Windows 10 setup and security advice

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I finally talked a sister into giving up her old Dell PC with Vista, so  
naturally as punishment next week I have to go down and unpack her new Dell  
PC with Win 10 Home and transfer all of her files over.  I'm still on Win 7  
Ultimate myself so I've never used Win 10 and I need some advice.  First, my  
understanding is that you can turn off the tablet look and get a traditional  
desktop instead.  Is that easy to find, or is there some secret incantation  
I need to know to find a hidden button or menu or control panel?  She has  
DSL with the usual modem/router/wifi box with all of the factory (or  
Southern Bell) defaults and the PC will be plugged directly in so do I need  
to have the internal wifi in the new PC turned on?  My assumption is that  
there is no need for a wifi connection directly to the PC.  Same question  
about bluetooth on the PC.  She has a tablet and IPhone but they use wifi to  
get to the internet so that just goes to the dsl, no need to involve the PC,  
right?  Any other reasons I need them on in the PC?  Are there any security  
or other settings in Win 10 that I need to check or change?  I assume that  
it will come with one admin user set up with full privileges and that I  
should create a normal, non-admin, user for her to use.  How about antivirus  
software?  I've been using Kaspersky on my machine, with free cccleaner and  
malwarebytes for occasional checks and cleanup, plus windows defender.  With  
all of the "Russian hacking" news and accusations about Kaspersky I don't  
know if I will renew next year or switch for myself, and I don't know what  
to recommend for her.

So, if anyone (yes, I'm thinking of you, Jeff L :-) :-), please) has any  
advice I'd love to hear it.  Thanks in advance.

--
Regards,
Carl Ijames  


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
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Download a free win10 virtual machine image from Microsoft and try it
yourself.

https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/downloads/virtual-machines

There's plenty of how-to's on you-tube.

tablet phone:
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file sharing?

--  
     ?

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
1. My advice would have been Win 7 Pro
2. Tell her to save everything every 2 minutes because at any time it will download an update and make it unusable for up to overnight and might fuck it up.  

If you're going to throw that Vista PC out I'll take it and upgrade to XP Pro Corp. (that version has quite a bit that most people don't know about)

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 13/09/2018 4:49 am, Carl wrote:
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That went out with Windows 8.1, Win10 boots to a desktop with start button.

The start menu is organised differently though. FWIW I use:

<https://www.stardock.com/products/start10/

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Your basic assumptions are good. The system should boot up with DHCP  
enabled. As another reply mentioned maybe wireless for file-sharing,  
although if the phone & tablet are apple devices there's usually no  
files to share or they're on the cloud and accessible via a web account  
interface.

Otherwise leave all the wireless off.

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This you'll need to research for yourself if you want more detail - even  
the Administrator account can be restricted when it comes to altering  
parts of the OS etc. The default account should be the only one required  
and there's always UAC (User Account Control) which interrupts every  
time something wants to make a change (mine's turned off).

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Windows Defender is deprecated for Win10 and is replaced by 'Security  
Center'. Additional AV doesn't hurt. Make sure the OS updated with the  
latest security patches (if nothing else). I also use MwB, CCleaner, and  
corporate rules force Sophos onto us...

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--
Cheers,

Chris.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice

On 13/09/2018 4:49 am, Carl wrote:
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That went out with Windows 8.1, Win10 boots to a desktop with start button.

The start menu is organised differently though. FWIW I use:

<https://www.stardock.com/products/start10/

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Your basic assumptions are good. The system should boot up with DHCP
enabled. As another reply mentioned maybe wireless for file-sharing,
although if the phone & tablet are apple devices there's usually no
files to share or they're on the cloud and accessible via a web account
interface.

Otherwise leave all the wireless off.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

This you'll need to research for yourself if you want more detail - even
the Administrator account can be restricted when it comes to altering
parts of the OS etc. The default account should be the only one required
and there's always UAC (User Account Control) which interrupts every
time something wants to make a change (mine's turned off).

