designing a battery operated device without a regulator

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What are some issues associated with using vs. not using a regulator
when designing a consumer electronic device that runs off 2x1.5v
alkalines?

Obviously cost is the issue here. Do most ultra-cheap electronic
devices intended to run off replaceable batteries have regulators?
What drives the decision?

Thanks.

Re: designing a battery operated device without a regulator
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The neccesity, I guess. If it isn't needed... A small PIC may
run happily on 3.3V (fresh alkalines) down to 2V. But if the
device is powered by a 9V (for some other circuitry) some form
of regulation is needed. If the current is stable and predictable
it may be a simple resistor!


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Thanks, Frank.
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Re: designing a battery operated device without a regulator

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Or diode.

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- Mark ->
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Re: designing a battery operated device without a regulator

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There are lot's of issues but they are very application dependent.  The
obvious ones are battery voltage versus time, battery volts versus current,
peak to average current ratio and how all of these affect the electronic
devices connected to the batteries.  The last battery powered development I
was involved in was a CO2 monitor which needed to meet both UL and BS
specifications for five years when operated from a PP3.  To meet these
specs you have to sample at least once per minute and be able to operate an
80dB SPL sounder for 30 minutes at then end of five years.  Perhaps the
biggest issue is the inability/unwillingness of the battery manufacturers
to commit to any battery performance over these timescales.

Ian


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