Industry Standards?

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I'm about to embark on an embedded system as part of my final year
project at University.  The kit they have in the labs is mainly PICs
with C2C compiler.  Is this kit used in industry to any extent, or is it
the sort of kit used in colleges to teach students but rarely used
elsewhere?  Is there any particular architecture and development
environment that would be better to start with, from a future employment
perspective?

Thanks for any advice.

Cheers,

Simon


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Re: Industry Standards?

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Where the PIC is suitable it is used in industry quite successfully.
However, there are some who seem to think it is the answer to all embedded
system requirements and hence fail miserably. I would get used to looking
at a number of parameters based on the requirements of your project and
choose a processor that is suitable for that. Industry, fortunately, uses a
wide variety of processors.

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Re: Industry Standards?

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a

I agree, the pic thing is quite suitable for entry level and small
projects.. however you would be better off
learning at least 8051, 68HCxx, ARM and MSP430.. you will find these
devices, unlike the pic, have mature
generally bug free professional tools ( compilers/debuggers/profilers
etc.. )
for future employment, I would suggest you take a look at ARM.




Re: Industry Standards?

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There is a huge number of controller families and development tools, and it
is impossible to know them all. For this reason the actual controller and
toolchain chosen doesn't matter because the students will surely have
different ones later on in their job.

The labs should teach students basic principles of operation and
programming. All product knowledge will be obsolete within the next two
years.

Personally, I find the Atmel AVR controllers best for teaching because of
the straightforward architecture and the avalability of free development
tools including gcc compiler. Students will be able to build their own
boards, ISP download cables, jtag debugger and start own projects at home in
their spare time (or as homework), and they will gain much more experience
with this than by attending just a few hours in the lab.

For PICs there is no good free c compiler and no real good free replacement
for the ICD2.

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

Frank-Christian Krügel

Re: Industry Standards?
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This is a really good point. Using gcc makes life simple; having the
manufacturer support easy programming is even better.

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There is sdcc - have you tried it?

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Now that's a recurrent problem.

picp will program most pics, but doesn't provide any way to do the
debugging thing. I'm a little surprised no-one has reverse-engineered
the ICD methodology...

cheers, Rich.

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rich walker         |  Shadow Robot Company | snipped-for-privacy@shadow.org.uk
technical director     251 Liverpool Road   |
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Re: Industry Standards?
PICTerrogator can be used for ICD

look here http://www.wonacott.com /


Re: Industry Standards?

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Well, pretty close :->

Still only supports Windows, requires RS-232 on your PIC board, and
doesn't do PIC18 - otherwise, I'm in :->

cheers, Rich.

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rich walker         |  Shadow Robot Company | snipped-for-privacy@shadow.org.uk
technical director     251 Liverpool Road   |
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