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Re: Graphic voting systems
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Sounds like the system used by Kern County, California.
It worked quite well but the State mandated switching to
"better" technology.  Kern County did and now the State
is mandating that the "better" technology not be used in
the coming elections.

Re: Graphic voting systems
On Thu, 6 May 2004 08:37:38 PST, snipped-for-privacy@mojaveg.iwvisp.com (Everett

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I just heard on the radio that the State of Michigan has purchased
optical scan voting machines for those districts that don't already
have them.  I'm not certain exactly what systems those are, but in my
township, we have paper ballots with broken arrows pointing at the
candidates.  To cast your vote, you connect the arrow.  Something like

   >>>--  -->  Tom Smith

   >>>--  -->  Dick Jones

   >>>--  -->  Harry Brown
        ^
        |
        +------ Connect the two halves of the arrow pointing to the
                candidate of your choice.

The ballot is read by an optical scanner that stores the scanned
ballots in a locked box.  Invalid ballots are rejected, and the voter
gets a fresh ballot to try again.  

It works well.  I'm not sure what they do for visually impaired
voters...

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Graphic voting systems

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worked


There has been tons of traffic on this topic in comp.risks over the
past couple of years. I suggest you search for the items in that
newsgroup/mailing list/website (it is all three).

Personnaly, I favour aimple pencil and paper approach to casting my
vote. It should be possible to machine count the votes easily enough
once the voting is completed and return the result in a reasonable
amount of time. Heck, in the UK we still hand count and can usually have
the results available about 4 to 12 hours later (soon enough methinks).

--
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Re: Graphic voting systems
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The point about the time taken to do the count manually
(or semi-automated) is quite on target.  There's no
pressing need for instant results and the cost of labor
is insignificant since many of the people (in the U.S.)
are volunteers.  The election results will not be avail-
able as quickly using manual methods, but the only people
impacted by that are the "instant news" group from the
local TV stations -- you can read about it in tomorrow's
newspaper just as well (or better).

What has puzzled me about the supposedly more secure
machine voting where a paper form is produced for the
voter as a verification of his/her voting is how does
the paper form improve things?  If something is
suspected or does go wrong, does everyone have to
bring in their form for a recount?  How do I verify
that the ones and zeroes in the machine are counted
in the results in the way I intend?

Re: Graphic voting systems
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If anything, instant results and the reporting thereof can harm voting. If
voters in Western states see how an election is shaping up, they may not bother
to go to the polls. Of course, if the election is not going their way, they may
be more motivated to vote. If the results weren't instant, voters might be
motivated to vote as they don't know how the election is turning out and might
not want to take the chance of losing.


Re: Graphic voting systems
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I don't know how it is today, but in Canada in the past the media
(radio and TV) were forbidden from reporting election results
until the polls closed in their own timezone.  This was hardly
leakproof, but still quite effective.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Graphic voting systems
On Thu, 6 May 2004 08:37:07 PST, snipped-for-privacy@mojaveg.iwvisp.com (Everett

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The systems I have heard about display the resulting paper from behind
a clear window.  The voter then gets to press a button saying, "Yup,
that's what I wanted" or "Wrong-o bison breath, let's try that again."
Accepted ballots are then stored in a locked box.  Rejected ballots
are disposed of (a separate locked box, I assume, or perhaps just
marked invalid by the system some way).  

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Graphic voting systems

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I favo(u)r the simple, low-tech approach as well.

The Constitution has no requirement that election results be available
instantly. If it takes a few days, or even a few weeks, for the
results of an election to be verified and certified, well, the country
can wait.

-a

Re: Graphic voting systems
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Andy Peters) writes:

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There unfortunately is a time limit on the election, due to a
constitutional amendment.  That was part of the reason the Supreme
Court got involved in the first place.  A few weeks wouldn't matter
much though.

--
Darin Johnson
    I'm not a well adjusted person, but I play one on the net.

Re: Graphic voting systems
On 6 May, in article

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The winner cannot be inaugurated for another two months, (some of which goes
back to paper counting days and transmission of results), so a day would
make no difference.

--
Paul Carpenter        | snipped-for-privacy@pcserv.demon.co.uk
<http://www.pcserv.demon.co.uk/ Main Site
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Re: Graphic voting systems
: This morning I heard on the radio of the problems with these electronic
: voting systems.
:
: Would you vote on a machine that uses a open source operating system ?

http://www.openvotingconsortium.org /

--
  ******************************************************
  Never ever underestimate the power of human stupidity.
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Re: Graphic voting systems
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The poor quality of that page (it fails to adjust itself to the
width of the display) leads to grave doubts as to the quality of
the proposals.

--
fix (vb.): 1. to paper over, obscure, hide from public view; 2.
to work around, in a way that produces unintended consequences
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Re: Graphic voting systems

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The quality of web pages rarely says anthing about the quality of what
the company actually does.  In this case, it's not a company, but a
consortium of volunteers, who probably think the product is more
important than a web page.

--
Darin Johnson
    Caution! Under no circumstances confuse the mesh with the
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Re: Graphic voting systems

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"Democracy is too important to turn over completely to a machine,"
according to a Californian state senator who ...

Full story: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/05/06/evoting_legislation /

Re: Graphic voting systems

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propably, I take money from one :(

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absolutelly


Pozdrawiam.
--
RusH   //
 http://pulse.pdi.net/~rush/qv30 /
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