Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers. - Page 2

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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Fri, 10 Dec
2004:
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The Royal National Institute for the Blind in UK has done an enormous
amount of work on computer aids for blind people. Quite a few years ago,
they has voice-operated writers (needed a lot of training, so not viable
commercially) and readers. The readers would run at speeds far higher
than normal speech and people were trained to understand at those
speeds.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:31:18 +0000, the renowned John Woodgate

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The human brain can interpret speech at a much higher speed than
people can speak clearly. There are devices that speed up voice
(essentially by stealing chunks of it, so that it doesn't increase in
pitch) and they are still understandable at much higher than normal
speeds. I wonder if there's a better algorithm that might be practical
today.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
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<snip>
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essencially
by

Roland,

Would you please describe the spacing of the pins as best you can --
or (the overall dimensions of the rectangle?  I
have an idea that might reproduce this device's behavior, and be
somewhat scaled up.

Similarly, do you know anything about the
frequency of vibration used?  (If memory serves, one peak in human
sensitivity to vibration is around 300 Hz., and I *think* there's
another one (different sensory neurons?) much lower (50 Hz?.)
Unfortunately the neurologist who I recall mentioning the frequency
response is no longer here to ask.

Do you think a quasi-static displacements would work well enough to
use?  Fast enough to show sequences of tactile "images" (like a
morph-able wood carving), but not fast enough to feel like a vibration?
In that case, an array of pins displaced by resistance-heated Nitinol
wires might work for a dense, potentially inexpensive device.
Larry Pfeffer


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
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<snip>
Quoted text here. Click to load it
essencially
by

Roland,

Would you please describe the spacing of the pins as best you can --
or (the overall dimensions of the rectangle?  I
have an idea that might reproduce this device's behavior, and be
somewhat scaled up.

Similarly, do you know anything about the
frequency of vibration used?  (If memory serves, one peak in human
sensitivity to vibration is around 300 Hz., and I *think* there's
another one (different sensory neurons?) much lower (50 Hz?.)
Unfortunately the neurologist who I recall mentioning the frequency
response is no longer here to ask.

Do you think a quasi-static displacements would work well enough to
use?  Fast enough to show sequences of tactile "images" (like a
morph-able wood carving), but not fast enough to feel like a vibration?
In that case, an array of pins displaced by resistance-heated Nitinol
wires might work for a dense, potentially inexpensive device.
Larry Pfeffer


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
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<Snip>

I wonder if single line of (say) 16 small needles with 16 photodiodes
(or whatever) controlling them would work?  Rather than move your finger
across a fixed array of pins, you have the line of pin/sensors fixed to
your finger and move the line across the object.

Some years ago I tried the electrical stimulation technique but found it
impossible to set a useable frequency/voltage/current.  Only small
changes in pressure or moistness varied the stimulus between
undetectable and painful.

Cheers
--
Keith Wootten


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
Regarding safety:

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it


Neural stimulation can be done safely, though special care is certainly
indicated -- as is keeping well away from the heart, unless you're an
EMT or a cardiologist!

In the U.S. there are devices approved by the FDA, for use (including
home use) for treating chronic pain.  Googling
TENS neural stimulation will produce many hits on such.  An earlier
poster alluded to 5 mA, and this is in the range mentioned in several
biomedical Eng. texts.  That's a rough ballpark, though it doesn't take
into account electrode area, and thus current density.  It does,
however, point toward a key aspect of doing this reasonably safety --
controlling the current, very important, given the wide variations in
resistance.

Interested readers may wish to read a related thread on
sci.electronics.design,
thread title "Bipolar current source for muscle stimulations"
(started 23Oct2004.)  This thread includes a schematic for delivering a
controlled (bipolar) current, submitted by the estimable Winfield Hill.
-- Larry Pfeffer
(larry underscore pfeffer at verizon dot com)


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
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Bit melodramatic, what?

Big Rule of the Universe #4.3.a:

  There is no such thing as no such thing.

--
Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
Consulting Engineer:  Electronics; Informatics; Photonics.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
'Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Tue, 14
Dec 2004:

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Quite right. Now I have a special bargain for you. A hundred $6 bills
for $500.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
snipped-for-privacy@jmwa.demon.contraspam.yuk says...
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Good deal!  Your $500 bill is in the mail.

--
  Keith

Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
'Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Tue, 14
Dec 2004:

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Sorry, I can only accept four $125 bills, or three £133.33 bills.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
  >
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Discount eh?


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.

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You have to realize that John Woodgate is so old that when he learned the
multiplication table it was still very new, and still contained some
faulty results. The multiplication tables have been debugged since then.


--
Roger J.

Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Wed, 15 Dec 2004:
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I really didn't want to explain, but I suppose I must. The $133.33 bills
are much rarer, and sell to collectors at over $2500 each.

I'd even accept a genuine 1952 English penny.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.

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From the side thread, it sort of sounds like that should be, "_the_
genuine 1952 English penny." ;-)

Cheers!
Rich


Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
I read in sci.electronics.design that Rich The Philosophizer
g>) about 'Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.',
on Wed, 15 Dec 2004:
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I was careful to say that only one example is KNOWN. I believe there are
alleged to be up to five more out there somewhere. They were not issued
in Britain, but in the then British islands in the Caribbean.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
  > You have to realize that John Woodgate is so old that when he
learned the
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John, like myself, was taught the tables in an age when you had to be
prepared to change base several times within a single problem. 12d = 1s,
20s = £1, 21s = 1 guinea. A £133/6/8d note would not have been
surprising back then.

Paul Burke

Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.

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His lame defence surprised me, I thought he would say something like this:

"Well, I was the chairman of the committee which set up the multiplication
tables, and the other guys on that committee messed it up."

Then he would try to blame his old friends, Euclid, Pythagoras, Archimedes,
and those arabs with names you cannot pronounce, like Al-Khowarismi
(AKA mr. Algoritm) who wrote the book Kitab al-jabr wa al-muqabalah,
(al-jabr was later pronounced as "algebra").



--
Roger J.

Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Wed, 15 Dec 2004:

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I never blame other people, even though it's always their fault. And I
meant it about the penny, but not the £15 copies you can buy on the web.
A real one would produce a tingling sensation in anybody's fingers. (;-)
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
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Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 16:07:20 +0000, John Woodgate

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---
Much like one of our 1913 Liberty Head nickles?

--
John Fields

Re: Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.
I read in sci.electronics.design that John Fields <jfields@austininstrum
'Circuit that produces a tingling sensation in the fingers.', on Wed, 15
Dec 2004:
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Not in the same ball-park.(;-) There are five known nickels, but there
is only ONE known 1952 English penny.
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.
The good news is that nothing is compulsory.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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