looking for a god editor

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
hello group
I am starting on a project where I use a compiler/linker without a
workbench. Are there someone there can recommend a multi window editor.
(freeware).

best regards
Frank Mikkelsen



Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

WRT SUBJECT LINE:  God's doing the best He can.  I don't think He'd
appreciate being edited.

Some of these may not be free, but very inexpensive:

couldn't find the original "The Programmer's Editor:, but found this:

 http://www.btinternet.com/~austinsoft/proged.htm

also

UltraEdit: http://www.ultraedit.com /

And I ran across this great list:

http://www.firthworks.com/roger/editors /

Rufus







Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I wonder if he wants the source code for the universe as well?

uni-gcc -O2 -Wall universe.c -o everything, 0.0000000000000000000001% complete

Re: looking for a god editor
Geoff McCaughan threw some tea leaves on the floor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Hahahahha!


--
              Kind Regards from Terry
    My Desktop is powered by GNU/LinuX, Gentoo-1.4_rc2  
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: looking for a god editor
Hi again
I am only looking for the editor running under windows, with multiple
windows, knowing the C syntax and possibility of integrating my own
compiler/linker.

Frank

Quoted text here. Click to load it
complete



Re: looking for a god editor
On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 08:48:20 +0200, "Frank Mikkelsen"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'd say Emacs is the one for you. C syntax highlighting, various
customisable indentation schemes, ability to compile from within Emacs
with outputs for various compilers capable of being parsed and
hyperlinked etc...


Best Regards
John McCabe

To reply by email replace 'nospam' with 'assen'

Re: looking for a god editor
On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 08:39:19 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@nospam.demon.co.uk (John

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'll second the Emacs suggestion.  That is, if you're willing to work
at it.  It's an extremely powerful tool with a difficult learning
curve.  It's capable of doing more than you need, but you'll probably
spend weeks (literally!) learning to use it well.  And it won't lock
you into (or out of) the Windoze platform.

XEmacs is probably friendlier out-of-the-box than GNU Emacs.

If you want something simpler, Programmer's Notepad (www.pnotepad.org)
is about the simplest.  You'll be up and running in less than a day
(maybe less than an hour), and it meets all your criteria above
(Editor, Windoze, C syntax highlighting, compiler integration)

FWIW, I use an older version of CodeWright.  I started using Unipress
Emacs back in 1984, switched to Brief in 1987 (because I couldn't find
a good Emacs for DOS), then on to CodeWright around 1993 (using Brief
keystroke emulation).  I was a big fan until they released v6.0, which
spit subdirectories of junk into my source directories and was the
first version of CodeWright ever to GPF on me.  I reverted to v5.1d,
and have never looked back.

Oh, and vi is a piece of wombat do.  Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: looking for a god editor
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Oh please, no, not the swiss army knife of editors. Who has the time to
learn the intricacies of an editor, no matter how good ?. An editor is a
basic tool that should work instinctively out of the box, just like a
screwdriver and has the minimum set of functions (edit, horiz and
vertical cut / paste, search / replace and syntax highlighting) and none
of the feature bloat that I never use anyway.

For windoze work, I use pfe (though no vertical cut/paste) and for unix,
nedit, which is about the neatest of all the editors i've used to date.

Agree about vi, but if you like emacs, then you must remember teco ?...

Chris

Re: looking for a god editor
On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:44:28 +0100, Chris Quayle

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The argument for Emacs (Escape-Meta-Alt-Control-Shift ;-) would be
that you'd only have to learn it once (or learn only one editor?).
Learn once,use everywhere.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you learn to use a tool well, it disappears.  Like a pencil.  But
learning a tol that well takes significant effort.  Ever seen a group
of Kindergarteners learning to use a pencil?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Part of the problem is that everyone's minimum feature set is
different from everyone else's.  One of the advantages of Emacs is
that it is likely to *have* whatever features are in your minimum set.
Edit? Sure.  Vertical cut/paste? Sure.  Newsreader?  Sure.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You might want to look at programmer's notepad.  From your
description, you would be very pleased.  At least with the version
that comes with WinAVR.  Column marking is done by holding the Alt key
while dragging.  Cut and paste works as expected.  Very well done,
actually...

