How about Best Text Editor?

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Lately, there has been a thread on the worst text editor (I vote for
Edlin). Wouldn't a discussion of the best text editor be more useful?

I realize that the unix crowd is going to start talking about vi & pico.

I am held hostage by Bill Gates and I like to kill trees (print my source).
 
My favorite is still PFE because it prints nice formatted pages with
headers, indent control etc. I also like the built in command shell that
allows me to call executables and bat files and see the results in the
editor. I use built in editors to write most of my source code (VisualDSP+
& Visual C)

PFE an old program that existed in Win 3.1 days. I would love a
freeware/shareware replacement.


--
Al Clark
Danville Signal Processing, Inc.
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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There's a 32 bit version of PFE around.  It's reported to no longer be
maintained, but it works well and doesn't seem to have too many bugs.
You can find it by searching for "programmers file editor" on the web.

I'm playing with UltraEdit but may still end up buying a copy of
CodeWrite, even if it isn't supported.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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That's actually the version I use. Thanks



--
Al Clark
Danville Signal Processing, Inc.
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In Windows, my vote to Codewright, despite its fate.

Under X, usually Nedit, sometimes XEmacs.

For Unixish text environment, Joe - nearly the old
good WordStar of the CP/M days.

--

Tauno Voipio
tauno voipio (at) iki fi



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PFE32 for me. The only thing I would sometimes like to do that it can't
is to increase the font size temporarily to print something I can't
otherwise see well.

Gary Peek
industrologic.com


Re: How about Best Text Editor?
to me Context is very interesting...

snipped-for-privacy@mycompanyname.com...
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?
A long,long time ago, back in the TRS80 Model III days there was a text
editor in an 80 Micro mag that was really great. It only took up 2K bytes(
2000 bytes), yet had all the 'normal' features.
Load/save/merge,insert/delete,cursor positioning,etc.
I'd like someone to compare that versus the 'bloatware' that we now have to
put up with.
Jay




Re: How about Best Text Editor?
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Actually the "worst editor" thread started from someone's question about
CodeWright (which is apparently not going to be supported).  I'd sure
like to find a free/cheap replacement for CodeWrite, but I may end up
buying CodeWrite for the following features, of which UltraEdit appears
to only have the first two:

1.  Column editing.  Can't be beat.

2.  Regular expressions.  Gotta have 'em.

3.  IDE-like features -- I can compile from it, and after some work with
scripts it'll go to source lines with errors automagicaly.

4.  Point & click for most editing -- I don't want to learn a zillion
stupid key combinations, no matter how cool they are (hence I don't like
either vi or emacs).

5.  Project-based find-in-files.  Find-and-replace-in-files is a plus,
but I'm willing to plow through sed manuals for this if necessary.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?
On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 11:49:29 -0800, Tim Wescott

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So get Slickedit. All the above and much more, available for a number
of platforms, and not about to go out of business.

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Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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I already use Codewright, and will stick with it until Windoze breaks it.  
I have never needed to use their support anyway, so it really makes no
difference to me whether it is still supported or not, it just keeps on
working.

--
Richard

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Good enough reason. My advice was for the OP (other person) who
planned to go buy a copy.

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Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Given my experience with it, I would have no problems recommending someone
purchase it, despite it's discontinuation.  It has worked fine for me on
Win 98, 2000, NT 4.0, and WinXP.

--
Richard

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Not to beat a dead horse, and I'm not a Codewright expert, though I've
used it (have you actually compared it with Slickedit?), but for the
money I'd still recommend Slickedit. It's available for platforms
other than Windows, too. If there's no interest in other platforms,
Multi-Edit is also good, and cheaper.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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We only use Windoze platforms, and, as I said, we already use Codewright,
and are quite happy with it, why learn yet another new one?

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Richard

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Good grief. To repeat the above:
My advice was for Tim Wescott, who planned to go buy a copy, not for
you.

My objection is to your recommendation that he should purchase
Codewright instead of another editor just as good (imo better in a
number of ways) without any knowledge of the other editor. Personally,
I like to try editors, and have a passing familiarity with quite a
few, so my recommendation is based on something other than blind
devotion.

