Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars. - Page 3

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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On 7/6/2017 8:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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He has already shown he does not have any.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Wed, 05 Jul 2017 23:30:45 -0700, Fred J. McCall

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So's your old man.  (what a loser!)

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On 7/5/2017 9:12 PM, Fred J. McCall wrote:
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you already said that. twice now.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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You fail to understand so much, this is just one tiny thing among
many.


--  
"Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the
 truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong."
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

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The Altair was obsolete in two years.  The Apple ][ was obsolete in
five, though genius level reworkings kept it going for what, 12?  The
context for that quote was the decision to build a computer with ten
times the memory capacity of the normal business computer out there at
the time, with the expectation that they would totally revamp the
design in a few years.  Remember that was the time when Microsoft bet
big on Unix as the next big thing.  Nobody expected to be finding ISA
compatible computers running a compatible OS 35 years later.


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--  
We are geeks.  Resistance is voltage over current.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
says...
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True, the big dumb cylindrical pressure vessel may not apply but, that's  
not the entire aircraft.

If the "mass were already gone from the design" then GE would not be  
pouring literally millions of dollars into developing a one meter cubed  
3D printer presumably for printing aircraft engine parts.  

Landing gear, and all other structural moving parts, is surely another  
area on aircraft which could use this technology.  Landing gear make up  
a significant percentage of an aircraft's total dry mass, so this would  
be a likely candidate for shape optimization and 3D printing.

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Yes, many times.  I've got a b.s. in aerospace engineering, so I know  
the basics.  Many of our customers are aerospace, so I have to  
understand the domain.
  
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This is quite short sighted.  I'm sure the same was said about  
composites when they were in their infancy.  Today it would be quite  
hard (i.e. likely impossible) to point to something commercial that  
flies and carries people commercially that has absolutely zero composite  
content.  

I can say that shape optimization coupled with 3D printing is one of the  
"bleeding edge" topics in my industry.  It's really no secret, you can  
surely Google hundreds of articles on the topic.  I really can't go into  
further details, but my profession is in writing engineering software,  
so I ought to know.  

Jeff
--  
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.  
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,  
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Again, you are talking about niche applications and landing gear are not
that big a part of an aircrafts weight.

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An irrelevant red herring to the subject of 3D printing. There are a HUGE
number of different composite materials out there and it has taken well
over half a century for most aircraft to have even a small fraction of
composite materials in their construction.

Note the word "most".

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Whoopee. It is still niche.

Does anyone care about a shape optimized 4 slice toaster or filing cabinet?


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--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Tuesday, 4 July 2017 19:16:09 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com  wrote:

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Today no. In 50 years I reckon they will, as shape optimised means a fraction of the material used.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Yes.  I do.

If any significant number of items in your house are fabricated, it makes sense  
to use as few raw materials as possible, so, for example, it would make sense to  
honeycomb the inside of a knife handle, since it would still be strong enough,  
and would allow you to keep a gram or two of material "in the pot" for other  
projects.

Ditto everything you make.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Wednesday, 5 July 2017 07:21:07 UTC+1, David Mitchell  wrote:
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Fast forward well into the future & your household goods will be regularly reprinted to new designs that use ever less material.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Nonsense; the items in one's house are based on price not how elegantly
it was produced.

It makes no sense to honeycomb the inside of a knife handle as it would
add no functionality and just increase the price.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
says...
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Lightweight metal silverware is a bit of a niche area, but there is an  
existing market.  Titanium spork is a popular item for backpackers.  
It's insane how light those things are.  Backpackers will spend big  
bucks to shave an ounce off of a piece of equipment.

Jeff
--  
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.  
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,  
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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What do you think the market may be for 3D printed frizzens?

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Thursday, 6 July 2017 00:16:09 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com  wrote:

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frozen in time


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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What price?

It would reduce both the time to fabricate and feedstock used, albeit at the  
cost of slightly more complex software.

They form the only metric which makes sense when talking about fabricating objects.

So, by that metric, they're cheaper.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...
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Some people do like to buy exotic things.  Some people even buy  
expensive things thinking that if they cost more they *must* be better,  
right?  Hell, I know a few "foodies" who would likely buy "lightweight"  
silverware just to have as a conversation piece at their next dinner  
party.

My local Kroger carries a few knives with ceramic blades.  One could ask  
why of that as well, but they're there on the shelf.  Someone must be  
buying them since they've been around for several years.  

Jeff
--  
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.  
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,  
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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The manufacturing cost which increases the retail sales price at the store.

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Or you could injection mold it, as most knife handles are, for a fraction
of the manufacturing cost of the honyecomb nonsense.

Or you could stamp the whole thing out of metal for a fraction of the cost
of the honyecomb nonsense.

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The only metric which makes sense for fabricating objects is the loaded
manufacturing cost.

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If an injection molded handle costs a fraction of a cent while the honeycomb
handle costs several cents, which is cheaper?


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Thu, 6 Jul 2017 16:34:29 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Manufacturing cost and sales price are only loosely correlated.

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Yes but not because of sales price, rather profit.

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Not the one with the better ad agency.  ;-)

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
In sci.physics snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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For government projects mainly but not for consumer products.

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profit = sales price - loaded manufacturing cost

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--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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No, for everything, actually.

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True but irrelevant, since 'sales price' can be anything the
manufacturer cares to charge.


--  
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
 territory."
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