Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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Hi,

I work for a company that does automobile airbag software.  Typical
ROM sizes are well under 256K.

We are searching for a good tool for group software development that
will capture a design and manipulate it (change it, print it, etc.).

Can anybody suggest anything they've had really good experience with?
We'd like to investigate all suggestions.

Thanks a lot,
Dave Ashley.

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
On 11 Nov 2003 07:18:25 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (David T. Ashley)

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We've had pretty good experience with IAR VisualState.  Generates
reasonable code from (essentially) UML statecharts.  Not a full UML,
however, if you're just looking to capture design information.

For example, one project had about 12 state machines, more than 60
total states, required a little over 5k ROM space.  Of that, about
2.5k was our support code (device interface, initialization, etc.).
So the state machines themselves and the code to drive them took less
than 3k.  It seems to scale well -- Quadrupling the number of states
(15 -> 60) resulted in a less than 50% increase (>2k -> <3k) in ROM
usage.  We haven't done anything much bigger with it yet...

Problems: it doesn't work with all 8-bit compilers (but that's the
compiler's fault, not VisualState's -- it seems to generate good
ANSI/ISO code).  And it tends to shift implementation details into the
design.  But that's the case with any tool that claims to generate
code from design.

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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LOL

Ian

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 16:41:53 +0000, Ian Bell

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Umm, why?

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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256K of code to decide when to pop an air bag???

Ian


Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 20:51:03 +0000, the renowned Ian Bell

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It sounds insane, but maybe there's some sophisticated processing
going on to detect crash signatures from raw accelerometer and other
data. Still..


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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Cripes, that's scared me sh*tless! There's me driving along with an
explosive device a foot from my nose with a complex crash detection system
implemented in software controlling it. Worse than that, the software is
written by someone else! Life behind the wheel will never be the same
again... :-)

Mark.



Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
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At least that'll only inflate an airbag - if you wish to be paranoid,
worry about what's controlling ABS and traction control!

--
Paul Black                        mailto: snipped-for-privacy@oxsemi.com
Oxford Semiconductor Ltd          http://www.oxsemi.com
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Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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Nah, that's about three lines of code.

if(wheel == STOPPED) ReleaseBrakeForABit();

Ian

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
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...and only now are they looking for a tool to design the stuff with.

Ian

Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
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Deja vu all over again!  The following is from a thread 7+ years ago
on this newsgroup referring to engine management systems.  The thread
was "Can OO be successful in real-time embedded systems?"  I was the
poster of what I thought was some useful info about program sizes.

I still love the "I am apalled" comment!!!

And yes, I did respond, and he didn't comment any further.   8-)

Enjoy,


    -=Dave=-


P.S.:  Current systems are running twice the size of these examples.
Uh-oh--I'm in for it now.   ;-)



 >> No, it isn't.  Two (typical-I think) samples break down as
 >>
 >>                                  A          B
 >>
 >>          Executable code        79%        75%
 >>          Tables (your maps?)    14%        18%
 >>          Program constants       5%         5%
 >>          Data and stack          3%         2%
 >>
 >> Example A is production-ready and totals 366,000 bytes, while example
 >> B totalled 412,000 bytes at two weeks into development (when these
 >> stats were taken).

 > Speaking as a theoretical physicist with a lifelong interest in
 > engines, I am appalled. I think there can be no excuse for 300 Kb of
 > executable to control an engine.  There just aren't that many vari-
 > ables being controlled. Off the top of my head I count
 >
 >         Fuel intake
 >         Air intake
 >         Coolant flow
 >         ignition energy
 >
 > as control variables, and
 >
 >         RPM
 >         Output torque (load)
 >         Exhaust chemistry
 >         Exhaust temp
 >         Exhaust pressure
 >         Combustion chamber temp
 >         Combustion chamber pressure
 >
 > as measured variables. Unless one has separate sensors for each
 > cylinder, one has 7 measured variables to control 4 input variables.
 > How complex can such an algorithm be, for heaven's sake?
 > Let us be generous and imagine it is a fancy 12-cylinder Jaguar
 > engine with    <text elided>
 > If I am missing something essential and obvious, pray instruct me.
 > But from where I sit it looks as though the executable code could
 > greatly benefit from a little factoring. Maybe the system could
 > then get by with an 8-bit chip and 64K of memory.






Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design

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Wonderful.  Just shows how little has been learnt in the last 7 years.

Ian


Re: Good UML Tools For Embedded System Design
You can try EventStudio, a CASE tool design specifically for embedded
system design.

http://www.eventhelix.com/EventStudio /

Sandeep

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