Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars. - Page 7

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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Wed, 12 Jul 2017 17:45:42 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Personal 3D printing won't be the next industrial revolution.  3D
printing is already revolutionizing engineering.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Nonsense.

3D printing is simply making some prototypes easiery to make.

CAD software has to a certain extent revolutionized engineering, but that
is very old news.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Fri, 14 Jul 2017 02:11:27 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Just as PCs made prototypes *faster* and easier to design.  Rather
revolutionary.  Really.

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And 3D printing takes it to the next level.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Actually real engineering companies were using CAD software well before
there was such a thing as a PC. Really.

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That and N/C controlled mills and lathes.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Fri, 14 Jul 2017 05:03:36 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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If you define "real engineering companies" as those who could afford
mainframes, sure.  Everyone else was using rubylith.  Even the IC
guys.
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In exactly that same setting, sure.  *NOT* in everyone's home.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Ever heard of the PDP-8 or the HP CAD workstations that were common well
before the PC?

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3D printers go for less than $200; I see no rush by consumers to buy them.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Fri, 14 Jul 2017 23:49:22 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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So no one really used Rubylith?  IOW, nonsense.

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Exactly my point.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Not what I said.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:02:14 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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The point is that CAD on minicomputers was very minimal.  It was the
domain of the mainframe.  Rubylith was the tool of choice for the
electronics industry.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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<snip>

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That was not my experience.

Yes, companies used Rubylith, but the tool of choice was CAD on minicomputers.

The only mainframe application was Spice.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Sat, 15 Jul 2017 17:23:52 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Bullshit!  Tell that to Boeing.  You're simply clueless.


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Bullshit! Tell that to Hughes Aircraft Company. You're simply clueless.
  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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I never encountered CAD before the micros, so have nothing to add to
the argument.  But I'm enjoying the discussion.
--  
We are geeks.  Resistance is voltage over current.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On 7/16/2017 1:53 PM, Greg Goss wrote:
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I remember Rubylith, and Spice but spice was a simulator, and rubylith a  
layout tool... (?)

there is free spice on the internet for under 30 components.

and free tools from some fab houses for small cheap proto boards now  
too, under $50, gets you a board back

AND I remember laying out circuits for Motorola by hand using "dolls"  
4:1 I think, ...

     anybody ?

Hughes Aircraft Company is fantastic, they did SLQ-32 !
  google that one...


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
says...
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I've worked on CAE software that's tightly integrated with CAD my entire  
professional life.  Back in about 1988 our CAD/CAE software still ran on  
mainframes (IBM, DEC, and etc.) but the transition to Unix workstations  
was in its infancy.  Back then, PCs were "toys" that quite simply  
couldn't handle professional level CAD/CAE software.

In the early 1990s Unix Workstations dominated for running CAD/CAE  
software.  A good SGI "box" would run you about $20k in early 1990s  
dollars (about $33k today).  

Today, you can comfortably run CAD/CAE software (at least the CAE  
pre/post) on a sub $2k PC running Windows OS.  But many customers will  
go quite a bit over $2k with things like solid state drives and 64 GB or  
more of RAM coupled with the best professional graphics card money can  
buy (no, they're not quite the same as consumer/gaming cards).  Still,  
the most "decked out" PC workstation today will still cost a fraction of  
what a Unix workstation used to cost in the early 1990s.

So again, we see yet another example of improving technologies driving  
down costs in a market.

Jeff
--  
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.  
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,  
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On 7/16/2017 8:51 AM, Jeff Findley wrote:
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key to that is the higher level of integration on the PC Chips, more  
functions were pulled into fewer pieces of silicon.
and the maturing of PC software, it was quite unstable, Win 3.1 ? etc...
Win XP had good stability, not as good as Unix.

the Telcos ran Unix for decades, very reliable and hated PCs (unreliable)

Unix sort of split into Linux (low cost) and HP UNIX (high end, high  
cost on high cost hardware) Which slowly ran HP into the ground.

I was offered a mainframe computer with 8 remote stations, (1990's) but  
I had to haul it from a second story down, and in evaluating it, it had  
less power than a PC (AT) at the time, and  custom software, custom  
software apps... I turned it down. Big Boat Anchor.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Nope, what we see is yet another example of consumer demand driving down
manufacturing costs by encouraging high volume, automated, manufacturing.
  
--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
says...
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Bullshit.  The technology in a PC today is quite different than that of  
a PC made in 1988.  Nothing in a PC from 1988 would even "plug into" a  
PC bought today, except maybe the keyboard and mouse.  And the PC today  
is literally orders of magnitude faster.  

Jeff
--  
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.  
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,  
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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So what?

Nothing from a 1988 Ford F150 would even "plug into" a Ford F150 bought today.

BTW, a current Ford F150 costs about the same (in adjusted dollars) as a
1988 Ford F150 and does not perform significantly differently.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Lug nuts.  Maybe whole wheels.  Antifreeze.  Gasoline (so long as we
stay this side of 1972 or so.)  Does Ford still use a different tranny
fluid than everyone else like they did in the seventies?

Are modern "power points" heat resistant enough to take an old
cigarette lighter?

Has the trailer ball hitch changed since WW2?  I realize that "hidden
hitch" sockets are a newer idea, but the old trailers can still be
"plugged in".  You might need an adapter for the lights on the
trailer.

The controls have stayed remarkably steady.  You've got the PRNDL
tranny setting, probably using a lever identical to the one thirty
years ago.  You've got the steering wheel and two pedals.  
--  
We are geeks.  Resistance is voltage over current.

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