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Windows Defender is deprecated for Win10 and is replaced by 'Security
Center'. Additional AV doesn't hurt. Make sure the OS updated with the
latest security patches (if nothing else). I also use MwB, CCleaner, and
corporate rules force Sophos onto us...

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Cheers,

Chris.
===============================================================

Thanks, Chris, glad to hear about the start button and no need for a second  
user.  No one does any wireless file sharing with her current machine, she  
just plugs her phone in every couple of years when it fill up with pictures  
to download them for more space.  She mostly does email (still uses the AOL  
interface, sigh :-)) and web surfing, plus a little Word and Excel, and the  
grandkids play web based games when they visit.  I'm going to show her  
LibreOffice so she won't have to pay to upgrade her ancient Microsoft Office  
bundle.  It sounds like it will be even easier than I hoped.

Last question, does Win 10 still insist on doing updates when it wants to or  
is there a way to control the scheduling?

--
Regards,
Carl Ijames  


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 13/09/2018 3:15 pm, Carl wrote:

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The update scheduling options as good as (or better) than what was  
available since XP which could be set to install updates & reboot  
immediately too, I don't know why ppl harp on about Win10 being so bad  
in this regard.

An example: You can define 'active hours'; a time interval during which  
it's won't automatically restart, and ask first if it wants to outside  
of those hours.

You can defer updates between 1 & 365 days.

And so on...

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--
Cheers,

Chris.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 1:26:32 AM UTC-4, Carl wrote:
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Of course.  You can control that in the setup to have it tell you when an update is available and you select when to install it.  

If nothing else, this is so you don't download 100's of MB on a pay by the MB connection I expect.  

Rick C.  

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 13/09/18 15:34, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Add a second user.  There is always a risk that something - OS, apps,
user - will screw up and mess up user settings to the point of being
unable to log in or unable to do much after logging in.  I've seen it
happen a few times over the years (I have little Win10 experience,
however).  At the very least, make a user for yourself with
administrative privileges and a password that you don't share with the
main user.  Then you stand a better chance of being able to fix things
when everything goes bananas.  (And do /not/ turn on any sort of
encryption on files unless you are on the NSA/CIA short-list.  And if
you are on their lists, don't use Windows at all.)

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Unless you have an odd router setup, sharing (if you want it) should
work with the PC connected to the router by Ethernet and other devices
connected by Wifi.

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Make sure you install Chrome, Firefox or both - and remove all icons and
start menus for MS browsers.  Neither Chrome nor Firefox are entirely
secure, but they are much less insecure.  Consider setting the router to
use OpenDNS rather than the ISP's DNS server, to keep everyone a bit
safer.  And install AdBlock.

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LibreOffice is, IMHO, better than MS Office in most respects.  I'd
choose LibreOffice even if it cost money and MS Office was free.

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If you want your system to be stable, the best idea is to turn off
updates.  I have often seen Windows updates screw up systems and break
programs that were working fine before.  Almost all the "security"
updates are nonsense - they are either totally irrelevant to a home
user, no problem when you avoid MS's browsers, or a hidden way to give
MS more control of your system "to keep it safe".


Even better, given the expected use of the system, is to drop Windows
entirely.  Install Linux Mint instead, and after the brief confusion of
wondering where your anti-virus and anti-malware programs are and why
you have all this software for free, you'll find life much easier.


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 09/13/2018 10:13 AM, David Brown wrote:
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Microsoft says Win 10 will be the last "boxed" release of Windows. The  
idea is now to provide "Windows as a service" and you don't get a DVD  
with an installer that gives you a fairly recent version and install a  
service pack, it's more like there's an app called "Windows" that is  
distributed via the cloud and incrementally updates itself over time,  
with little user control over the process or what it changes.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice

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  No.  One use the Windows Media Creation Tool.  That tool builds a  
current , streamlined ISO at the current release level.

  The ESD iso and 1803 are current.  1803 is what the current update  
blocks are putting on machines.

  There are no multiple versions.  All are on a single ISO.

