Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars. - Page 12

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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Since you're still ignoring the system I cited, let me explain *it* to you:
polymers are pumped into a tank, a laser scans it, hardening it in places.

Note there's no moving "deposition system", just a moving "hardening system".

Obviously, the speed of operation depends on the rate at which polymer is pumped  
in, and the rate at which the top layer is scanned and hardened.

This depends on the intensity of the laser, and the number of lasers, in theory  
you could have dozens.

This would, obviously, make it faster than a single head; which is already the  
fastest 3-D printer in the world.

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Not necessary in the above; but carry on.

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Note that this doesn't have to be particularly accurate if you are tracking the  
deposition system with a laser, which *is* precise, so you're not squirting a  
fine trickle, you're firehosing it out, at the highest speed it can be hardened;  
with multiple heads, if you want.

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As you can see from the above, this just isn't true.

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As you can see from the above, this just isn't true.

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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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The the hardening system is moving and not the deposition system is a minor
nit.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_printing_processes

Nothing particularly new or Earth shaking and it also just prints plastic.

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You certainly are a naive nob.

What do you think positions the hardner?

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Christ you are a naive nob.

The level has to be controlled rather carefully.

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Yeah, I forgot about the print in a bucket techniques.

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Change the above to "deposited or hardened" and the problem is fixed.

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--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Not at all, since it's your claim that "we are already at the limit of  
deposition rate" which you assert imposes limits on the process.
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"10 to 100 times faster"

and it also just prints plastic.

"The entire polymer family".  Plastics do have quite a lot of useful properties.  
  Apparently they're the future.

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Just watch the video: http://www.popsci.com/fastest-3-d-printer-ever
The laser scans the surface of the material, from below.
Four lasers would be four times as fast.

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I know you won't have heard of it; but there's this thing called adaptive  
control; and you can use it to raise and lower the plate below which the  
material comes so it's at precisely the right height above the surface you're  
building on.  I know, right?!

It's also very fast, obviously, even when I first started working in embedded  
systems 35 years ago, we could drive a hydraulic chisel over a surface at  
5cm/second with sufficient accuracy using an 8-bit processor running at 16MHz.

Things have rather improved since then.

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Nice to see you actually learn something.


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:


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And again a quarter century later.  I'm assuming that he was
semi-quoting a 1967 movie.
--  
We are geeks.  Resistance is voltage over current.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

<snip>

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Puerile idiot.

*plonk*


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Always gracious in defeat, is Jim.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Monday, 17 July 2017 23:01:09 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com  wrote:
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Plastic containing metal powder can cool faster due to more thermal conduction. Printing onto 5 sides not 1 may or may not have its place. Preprinted blanks can be printed onto. Household objects don't need to be printed fast anyway. etc etc etc.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Monday, 17 July 2017 18:01:12 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com  wrote:
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Ie one can use thick layers followed by progressively finer, and a fine finish. Among other techniques.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) noted this is a  
problem with 3D-printing, that there is wide variation in results and  
quality even in 3D-prints of objects by the same process:

NIST ADDRESSES METAL 3D PRINTER CHALLENGES WITH DIGITAL THREAD STRATEGY.
BEAU JACKSON 2017-07-17 8:17 PM
[quote]
In collaboration with Duck Bong Kim at Tennessee Technological University  
(TTU), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has  
published a study addressing three of the challenges to production-ready  
metal 3D printing.
The proposed model could eventually form a standard for 3D printed metal  
parts and aid additive manufacturing through the certification process ?  
often seen as a primary barrier to progress.[/quote]
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/nist-addresses-metal-3d-printer-challenges-digital-thread-strategy-118409/

They propose solutions based on a uniformity of the digital information  
provided both before and after processing.

  Bob Clark



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize  
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital  
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--  


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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On the other hand see this:

Navy Partnership Goes to New Depths with First 3D-Printed Submarine.
JULY 20, 2017
https://energy.gov/eere/articles/navy-partnership-goes-new-depths-first-3d-printed-submarine

It's a 3D-printing of a carbon-fiber submarine hull. Judging by the video  
the finish is quite smooth in this case, which would be required for a  
submarine.