Enough of this thread.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?
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Nope; one more: thanks.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

[snip discussion]
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check


Edit -> Search -> Advanced Search And Replace -> (various regexp things)

check

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scripts it'll go to source
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Tools -> Compile

(followed by)

Compile -> Next Error
Compile -> Previous Error


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key combinations, no
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Check

willing to plow
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Cscope -> (all kinds of find things)


Check.

Looks like you need to take a look at a recent copy of Emacs. It even
has a "File" menu these days.

cheers, Rich.

--
rich walker         |  Shadow Robot Company | snipped-for-privacy@shadow.org.uk
technical director     251 Liverpool Road   |
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With all this talk of column-editing, I'm confused: what's it good for?
I've coded for 20+ years and don't feel that I've missed it.  Re-indenting
code when cut/pasted from a different level of nesting?  There are easy
non-columnar ways to do that in the editors that I use.

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Yep.


I like gvim and emacs' balance here: compiler and search output are
parseable, so you can skip between errors, (you can make and search from
within the editor), but you use your own makefile: there are no magic
files produced by the IDE: there's either source or output.  I hate
mysterious "don't edit me" stuff.

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You can actually drive gvim entirely by point-and-click, but I wouldn't
recommend it for that style of use.  I'd go for the corrollary: I learned
the "one true set" of simple and logical :-) editing key combinations
many, many years ago, and now they're built into my fingers, so I don't
even have to think about them, let-alone take my hands off the keyboard to
find a mouse.  Being the "one true set", I can be confident that an
implementation of vi will be present on or for every computer system that
I need to use, so I don't have to worry about continually learning new
editor commands.

[There is some argument about which is the "one true set", of course.
Some claim that emacs has it.  These days I point out that emacs has a
nice vi emulation mode, but the reverse isn't true, so you can only be
certain of vi availability...]

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Gvim can run and parse grep, so it's just like a command-line, only
neater.  And then there's tags files.  No all-files search *and replace*
that I'm aware of, though.  On that front, I'm intrigued by the
"refactoring" support that Eclipse claims to have, and that the ISE Eiffel
workbench has had for a while: apparently you actually get to muck about
with class inheritance hierarchies and function and variable names at a
level where the editor/thing knows what it's doing.  I've never had a need
to code in Java or Eiffel, though, so can't say how well those work.

Sorry for the ramble: get a craftsman talking about his tools and it's all
over, I'm afraid.  I'm not really trying to talk you into using
gvim.  Really just interested in why you (all) think that columnar
editing is such a key feature.

Cheers,

--
Andrew


Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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CodeWrite does this for you as well.
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After having learned (and forgotten) emacs, enough vi to get back to the
command line, Brief, enough vi to get back to the command line again,
Word/Windoze, and enough vi to get back to the command line _yet again_,
I'll stick with point and click.
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I find that code readability is very much enhanced if long strings of
defines, inline functions, member variables, etc., are arranged in
columns, so all the macros or function names or whatever are in a column
followed by a column of values or function bodies, followed (possibly)
by comments.  Similarly, long blocks of repetitive or obscure
functionality are often best commented by a block of comments off to the
right, all starting on the same column.  Columnar editing allows you to
just grab the relevant columns of stuff and move them as necessary.
It's a particular godsend when you add that one macro/function/variable
name that forces you to move fifty lines of comments over by a couple of
spaces.

--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Re: How about Best Text Editor?

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I've used a number of editors, including CodeWrite.  These days, I find
that I use gvim (Graphical Vi iMproved) which has most of what you've
got on your requirements list if you can get over the mental hurdle of
actually considering a vi derivative.  :-)

I'm not sure what you mean by "point and click for most editing" since
most of my editing involves typing.  I wouldn't really want to have a
pickboard on the screen to choose letters, but I suppose that it could
be a feature to some.  E.g. I built a system like that for a
quadrapalegic fellow I knew some years ago.

I chose vi because it looked slightly easier to use than emacs, and is
available everywhere.  (I work on both Linux and Windows boxes daily.)
I use gvim (or plain vim) under Windows and Linux with no problems.  The
big thing to remember is that you don't really need to learn
*everything* -- just the small subset of things you actually need.

Check out http://www.vim.org/others.php for some screenshots and a
gentle introduction.

Ed


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