  Most machines today get KEY locked via their BIOS.

  So my Windows 10 home machine was able to be fully reset and MS saw  
the key and activated it.  They also upgraded it to Windows 10 pro thru  
the store.

  So you must be "toying" with it and then you come here a spout  
bullshit about how you are back to windows 98.

  I doubt you ever used that one right either.

  Maybe the world should just flood again and wipe us all out.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 09/15/2018 07:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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You're just being your usual dramatic self. Oh, you. /yawn

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice

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Thaere is an option to tick relating to 'metered' internet connections  
for that exact reason...

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 09/13/2018 11:45 AM, TTman wrote:
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Win 10 often just ignores this setting.

<https://tech.slashdot.org/story/17/03/20/1339227/windows-10-will-download-some-updates-even-over-a-metered-connection

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
Snip

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Same here from an 'oldy' person. Been on XP and Win 7 and had to switch  
the wife's PC to a WIN 10.... the advice from PC World was to 'say no to  
everything' during the installation process and then tweak it up  
afterwards. Worked fine for me.
  The first time I did it, prior to this advice, it was a nightmare,  
just saying yes to everything....so I had to go back for advice and I'm  
quite tech savvy.... WIN 10 tries to be too clever for it's own good IMO.
There is also an 'app' that emulates the desktop of the familiar Win7  
but I have n experience of that . My wife is happy with her setup so I'm  
reluctant to 'fiddle' less I get an ear bashing !
Hope that helps.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
Thank you all for the advice.  It sounds like it won't be nearly as bad as  
the early Internet screaming made it sound when Win 10 was first released,  
so I don't expect any problems.

--
Regards,
Carl Ijames  


Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On 09/13/2018 07:25 AM, TTman wrote:
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If you use Bing, Cortana, OneDrive or Skype on Win 10, by virtue of  
using it and explicitly or implicitly accepting the EULA you:

"grant to Microsoft a worldwide and royalty-free intellectual property  
license to use Your Content"

as it says in the EULA for those products.


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Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On Wed, 12 Sep 2018 14:49:53 -0400, "Carl"

After you're done with the initials setup, and before you start
butchering, errr... customizing, the PC, I strongly suggest that you
make sure that all the updates are installed.  Right click on what
used to be the "Start" button in the lower left of the screen, and
select "PC Settings".  The "Windoze Update" icon and "Check for
updates".  Do this repeatedly until it declares that all updates are
installed and working.  Then, do it again anyway, because it sometimes
lies.  On a slow DSL line, this can easily take an hour, even with a
fairly new machine, depending on how long the machine has been sitting
in a warehouse.

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Of course it's an obscure setting.  Windoze 10 has the traditional
"control panel" as well as the "PC Settings" page.  There's some
overlap, but in general, MS is trying to migrate all the settings over
the new and improved PC Settings page.  To make you can't possibly
miss the new PC Settings page, MS had contrived 3 different ways to
find it, all of them obscure:
"3 Ways to Open PC Settings on Windows 10"
<https://www.isunshare.com/windows-10/3-ways-to-open-pc-settings-on-windows-10.html

However, you're in luck.  The table mode is in neither the old
"control panel" or then new "PC Settings".  To turn it on and off, you
use yet another page of settings called the "Action Center".  It's
located in the lower right hand corner of the screen.
"Turn tablet mode on or off"
<https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4027960/windows-10-turn-tablet-mode-on-or-off

However, we're not done yet.  Turning on the tablet mode simply
enables a few tablet features.  You now need to change the "make
Windows more touch friendly" setting so that it the machine can
actually be used:
<https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/enable-tablet-mode-windows-10

My free advice is to leave the stupid tablet mode OFF while she is
learning to use the computah.  It's much too easy to do something
stupid by accident in tablet mode, and then spend the day trying to
recover.  Leave that horror for later.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

No, it doesn't need to be turned on, but it should be on and working.
Reading between the lines, I would guess(tm) that it's a laptop, not a
desktop, which she might want to take it to the local coffee shop and
show off her new toy to her friends.  That means the wi-fi should be
ready and working.  However, if it's a desktop, ethernet is better
(because it's faster).

