, MSP430 target low power
application, your wireless JTAG should take power from the target
wireless module will eat at least 15-20mA approx same for the micro
which will do the programming if you want high speed programing, so
your target should provide >30mA for this wireless JTAG, pretty much
for battery powered MSP430 apps

Best regards
Tsvetan
---
PCB prototypes for $26 at http://run.to/pcb (http://www.olimex.com/pcb )
PCB any volume assembly (http://www.olimex.com/pcb/protoa.html )
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Re: MSP430 JTAG
Hello Tsvetan,

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It's not meant for regular transfers. Think about this scenario: You
have a bunch of devices that you want to reprogram in the field.
Connectors are often ruled out because it's too much hassle, too much
dirt around, or you don't have any skilled personnel to do it. Now you
provide a little unit where all they have to do is place each device
into a cradle, or somewhat close to it. Hold it there until a beep
happens, done. Now you have a 'new' device.

If weak batteries are a concern you could program in bursts short enough
to only require the energy stored in a little electrolytic capacitor on
VCC. Or you could supply the target device via inductive coupling if it
absolutely has to be fast.

There is a whole slew of other application such as smart cards and so
on. Things where the card has to execute code. Or electricity meters in
rural areas. You could reprogram the flash via such an interface even if
the power is currently out. For example if a subscriber has signed up
for a different day/night discount rate where the use of certain
appliances such as air conditioners has to be blocked during some hours.
When we had that a guy had to come into the house, crack the seal, set
the times and then affix a new seal. This can be avoided.

Another potential application area are motes. If these have to be
configurable (they usually have to) or if you need them to perform
different functions on various jobs there has to be a means to reprogram
them without connectors. Connectors are often the main source of
reliability problems.


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I am using some of your header boards. They are great.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

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