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Re: EU lead-free directive

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http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00190023.pdf
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Probably because they're bureaucrats, i.e., have no concept of the way
real reality works. ;-)
--
Cheers!
Rich
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Re: EU lead-free directive
["Followup-To:" header set to sci.electronics.design.]
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http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00190023.pdf
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It isn't because "they" are bureaucrats (they are, of course).
Just think about how politics work (or watch a few episodes of
"West Wing"). Funny stuff like this everywhere, but in the long
run it'll hopefully change things for the better.

robert


Re: EU lead-free directive

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http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00190023.pdf

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Well, I make that one more reason to vote "NO" on the European constitution
today...
Thanks for pointing that out.

Rob



Re: EU lead-free directive
John Popelish schrieb:

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All exceptions are potentially limited in time. They are for products or
materials for which /currently/ no realistic substitutes are available. Another
example: Cadmium in NiCd cells of electric hand tools. As soon as
technologically possible, these exceptions will probably be dropped from the
list.

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive
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list.
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That certainly seems to apply to the more inexplicable exceptions (lead
is allowed in servers, storage devices, and network infrastructure devices).

It also seems, as far as I can see, that exceptions are granted where
there is scientific or technical reasons not to use the substitute, or
where the substitute is more harmful to the environment and/or people.

There is also a mention of spare parts and repairs - does this mean
suppliers can continue to produce and supply lead-containing electronics
as spare parts?

Re: EU lead-free directive
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The alternative would be the very counterproductive/ludicrous:

"Oh, we have to dump that product now; Can't repair it as we cannot get
parts anymore. Send it to the land-fill!"

..and a heap of lead that would not have otherwise been in the
land-fill, gets there much earlier, because of the lead-free directive....

-jg


Re: EU lead-free directive
["Followup-To:" header set to sci.electronics.design.]

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This is plenty explicable. The manufacturers of this equipment
claim (with some validity) that there isn't much known about the
long-term stability of the lead-free stuff, and since companies
and governments and whatnot rely on reliable IT infrastructure
they can't run the risk of switching over to a new technology.

robert


Re: EU lead-free directive


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Hmmm. Interesting! Is there a reference to this somewhere? Currently,
every customer is sending us a list of questions about this. Would
"industrial" be anything "professional" e.g. professional broadcast
equipment?

What is WEEE?


Re: EU lead-free directive
snipped-for-privacy@nospam24.com (Peter) writes:

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Hi Peter,

Checkout the "Re: A european question : RoHS" thread (in S.E.D). Links
to the directives are:

<http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00190023.pdf

and

<http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00240038.pdf

See Article 2 section 1 of RoHS, which refers to Annex IA of the WEEE
document.


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I am *so* not an expert on this.... But as I understand it, WEEE is
about making sure manufacturers bear the cost of recycling products
made with "hazardous" substances. For example, by providing recyling
schemes, collecting the unwanted items etc.

RoHS on the other hand *prohibits* such manufacture in the first
place, with some exceptions. It appears that industrial equipment is
one such!

--

John Devereux

Re: EU lead-free directive
Peter schrieb:

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"Waste of Eletrical and Electronic Equipment" - another new EU directive.

Basically, it is about that manufacturers of EE products must guarantie to take
them back without cost. They also must be marked as devices that shall not be
dropped into "normal" waste.
This one applies to the companies that first sell anything to the (normally
private) end customer, B2B is less concerned (if at all).

There surely are online documents about it, but I don't have links at hand...

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive


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Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive.

Graham



Re: EU lead-free directive

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single
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conform
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http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en00190023.pdf
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I suspect, since I was looking at some RoHS stuff today, that's intended to allow
high lead solders for die attach in semiconductors.

I rather though that was *low* melting point though !

Check this out.

http://uk.farnell.com/images/en/ede/pdf/PKG153.pdf


Graham



Re: EU lead-free directive
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It's laws and directives on one side, and people and companies not
(fully) complying with them on the other side. It has always been
that way. So you can take a risk, pay a fine if you get caught, and
probably a very damn small one, if you explain your situation. Soup
is not consumed as hot as it is prepared.

--
Thanks, Frank.
(remove 'q' and 'invalid' when replying by email)




Re: EU lead-free directive
Note that this requirement will probably trickle down to the engineer.
Management will ask the eng. to state that the product complies.
Guess who gets the blame.

gm


Re: EU lead-free directive


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As long as you have a RoHS statement from the manufacturer, there is no
way you as an engineer can be held culpable if the mfr doesn't fully
comply.


Re: EU lead-free directive
Oh so management will take the blame.... I don't think so.

Anyway it's certainly a big change in components and change in process
that will take a relative long time to iorn out.

gm


Re: EU lead-free directive


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Actually no. Engineering's job is to specify the right part.
Purchasing's job is to buy the right part. The vendor's job is to
supply the right part.

If Engineering has a RoHS compliance cert for part ABC Engineering is
OK.

If Purchasing requires the vendor to provide a RoHS compliance cert for
inbound shipments of part ABC, Purchasing is OK.

If the vendor ships part ABC, and part ABC is compliant, the vendor is
OK.

As long as you spec in a part and require it to be RoHS-compliant, any
problems that happen with the RoHS side of things are a fight between
Purchasing and the vendor.


Re: EU lead-free directive
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Speaking of who gets blamed, I once insisted on working a contract type
job as an employee.  It was medical equipment.  Anybody sues us, they
can't sue an employee, as they could a subcontractor.

--
Luhan Monat: luhanis(at)yahoo(dot)com
http://members.cox.net/berniekm
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Re: EU lead-free directive

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You are wrong here.  If you are the person in the company who is
the professional expert on the subject and your advice is wrong, it
is you who can be personally sued.  If your advice is correct and
the management over-rule it, then the management can be sued.

Of course what actually happens depends upon the type of loss.
If the loss is a simple monetary one, then the company can be held
to be vicariously liable and are likely to be sued as well, because
they are the ones with the (insurance) money.  But if the loss is of a
life, then it is the individual engineer who is the one in the dock on the
manslaughter charge.

If you want, I am sure that I can find you some examples.

tim




Re: EU lead-free directive
On Tue, 31 May 2005 23:36:21 +0200, "tim \(moved to sweden\)"

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Only if you are an officer of the company and are a "PE" or similar
with sign-off responsibility.

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On this side of the pond, they must first prove criminal negligence,
otherwise it's simply a financial responsibility of the company.

                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
|  James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
|  Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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