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Well, do you have any devices that need to communicate via BlueGoof? I
have my portable GPS, headset, smartphone(s), BT speakers, and some
stuff I don't want to talk about.  If she's not a gadget freak and
doesn't have any BT toys, then you can safely turn it off and leave it
off.  It can be easily turned on/off using the "Action Center"
mentioned above.  

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Right.  You could turn off the Dell PC and the tablet and iThing will
work normally, if there such a condition for Apple products.

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If you don't like syncing the iPhone and what I assume is an iPad to
the Apple cloud, you can sync that photos and user data to the PC
using iTunes.  Ask someone who is more experienced with Apple products
if this is a good or bad idea.  Most people just sync to the cloud.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Tons.  I have a script that I use for setting up a new machine.  Every
time I use it, I add a few more settings that need to be tweaked.
However, there's no need to inflict my biases on her.  There are some
web sites with some tolerable general setup advice.  There's no need
to do everything these sites suggest, so please consider each
suggestion individually.
<https://www.cnet.com/how-to/13-things-to-tweak-when-setting-up-a-windows-10-laptop/
<https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-set-up-a-new-windows-10-pc-perfectly-in-one-hour-or-less/
<https://lifehacker.com/how-to-set-up-your-windows-laptop-from-scratch-1826146907
etc...  There are also some YouTube videos on the topic:
<


https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=setting+up+Windows+10


To add to the aforementioned, I suggest that you install an image
backup program:
Macrium Reflect (free)
<https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree
It's a very fast and very useful image backup program.  Buy a USB 3.0
external hard disk drive and use it for backing up the Dell PC.  I've
had several Win 10 machines go into a non-recoverable perpetual reboot
mode, where the image backup saved my posterior.

Also, I hate the new "Metro" user interfarce and much prefer the
Windoze 7 desktop look.  I've installed "Classic Shell" on literally
all my customers machines.  Nobody has complained, and many haven't
even noticed the change:
<http://www.classicshell.net
Unfortunately, there some risk involved in this.  Development has
stopped on Classic Shell.  It's just a matter of time before MS
changes something and breaks Classic Shell.  The author has posted the
source code on Sourceforge so there's hope that someone can take of
the maintenance.
<https://sourceforge.net/projects/classicshell/>

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You could do that, but I prefer to let the main user be the
administrator (in order to keep my phone from ringing at odd hours).
So, the first user you create will be an administrator account.  If
there are kids in the house, they will probably get stuck with a
regular (non-admin) account.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The Windoze Defender auntie-virus program supplied with Win 10 is good
enough for viruses and terrible for malware.  For malware, I use the
free version of Malwarebytes.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I personally killed about 15 Kaspersky licenses in the last year or
so, and am schedule to remove a few more for a government contractor:

Prepared"
<https://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2018/09/kaspersky-deadline-approaches-fears-loom-contractors-arent-prepared/151147/
However, It wasn't because of their connection to the Kremlin, but
rather because Eugene Kaspersky previously got caught writing viruses
designed to break the virus scanners of his competitors:
<https://www.reuters.com/article/us-kaspersky-rivals/exclusive-russian-antivirus-firm-faked-malware-to-harm-rivals-ex-employees-idUSKCN0QJ1CR20150814

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I was trying to get away from the computer for a few days and do some
work on the house, car, shop, various toys, etc.  Instead, I have to
deal with one emergency after another.  Now this...


