Solid tinned wire meets circuit board

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Try not to laugh too hard.

I think I may need a video on how to connect components on a board.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/8iuqo9iu0em42d5/first2.png?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/kuqpwpxxl24b6zc/first1.png?dl=0


Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
Bad deduction : the reistor is used to lift the board like a handle !!


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Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
On Monday, May 20, 2019 at 10:10:34 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
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So when soldering two things together (say a lead and plated hole  
on pcb) you want to try and make a four way junction.  The two  
metal bits, the tip of the soldering iron, and the end of the  
piece of solder.  Tin the solder tip first, (Tin-- touch with solder  
such that a little melts.)  

George H.  
(maybe a video would be good.)  

Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
On 5/20/19 10:10 PM, AK wrote:
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You're not using enough heat, for one thing.  The plated holes should be  
completely filled with solder.  Using a sufficiently-hot iron (700F is  
good), hold the iron on the joint for four or five seconds after you see  
the solder flow.

And as for that mess on the right side of the first picture, you've got  
oxidized solder problems, for which you need more active flux (RA vs  
RMA) and reasonably new solder.  As I'll say one last time, you want to  
use new Kester 44 solder, which you can get for $3 via that eBay link I  
posted upthread.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
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Is there a ground pin on that plug?

--  
  When I tried casting out nines I made a hash of it.

Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
On Wednesday, May 22, 2019 at 1:31:39 AM UTC-5, Jasen Betts wrote:
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No.

Andy

Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
Could be funny, but when I've been starting some 50 years ago, it was  
not better.
A new soldering iron is like a domestic animal, you must master it.

An advice : don't give up.
Failing is the best teacher.


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Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
snipped-for-privacy@electrooptical.net says...
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That is what I have found out.  Use a hot iron with as large of a tip  
that you can.  The mass of the larger tip helps keep the temperature up.  

Get in with a very hot iron and back out again.

With the older irons without any control the heat was controlled by how  
much heat would escape to the air and smaller wattages were used.  With  
the temperature controlled irons a 50 to about a 100 watt iron is  
common.

Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
On 5/22/19 6:22 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
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Yup.  As a thought experiment, imagine a soldering iron one degree above  
the solder's melting point (technically its liquidus point, for  
non-eutectic alloys).  Those parts would get very hot for a very long  
time before the solder flowed.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Solid tinned wire meets circuit board
On Wed, 22 May 2019 16:25:40 -0400, Phil Hobbs

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https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL926EC0F1F93C1837

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Greetings Phil,
  You are absolutely correct about the higher temp being better.
People tend to be cautious when soldering and use too little heat.
Soldering needs to be done hot and fast.
Eric

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