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Re: looking for a god editor

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Gets my vote as well.

But it is now owned by borland
http://www.codewright.com /
and is being used in the newer versions of their products.

They also bought togethersoft.

Alex

Re: looking for a god editor

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Frank...

My personal favorite is nedit (needs an X server); but emacs is
popular and available for many platforms. For MS/Win use I like gvim.
--
Morris Dovey
West Des Moines, Iowa USA
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Re: looking for a god editor
On Tue, 2 Sep 2003 13:03:14 +0200, "Frank Mikkelsen"

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Not freeware but:

No one has mentioned Multi Edit - mind you I'm still
using the DOS version.

And what's wrong with DOS?! :)

Mike Harding

PS. Actually I think there is a (cut down) freeware version?


Re: looking for a god editor
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I second the use of multi edit.  It has just about everything a
programmer could need, except cafinated coffee.  I'm using version 7.11.
  'Haven't heard of a free version.
Matt Meerian


Re: looking for a god editor

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Multi Edit Lite - I note the Multi Edit website doesn't mention
it these days but a Google turned it up on Simtel at:

http://www.simtel.iif.hu/pub/pd/44655.html

I can't recall if it's freeware or shareware. It was pretty good
IIRC, lacked a spell checker and a few other bits but a decent
basic programmers editor.

Mike Harding


Re: looking for a god editor
Hi Frank,

U should tage a look at SourceInsight ...

http://www.sourcedyn.com/index.html
not free - but worth every penny (249$)

rg,
j

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Re: looking for a god editor
snipped-for-privacy@mail.dk says...
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I would have to agree here.  Been watching the 'God Editor' thread for a
while, wondering whether to jump in and mention Source Insight or not.  
If you've ever used any editor that has a code analysis capability, you
will quickly find that they are in a different class to your usual
editors.  As soon as your project grows to more than about 5 files then
any of these tools (IMHO) blow away regular editors.  There are others
too (eg 1.Understand for C, 2.Development Assistant for C).  I have use
Source Insight for the last year, haven't used eg 1. for a year, haven't
used eg 2. for about 3 years.  So far Source Insight has proved to be
the cheapest and the most configurable. Using its regular expression
parsing capability you can even set it up to make sense of assembler
projects.  I took a look at the Understand For C web site a couple of
weeks ago and I notice they are talking alot more about configurability
and adding new languages.  It may be worth another look soon.

Re: looking for a god editor
On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 00:35:39 GMT, Spiro

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What do you mean by 'code analysis' here?


Best Regards
John McCabe

To reply by email replace 'nospam' with 'assen'

Re: looking for a god editor
says...
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The way they work is you set up a group of files as a project (rather
than just edit individual files), then you 'parse' the project which
builds a database of crosslinks (between declarations of variables,
functions, header files, all uses and references of each variable etc).  
In normal operation, you work in a multi-windowed environment.  The main
window contains the file you are editing, the second (and optionally
third) contain auxiliary information about the identifier the cursor is
sitting on (whether its a variable, function, class, extern declaration
etc).  For example, once you have 'built' the project, then as your
cursor hits a variable name (for example), the second window will show
in real time a pretty graph of all the functions referring to that
variable, and the third window will display the relevant lines in the
file in which it was first declared.  For classes and functions you can
configure the info windows to show caller graphs or called by graphs.
Its all very configurable.  Once you get used to all the declaration and
reference info being available in real time right next to the edit
window, it becomes a powerful tool for getting up to speed with other
peoples code.  It's also very useful for understanding your own code as
the project grows in size (I suggested over about 5 files).  

I remember Understand for C has this cool feature where it would pick
out all functions that were not called by anything else.  Fast way of
finding main(), all interrupt handlers and dead code (or debug code).

You should now be able to make sense of any screen shots on the vendors
web pages.

Re: looking for a god editor
On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 23:49:41 GMT, Spiro

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I see. Basically in the same way as e.g. Microsoft Visual C++, TI Code
Composer Studio etc etc, except that the product you're suggesting
isn't targeted to a specific compiler.

In that case it may be worth looking at GPS. See:

http://www.gnat.com/texts/products/gps_set.htm

You'd have to read through the info though to find out how good it is
with C/C++, it's only just hit the streets and I know for sure that it
supports Ada.

John

Best Regards
John McCabe

To reply by email replace 'nospam' with 'assen'

Re: looking for a god editor

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Never used Teco in anger, though still have a Dec manual for it
somewhere. If emacs is arcane, then Teco is on another planet
altogether. Just understanding the manual requires a mental firmware
downgrade to that period in computing. Think asr33 teletype input
terminals is about the right frame of reference to get started :-).

I guess it does come down to personal preference and what you are most
familar with. All apps require an investment in time to get the best out
of, despite what I said earlier, but IMO, a good test of the usability
of any product is how far you can get without opening the manual. Was
spoilt using edt / vt220 on dec minis (mid eighties), which was a pretty
good full screen  editor for it's time. (Well in fact, light years ahead
of what was commonly available on unix) Prior to that, it was single
line editors on early development boxes and that really awefull editor
on hp minis and their editing terminals. What I really wanted was an edt
version for other machines and even invested in a s/hand dec keyboard
for a pc, just to get the correct keypad layout. Things have moved on
since then though and so have expectations in terms of ease of use.

You probably won't be convinced, but you might have a look at nedit:

http://www.nedit.org

Crisp, clean, open source and very solid. The only thing I need from it
that I haven't got round to looking up yet is how to load the mru file
list or part thereof on startup...

Chris

Re: looking for a god editor
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Not freeware, but very good (for win32):

Sourcecode and small text files, most hex files:  UltraEdit32
Large text files (>20MB):  Crisp
Large hex files, hd partitions, search for unicode text:  Winhex

These are the best tools I am aware of.

Marc

Re: looking for a god editor
jetmarc said for all posterity...
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I've been a happy user of UltraEdit32 for years.  


Casey

"It is easier to get older than it is to get wiser."

Re: looking for a god editor
what if God was one of us,
Just a programmer on the bus,
trying to debug his way home....

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