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
"Jeff Liebermann"  wrote in message  

On Wed, 12 Sep 2018 14:49:53 -0400, "Carl"

After you're done with the initials setup, and before you start
butchering, errr... customizing, the PC, I strongly suggest that you
make sure that all the updates are installed.  Right click on what
used to be the "Start" button in the lower left of the screen, and
select "PC Settings".  The "Windoze Update" icon and "Check for
updates".  Do this repeatedly until it declares that all updates are
installed and working.  Then, do it again anyway, because it sometimes
lies.  On a slow DSL line, this can easily take an hour, even with a
fairly new machine, depending on how long the machine has been sitting
in a warehouse.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Of course it's an obscure setting.  Windoze 10 has the traditional
"control panel" as well as the "PC Settings" page.  There's some
overlap, but in general, MS is trying to migrate all the settings over
the new and improved PC Settings page.  To make you can't possibly
miss the new PC Settings page, MS had contrived 3 different ways to
find it, all of them obscure:
"3 Ways to Open PC Settings on Windows 10"
<https://www.isunshare.com/windows-10/3-ways-to-open-pc-settings-on-windows-10.html

However, you're in luck.  The table mode is in neither the old
"control panel" or then new "PC Settings".  To turn it on and off, you
use yet another page of settings called the "Action Center".  It's
located in the lower right hand corner of the screen.
"Turn tablet mode on or off"
<https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4027960/windows-10-turn-tablet-mode-on-or-off

However, we're not done yet.  Turning on the tablet mode simply
enables a few tablet features.  You now need to change the "make
Windows more touch friendly" setting so that it the machine can
actually be used:
<https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/enable-tablet-mode-windows-10

My free advice is to leave the stupid tablet mode OFF while she is
learning to use the computah.  It's much too easy to do something
stupid by accident in tablet mode, and then spend the day trying to
recover.  Leave that horror for later.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

No, it doesn't need to be turned on, but it should be on and working.
Reading between the lines, I would guess(tm) that it's a laptop, not a
desktop, which she might want to take it to the local coffee shop and
show off her new toy to her friends.  That means the wi-fi should be
ready and working.  However, if it's a desktop, ethernet is better
(because it's faster).

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, do you have any devices that need to communicate via BlueGoof? I
have my portable GPS, headset, smartphone(s), BT speakers, and some
stuff I don't want to talk about.  If she's not a gadget freak and
doesn't have any BT toys, then you can safely turn it off and leave it
off.  It can be easily turned on/off using the "Action Center"
mentioned above.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Right.  You could turn off the Dell PC and the tablet and iThing will
work normally, if there such a condition for Apple products.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you don't like syncing the iPhone and what I assume is an iPad to
the Apple cloud, you can sync that photos and user data to the PC
using iTunes.  Ask someone who is more experienced with Apple products
if this is a good or bad idea.  Most people just sync to the cloud.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Tons.  I have a script that I use for setting up a new machine.  Every
time I use it, I add a few more settings that need to be tweaked.
However, there's no need to inflict my biases on her.  There are some
web sites with some tolerable general setup advice.  There's no need
to do everything these sites suggest, so please consider each
suggestion individually.
<https://www.cnet.com/how-to/13-things-to-tweak-when-setting-up-a-windows-10-laptop/
<https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-set-up-a-new-windows-10-pc-perfectly-in-one-hour-or-less/
<https://lifehacker.com/how-to-set-up-your-windows-laptop-from-scratch-1826146907
etc...  There are also some YouTube videos on the topic:
<


https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=setting+up+Windows+10


To add to the aforementioned, I suggest that you install an image
backup program:
Macrium Reflect (free)
<https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree
It's a very fast and very useful image backup program.  Buy a USB 3.0
external hard disk drive and use it for backing up the Dell PC.  I've
had several Win 10 machines go into a non-recoverable perpetual reboot
mode, where the image backup saved my posterior.