  Bob Clark


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--  


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Exactly what a 3D printer is usefull for, a one off prototype.
  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Monday, 17 July 2017 06:11:33 UTC+1, David Mitchell  wrote:
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then one can go beyond it. Print a layer then fan, or print a layer and embed sand particles, or print onto previously printed blanks to save time etc.

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The first televisors were pretty crude too. 30 lines, 2" screen, no sync. Today almost everyone in the 1st world has access to tv. Strati was not meant to be a quality car, it was just meant to function.

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The point that he is incapable of grasping the points.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Monday, 17 July 2017 06:11:33 UTC+1, David Mitchell  wrote:
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then one can go beyond it. Print a layer then fan, or print a layer and embed sand particles, or print onto previously printed blanks to save time etc.

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The first televisors were pretty crude too. 30 lines, 2" screen, no sync. Today almost everyone in the 1st world has access to tv. Strati was not meant to be a quality car, it was just meant to function.

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The point that he is incapable of grasping the points.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

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The amount of aluminum in a soda can has decreased dramatically over
time.  I remember seeing an article on can engineering in SciAm twenty
or so years ago.  It's probably halfed again since then.

Cars once had frames under the body.  Now, carefully shaped bodies
serve the purpose that once required a frame.  

New technologies can dramatically reduce the amount of aluminum or
plastic that you require to do something.

You can overdo it.  My mother believed in bulk purchasing and in
having suitable treats on hand when the grandkids arrived.  When
preparing the estate, we discovered a five foot stack of soda in one
of the closets.  One flat (24 cans) of Costco "Simply" cola had
pinhole-ruptured almost all of the cans, but had leaked slowly enough
that nothing sprayed and nothing escaped the cardboard flat that the
cans were sitting on.  The white carpet under the dark brown leaks was
untouched.  All of the plastic two-litre bottles had lost their
pressurization - the CO2 having presumably leaked past the caps in the
time since purchase.  (She was in various forms of care for about a
year before the end, and we held the house off the market for another
five months for price-cycle reasons.  I don't know how long the soda
was there before she went into care.)

--  
We are geeks.  Resistance is voltage over current.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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This actually hurts your point. A dozen or more years ago, no one would have  
imagined using phones for what we use them for now.

And really a smart phone is just a tiny computer that happens to make phone  
calls. Again, it's the same argument made decades ago but folks not needing  
computers in the home.

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I'd have to poll, but at least 2 I'm sure of, and I think the number is  
closer to 6.  And if I include access to them at libraries, workerspaces,  
etc. then easily dozens.

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Really? You need to get out more. I'd say the number of folks I know who own  
3D printers is about the same as those who own the other items you mention.

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That is basically your claim.

--  
Greg D. Moore                   http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Very few people want a computer in their home, most people want an
entertainment device.

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I will admit I know very few teenagers.

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Yet another knee jerker that reads what they think was written and not
what was actually written.
  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Friday, 14 July 2017 18:16:11 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com  wrote:

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Oh. I thought a smartphone was a computer, and that they were highly popular.


NT

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:

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Chimp, when everyone sees you saying something you insist you haven't
said, the problem is not everyone else...


--  
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
 territory."
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Exactly. Because people who claimed that "no one needs a computer in their  
homes" was basing the usage model on a very limited viewpoint of how  
computers were being used.
But those "entertainment devices" are at their heart computers.

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Which has jacksquat to do with what I said? What do teenagers have to do  
with my reply?

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You keep doing that. I suggest you stop.


--  
Greg D. Moore                   http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Irrelevant to the point.

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It would be primarily teenagers that would be interested in making  
essentially useless gadgets and jewelry.

Again, I know about a dozen people that own things like welders, milling
machines, drill presses, and lathes but no one that owns a 3D printer.

All of these are middle aged or older adults.

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When you stop knee jerking and read what was actually written.  

--  
Jim Pennino

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