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Nope.  TECO was before my time, though I have heard the history (Emacs
is really just shorthand for "Editor Macros" which were run under
TECO).  I started on Unipress Emacs for VAX/VMS in about 1984.  Prior
to that, the most advanced editor I had used was CREDIT on an MDS80
development system running ISIS.  Before that were severl different
line editors, including edlin on PCs and @ED,U on Exec-8.  I never
even used Wordstar...

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: looking for a god editor
Quoted text here. Click to load it

It all depends on your goals.  I'm a software developer, but I have a
claw hammer at home in my garage and it works just fine for my
occasional use.  But if I were a professional carpenter, I'd probably be
*very* unsatisfied with that particular hammer.  By the same token, as a
professional software developer, I appreciate the power and flexibility
of Emacs.  Would I recommend Emacs to a semi-computer-literate carpenter
for doing occasional text-editing tasks?  Of course not.  There's much
simpler text editors that would be easier to learn and work just a well
for his purposes.

But don't try and tell me that a professional software developer
shouldn't take the time to learn the intricacies of a powerful and
flexible editor.

You made the statement: "An editor is a basic tool that should work
instinctively out of the box...".  My response: only if you're a
dilettante.  A true professional can make very good use of that "feature
bloat" you refer to.

Tad

Re: looking for a god editor
Emacs = stone age

SlickEdit = state of the art and portable across platforms


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: looking for a god editor
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm going to assume that you meant to say:

SlickEdit = state of the art and *ALSO* portable across platforms

because I doubt that SlickEdit has been ported to as many platforms as
Emacs.

But beyond that, would you care to contrast SlickEdit with Emacs?

Tad

Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Having used Multi Edit extensively I would have to say that
I found Emacs quite difficult to learn (to a basic level) and
do much beyond simple editing. Like much of the unix world
it always had that feel that the people who wrote it said: "How
can we make this do lots of really clever things that no one
will ever want to do but make us look great because we can
write such complex stuff". Dons flame suit :)

Mike Harding


Re: looking for a god editor
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Me too. "Vi or die!"  :-)

Actually, I used vi/ed on Unix just because I knew how to do what I needed on
it. I learned vi when it was new at UC Berkeley.

Re: looking for a god editor
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Gary Kato) wrote in

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I always hated vi.  It just never felt right to me.  I prefer emacs to vi,
but, I like Codewright even more.  I don't need protability across
platforms at this time.

I still remember the good old days of whatever that line editor was on the
IBM 360 I used to code on.  Pretty amazing what you can accomplish with a
really good line editor.

--
Richard

Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Emacs.

Windows Platforms:   Windows XP, 2000, NT, Me, 98
UNIX      Platforms:   Linux, Solaris SPARC 2.6 , AIX 4.3.3.10,  HP-UX 11,
IRIX 6.5

Quoted text here. Click to load it

http://www.slickedit.com/products/pr_products.php




Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Compared to CodeWright, that's pretty impressive.

Compared to Emacs, that's pitiful.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Marketing gobbledygook.  "SlickEdit Inc. provides software developers
with the most comprehensive and flexible code editor you can use" --
phooey.  As close as this comes to contasting SlickEdit with Emacs is
the statement "It provides nine emulations (including VI and Emacs)."
Shoot, if I know Emacs, which is free, why should I buy SlickEdit?

I'm not saying SlickEdit is junk.  But nothing there convinces me that
it's better than Emacs.  Unless I need some of the platform-specific
features, like .NET integration...

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: looking for a god editor
On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 15:06:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Dave Hansen)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

At a [rather high] price.



Best Regards
John McCabe

To reply by email replace 'nospam' with 'assen'

Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

An editor is the most used tool a software developer employs.
In that light, its relatively inexpensive.




Re: looking for a god editor

Quoted text here. Click to load it

But infinitely more expensive than the one we're comparing it to here,
Emacs, which is probably superior in many ways.


Best Regards
John McCabe

To reply by email replace 'nospam' with 'assen'

Site Timeline