Also, I hate the new "Metro" user interfarce and much prefer the
Windoze 7 desktop look.  I've installed "Classic Shell" on literally
all my customers machines.  Nobody has complained, and many haven't
even noticed the change:
<http://www.classicshell.net
Unfortunately, there some risk involved in this.  Development has
stopped on Classic Shell.  It's just a matter of time before MS
changes something and breaks Classic Shell.  The author has posted the
source code on Sourceforge so there's hope that someone can take of
the maintenance.
<https://sourceforge.net/projects/classicshell/>

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You could do that, but I prefer to let the main user be the
administrator (in order to keep my phone from ringing at odd hours).
So, the first user you create will be an administrator account.  If
there are kids in the house, they will probably get stuck with a
regular (non-admin) account.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The Windoze Defender auntie-virus program supplied with Win 10 is good
enough for viruses and terrible for malware.  For malware, I use the
free version of Malwarebytes.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I personally killed about 15 Kaspersky licenses in the last year or
so, and am schedule to remove a few more for a government contractor:
"As Kaspersky Deadline Approaches, Fears Loom That Contractors Aren?t
Prepared"
<https://www.nextgov.com/cybersecurity/2018/09/kaspersky-deadline-approaches-fears-loom-contractors-arent-prepared/151147/
However, It wasn't because of their connection to the Kremlin, but
rather because Eugene Kaspersky previously got caught writing viruses
designed to break the virus scanners of his competitors:
<https://www.reuters.com/article/us-kaspersky-rivals/exclusive-russian-antivirus-firm-faked-malware-to-harm-rivals-ex-employees-idUSKCN0QJ1CR20150814

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I was trying to get away from the computer for a few days and do some
work on the house, car, shop, various toys, etc.  Instead, I have to
deal with one emergency after another.  Now this...


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
On Thu, 13 Sep 2018 21:04:46 -0400, "Carl"

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In that case, definitely install Classic Shell.
Make only two changes to the settings in Classic Shell.
1.  Change the start menu style to Windoze 7 as in:
<
https://images.techhive.com/images/article/2013/10/classic-shell-4-menu-2-100057793-orig.png

2.  Change the start menu button to "classic" and select the middle
button icon that looks like the original start button.  After you
click OK, it will take about a minute for the program to make all the
necessary changes.  Give it a bit of time before trying to use it.

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Minimal (not zero) changes is the idea behind Classic Shell

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WD uses an ancient version of Acronis True Image.  It's a good
program, but I think she might do better with the current version:
<https://www.acronis.com/en-us/personal/computer-backup/
The bad news is $50.  The way I use it is to NOT install it on the
hard disk.  Instead, I use the recovery CD that the program creates,
or can be downloaded from the Acronis web pile.  I boot it and run the
backup program from the CD.  Not having any open files and not having
Windoze running makes for a faster and more reliable image backup.

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Transfer only the files that she created.  In other words, transfer
just the data.  Leave the Vista programs alone and re-install 64 bit
version on the new machine.  Do the Win 10 updates first.  Then make
an image backup so that you can recover cleanly if anything goes
wrong.  Copy the user data files to wherever seems appropriate.  It
will NOT be the exact same directory name as in Vista because Win 10
has a different directly structure than Vista.  Then install the
programs.  You may need to hand edit any config files that you copy
over to fit the new directory structure.

Good luck.  This kind of stuff is easy after you've done it 100 times.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Windows 10 setup and security advice
wrote:

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Oops.  That's totally wrong.  Looks like WD no longer distributes
Acronis True Image.  Now, it's a different program that only backs up
user files and is NOT an image backup program.  So, when your hard
disk or Windoze OS blows up, you get to reload Win 10 from scratch,
update from scratch, reinstall all the programs from scratch,
reinstall the WD backup program, and restore the user files from the
backup.  Yes, it takes forever.  Speed is one reason why I use an
image backup program such as Macrium Reflect.  With USB 3.0 and an i7
CPU, I can typically do 6 to 10 GBytes/minute backup and somewhat less
on restore with Macrium Reflect.  With a typical Win 10 machine having
50GB of files, I can backup everything in 12 to 20 minutes.  You could
probably convince her to run a backup every day, especially if you
save a "backup definition file" and point to it with a desktop
shortcut.

One catch.  Macrium is rather difficult to setup if you're not
familiar with the program.  Email if you're stuck and I'll try to
throw together some install instructions in my non-existent spare
time.

Good luck.


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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