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Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
mnoone.uiuc.edu@127.0.0.1 says...
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Two main reasons, I suspect.
    - the first is simply that they were in the game early. The first
(I was aware of anyway) small package arm microcontroller (IE no external
bus).
    - Probably related to number one, they have developed a large self
supporting user community.

The three other small ARMS I'm aware of (Analog Deveices, ST and Atmel)
don't appear to be generally available yet but samples are.  They are
close enough to available that one of them may have started shipping
since I last checked.

Robert

Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
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devices,

Philiops has been out there with single chip flash processors for a few more
months
so people have more experience. Atmels SAM7S started sampling two months
ago so not so many have expericene.

If you go with the Atmel chips, you have a migration path up to the 200 MIPS
AT91RM9200.
The peripherals have changed somewhat since the first release of the
AT91M40400
but there are much more similarities, than differences.
You have a hard time doing that with most other companies ARM chips.

If you want to work with low end ARMs, thne you cannot get anything smaller
(and cheaper)
than the AT91SAM7S32.
There are free GNU C compiler and a Free IAR C compiler for it.
(Limited to 32kB; but who cares, when you only have 32kB ;-)
There are some new fancy low cost tools coming out in January from the AT91
Support
group but cannot tell more yet.

--
Best Regards,
Ulf Samuelsson   ulf@a-t-m-e-l.com
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Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
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That is a very good question.  I was looking for small ARM chips about
the time Philips announced their chip and they were not the first.
Atmel has had some good products for awhile and OKI had single chip
parts in production at that time.  But no one seems to notice the OKI
parts while the Philips parts took off like a rocket in the designer
groups.  Both parts are worthwhile.  So you be the judge.

--

Rick "rickman" Collins

snipped-for-privacy@XYarius.com
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Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?

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Oops - just wanted to clarify that I meant AVRISP, not AVRICE.

-Michael

Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 15:10:25 GMT, Michael Noone

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You can reflash the Philips LPC2xxx ARMs over a serial line using
the free tools from the Philips site
  semiconductors.philips.com

There is a variety of free, low cost and commercial ARM compilers
for a number of languages. For low cost hardware/software, see
  www.mpeltd.demon.co.uk/
    tiniarm.htm
    usbstamp.htm

Stephen

--
Stephen Pelc, snipped-for-privacy@INVALID.mpeltd.demon.co.uk
MicroProcessor Engineering Ltd - More Real, Less Time
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Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 15:10:25 GMT, Michael Noone

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I had the same question recently. I ended up using the free
codesourcery compiler. I have the eb40a board and a Nohau JTAG device
to control it. It comes with a software interface called seehau. This
is not the cheapest JTAG device, however. The eb40a board is pretty
inexpensive. I got mine from digikey.

I'm very impressed with the free codesourcery gnu compiler so far.

I have some simple example source code at www.toadhaul.org/arm.php

I will soon put up another example with interrupt-driven serial i/o
and a second timer interrupt.

Paul


Re: inexpensive way to get into ARM?
If you're interested in getting into ARM assembly language, but not yet
into JTAG or devices, etc, I would recommend looking into
www.gbadev.org and www.devrs.com/gba and trying your hand at Nintendo
Gameboy Advance programming (seriously).

The GBA has an ARM7TDMI core.  There is an emulator called
VisualboyAdvance which runs on both Windows and Linux.  You can buy a
programmable FLASH cart for the GBA for about $100 and GBAs are $80.

It makes it really easy (and fun) to get into ARM programming,
interrupt handling too.  More interesting than flashing LEDs and
writing characters out of a serial port.

Once you're familiar with the instruction set (both ARM and THUMB), you
can graduate onto a more serious platform.

The sites I've listed provide links to GBA information and a
pre-compiled GCC toolchain.


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