8051 books

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Subject says it all really.  Looking for intermediate book(s) on using
and programming the 8051.  Any recommendations?

Ian


Re: 8051 books
Ian Bell schrieb:
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Look at the homepages of Philips Semiconductors and of Atmel.
Both have plenty of documentation, tutorials and application notes.
Also have a look at http://www.8052.com - *the* 8051/52 resource.

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
Autometer GmbH Siegen - Elektronik nach Maß.
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Re: 8051 books
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Been there done that but I really want something in a book form that I
can sit and read or place on the bench where I am working (PC is a bit
heavy for that).

Ian


Re: 8051 books


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Myke Predko has a book or two on this subject.  I have one and it's ok,
but perhaps a bit basic.  Jan Axelson also has some good books on the
subject.  I suggest http://www.8052.com as a place to start.  There is
allot of good information available there along with information about
many of the books available..

michael


Re: 8051 books
A couple of books that I use are-

Programming and Interfacing the 8051 Microcontroller
by Sencer Yeralan and Ashutosh Ahluwalia
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

and

Short Course 8051/8032 Microcontrollers and Assembler
by M Ohsmann
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

unfortunately these both might be hard to find now, but both are good - the
top one is better with
plenty of experiments to reinforce the learning.

Colin


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Re: 8051 books
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I have Mykes 'Programming and customising the 8051 microcontroller' and,
with all due respect to Myke, I really do not like this book.  I think
it is more his style than anything plus it is rather basic in some
areas.  I suspect I need a book that assumes I am familiar with micros
in general but not the 8051 in particular.

   Jan Axelson also has some good books on the
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I have had a good look here too.  There are plenty of books but few
reviews and I am anxious not to repeat the mistake with Myke's book
which is why I was rather hoping for some specific recommendations.

Ian


Re: 8051 books

"Ian Bell"

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They all stink, IMO.  These kinds of books are also typically too general to
actually do anything unless you happen to have purchased their exact
hardware, software, like the sometimes convoluted way they do things, etc.
There are a lot of C5x flavors out there.

If you are already familiar with other chips, seems you should just download
the instruction set and user manual for your hardware.

http://www.dunfield.com/ has a pretty lightweight, cheap and easy to
understand development environment.  He uses a subset of C, sells a nice
debugger, loader, etc.  Tutorials and examples included.


- Nate



Re: 8051 books

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general to
etc.

That about sums up my opinions too, I was just trying to be nice.  ;-)
I do find my John Peatman (sp?) PIC book to be quite excellent.  Even
though it doesn't cover any of the chips I've used, it still covered all
the important topics (timers, interrupts, UARTs, SPI, Hitachi LCD
control, switch debouncing, keyboard matrixes etc..)

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download

IMO, Datasheets and Application Notes are the best source of information
for all but the newest of beginners.  I would still recommend a newbie
read them and try to learn to use them as their primary source of
information when writing/debugging their assembly code.

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nice

C is cool, I really like the Keil compiler.  After struggling with SDCC
for a while, the Keil compiler seemed like a work of art.  I don't mean
to knock SDCC, it's just not real forgiving of those that don't exude
perfect ANSI C syntax.  It did sharpen up my assembly skills quite a bit
debugging my code.  The Keil compiler is a bit more user friendly, but
AFAIK it doesn't run on Linux.  :-((  It also generates more compact
code, but it does cost a small fortune.

I would recommend that when starting with any unfamiliar micro, the user
write only assembly code for a while.  I've done a few projects in C,
but since I mostly tinker with PIC chips I primarily write assembly.

michael (IANAEE, just somebody having a ball figuring things out)


Re: 8051 books
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embedded book review section in

www.accu.org


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\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England    /\/\/\/\/\
/\/\/ snipped-for-privacy@phaedsys.org       www.phaedsys.org \/\/
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Re: 8051 books
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Thanks for that Chris.  Had a good look there under embeeded and
assemblers and at least I now know which books NOT to buy.  Tell, what
8051 books do you have on your bookshelf and what do you think of them?

Ian


Re: 8051 books
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I have most of the books on the accu embedded review list :-)

The "Final Word on the 8051" is a good book. Its free and electronic.
See 8052.com for a link... (I must find the link again)  There is the
C51 Primer that is also free on download from http://Quest.phaedsys.org
it's not finished... I intend to get the current update (V3.7) completed
for Christmas.

The Schultz books on 8051 are OK.... they grew on me but are IMHO in
need of a re-write because EVERY page has *at least* one foot note!

The problem is the books tend to be very general or very tightly tied to
a particular dev kit. Which is fine if the kit is inexpensive and
available in your part of the world (if available at all) otherwise no
fun at all.

The other problem is what do you mean by "intermediate"?  There are some
"experts" I wouldn't let code anything and some "novices" who may be
short on topic knowledge but they are solid Engineers.....

What are you trying to achieve?  

And before "they" jump in... No! Forth is not the answer:-)


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\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England    /\/\/\/\/\
/\/\/ snipped-for-privacy@phaedsys.org       www.phaedsys.org \/\/
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Re: 8051 books
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I found a copy here:  http://www.fe.up.pt/~ee99043/8051/index.htm

Ian


Re: 8051 books
You try here for a start...
http://www.intel.com/design/MCS51/MANUALS/27238302.pdf

Gary

Ian Bell wrote:

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Re: 8051 books
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Sorry Gary, maybe I should have given a bit more info.  I have
downloaded lots of stuff from the web, including the MCS-51 manual you
linked to above.  What I really need is a book that I can carry around
and refer to when working on the bench and so on - the PC is a bit heavy
for this.  Ideally the MCS-51 manual itself.

Ian

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Re: 8051 books

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Ian, find a copy of the Intel "Embedded Applications" Handbook (Yep,
it's a real paper book). It covers all the basic stuff like reading
buttons, writing to a display etc. My copy is 1991, but there is
probably a later edition.
M

Re: 8051 books
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80C51 Based 8-bit Microcontrollers Data Handbook IC20 (1997)
Philips Semiconductors
Document orderno 9397 750 00963
US tel: +1 800 234 7381
NL Tel: +31 40 27 82785

Or else
http://www.eg3.com/WebID/embedded/8051/blank/book/1-a-m.htm

I'm sure you can google up some more yourself.



Re: 8051 books
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Sounds like just the thing.  Is this one you use yourself?

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Googled quite a few already.  problem is knowing which are the good
ones, which is why I was hoping for recommendations.

Ian


Re: 8051 books



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If you can get a copy od IC20, great. (I may have a few extras...)

I have the chapters 5-7 ripped out of the Intel book (I had 2), and bound
for my desktop hardcopy, it's only 122 pages, or 61 pages at 2/printer
page :>)

Gary



Re: 8051 books
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You need the 1997 version which is a fair bit larger than the later
versions.
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\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England    /\/\/\/\/\
/\/\/ snipped-for-privacy@phaedsys.org       www.phaedsys.org \/\/
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Re: 8051 books
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Did you get my email Chris?

Ian


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