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Re: Accurate pedometer

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<reasons why it won't work snipped>

I won't bother to discuss your points, because the fact is that GPSs
can and do work indoors. Theory isn't needed when actual experience is
available.

Perhaps you're thinking "line of sight" equates to "visible light"?
GPS signals don't need a window to come through.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: Accurate pedometer
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You should broaden your world a bit. I live in a country were 99% of the
building floors are reinforced concrete. So my 'actual experience' is that a
GPS never works in a building. It is all a matter of perspective....

Meindert



Re: Accurate pedometer
Even a cheap GPS will do a good job. Cheap ones are plentiful.
Or test drive a Cadillac and get one free.

Doug

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Re: Accurate pedometer
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Are you kidding?

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Accurate pedometer
Kidding about what?

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Re: Accurate pedometer

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Kidding about getting a free GPS when you test drive a car. Just how cheap
are these things? I did a little poking around and most of them seem to be
$200 and up. -- Mike



Re: Accurate pedometer
Local Cadillac dealer was giving away a Garmin GPS 38 for
doing a test drive. Appeared to be a corporate offer as the GPS
was delivered in the mail a few weeks later. I didn't need either
a new car or another GPS, but a good friend of mine went and
did the test drive just to get the GPS. You can get a GPS good
enough for pedometer purposes for under $100.

Doug

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Re: Accurate pedometer
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         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
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As underlined.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Accurate pedometer
You lost me again Chuck.

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Re: Accurate pedometer


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ADI has an app note describing an accurate pedometer using one of their
MEMS accelerometers.

Leon


Re: Accurate pedometer


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ADI has an app note describing an accurate pedometer using one of their
MEMS accelerometers.

Leon


Re: Accurate pedometer
I'd use a GPS reciever, since you have a start point you can subtract it
from your arbitratry finish point and derive a distance measurement.
Nowadays, +/- three feet accurcy seems typical.
If you want fancy you could use a accelerometer chip and get the pacing
movement measurements as well.


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Re: Accurate pedometer
C'mon now.  Use a full-blown inertial navigation system.  Maybe add a
palm-pilot with GPS to help calculate and compensate drift.  You could wear
it all in a backpack with a 28 vdc power pack.  Just think of all the
exercise...

Scott



Re: Accurate pedometer
I got to thinking about your bluetooth shoes and that isn't a all bad
thought actually.
Having shoes take various measurements to transmit that info back to a data
gathering computer
can be invaluable to various people. Runners, joggers, weight lifters,
physical therapy, hiking, etc.
could benifit from such info. For example a runner could use it to help
determine better pacing, whether one leg is being favored over the other,
and so on.
It would be interesting to see the data gathered for a pole vaulter or long
jumper or shot putter person.


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Re: Accurate pedometer
I wanted to come up with something simple, unique and reliable. I thought,
"Here's a problem I'm having. How can I solve it?" The suggestion for a
piezo in the shoe was right along those lines.

The answer is, of course, that the problem has not just been solved by
somebody else, but beat to death! GPS Systems. Accelerometers .You name it.

I like your thoughts on the Bluetooth shoes, but I'm pretty sure this kind
of thing has been done. Especially at the professional level. It may be
possible to bring this kind of technology to every day people. I could see
people paying three or four hundred dollars per pair of shoes that come
along with the Bluetooth receiving device (if necessary), a CD and a USB
cable.

Mike


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Re: Accurate pedometer

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I believe that the definition of "pedometer" is to count Steps, but
of course users are more interested in distance, which will require
a GPS or some form of calibration.  Calibration is the problem,
especially if it goes off while you are sitting down! I would think
that a nice little accelerometer in the shoe could even make a good
guess as to whether you are walking or running and how long the foot
is InTheAir might extrapolate to the length of pace??? - RM


Re: Accurate pedometer

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To make a real pedometer, you definitely want something that measures
mechanical quantities (pressure on the heel, or acceleration of the
foot).  Use it wisely, and you won't even have to provide stored power
for the device --- a boot-heel pressure sensor can easily generate
enough power on its own that you won't need a battery.  This technique
has already been suggested as a main power source for all kinds of
portable gear.

Putting it somewhere between the heel of one foot and the ground, you
can set a very reliable threshold, too, to distinguish an actual step
from the foot just moving around and hitting some things --- every
pressure pulse equivalent to most of your full body weight landing on
the heel almost instantaneously obviously should be counted as a valid
"step", and be sufficiently unlikely to occur otherwise.

An acceleration measurement of the foot via, say, an ancle strap,
might work, too, but would be a whole lot easier to fool.

Having a sensor only in one shoe, multiply everything by two...

--
Hans-Bernhard Broeker ( snipped-for-privacy@physik.rwth-aachen.de)
Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.

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