Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars. - Page 11

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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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BTW, there is this new innovation:

The World's First Home Robotic Chef Can Cook Over 100 Meals.
Eustacia Huen , CONTRIBUTOR.
OCT 31, 2016 @ 11:17 PM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/eustaciahuen/2016/10/31/the-worlds-first-home-robotic-chef-can-cook-over-100-meals/#575543397228

These robotic arms put a five-star chef in your kitchen - YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKCVol2iWcc


I'm sure quite a few people would push the button for fresh baked bread.


  Bob Clark


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Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
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--  


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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I'm sure that at a price of $92,000 very few people will have the  
slightest interest in it.

People that have the money to blow on such gadgets are more likely to
hire help.  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Sat, 15 Jul 2017 16:11:20 -0400, "Robert Clark"

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How long does it take to clean after it cooks your evening meal?

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

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I seem to recall the promotional videos said it does it's own cleaning.  
Here's the company web page:

http://www.moley.com/

  Bob Clark


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize  
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital  
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--  


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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So what? They don't need to be cheaper. People literally buy millions of  
items made out of aluminum and plastic every day and throw them out, the  
material is so cheap.


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Such as? Seriously, you don't think new technologies and concepts are  
possible?  Heck, if nothing else, you can design printers with multiple  
heads if you want to. Bam, you've nearly doubled printing speed for many  
items.

And as others in this thread have pointed out, "so what". Load up your  
materials, load the file, hit print and go to bed.

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And yet, the industry is thriving and many people do.

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Under $200, I don't think any of my friends are that cheap. The ones I know  
have opted for more expensive, more capable printers.

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So, stop being a kneejerker.

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--  
Greg D. Moore                   http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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So the raw material for 3D printing is more expensive than the raw material
for legacy fabrication methods and my response was to the two sentences
above mine. Try reading them before knee jerking.  
  
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As I have already said many times accuracy is directly related to layer
thickness and layer application delay is directly related to layer
"hardening" time.

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As I have already said many times such is irrelevant for hobby applications.

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The industry for both consumer and industrial 3D printers is tiny and
few people do.

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The fact that someone you know paid more than $200 for a 3D printer is
irrelvant to the fact that such can be had for under $200.

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I'm not the one with panties in a wad because 3D printers are not being
properly worshipped.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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We're nowhere near those limits yet.
"The BAAM was used to manufacture the first (almost) fully 3D printed car, the  
Strati, for together with Local Motors. With a deposition rate of up to 38 lbs  
of material per hour, it is possibly the fastest machine currently on the market."


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Sales of 400,000 last year, projected sales of 1.2 million this one.  Also  
appears to be non-linear.

But that it's tiny now is irrelevant.  How many people had early telephones?  Or  
TV sets?


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On 7/16/2017 1:16 AM, David Mitchell wrote:
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what is the material it is made from? Polyethylene?
Milk Bottle Plastic ?
crash safety ?
leave it out in the hot sun in Aridzona in the summer ??

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 9:45:41 AM UTC-7, Serg io wrote:
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Most 3D materials come in wire spools.  So, it is too flexible for any practical purpose, other than just demo prototypes.  We might try to feed it with harder plastic, with a custom melter/feeder.

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Fully recyclable thermoplastic so you can grind up your $30,000 golf
cart when you are done playing with it.

The printing speed is achieved by using thick layers which makes the finish
horrible. Check out the finish in the photo near the end.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strati_ (automobile)


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

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Again, SpaceX 3-D prints rocket engine combustion chambers and
turbopump parts.  I think it will stand up to Arizona in the summer if
it will stand up to rocket exhaust.


--  
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
 territory."
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Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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The whooshing sound you hear is the point and all it's details going
over you head.

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The Strati is little more than a $30,000 golf cart and the finish is an
abomination.

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Do you understand the difference between hobby and professional?
  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Not really - for example, if we're not at the limits of layer hardening time,  
then we can use multiple print heads, multiplying the print rate.
I thought that was apparent, apparently I needed to explain it.

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Not the point, remember the whole "mature technology" thing?
If we can do that *now*, imagine what we'll be able to do in 30 years time.

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I'm not sure what point you're trying to make by ignoring those stats.


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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But we are at those limits as well as how fast we can lay down a layer
without slopping it around.

Did you think the issue is how fast a stepper motor goes or how fast you
can squeeze something out of a nozzle?

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Yes, it is the whole point.

They get speed by using thick layers as there is no other way to do it. This
results in a crap finish.

And this IS an industrial grade printer.

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Obviously.  

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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First of all, there are other technologies, the second of the new printers I  
posted uses one of them.

Second, even something as simple as adding more print heads would multiply the  
printing speed, as I've explained twice now.

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Simply not true, see my points above.

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So?
The first ordinary printers were "industrial", and now we have better ones in homes.
What's your point?

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And yet here you are, not explaining it.
Perhaps you don't have one.


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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<snip>

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All the technologies squirt out something that has liquid properties and
then is hardened somehow, all of them.

There are no Star Trek replicators where a complete object forms out of
thin air.

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What part of we are already at the limit of deposition rate is it you can not
grasp?

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Yes, it is true. Look at the pictures of the thing and read the companies
own press releases.


--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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Apart from those which don't, such as laser sinterers, or those, such as the one  
I linked to, which hardens a resin with a laser.

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No-one has ever claimed there are.

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The part where you saying it makes it true: it's not.
Unless you can prove me wrong, it's your claim after all, so feel free to  
provide evidence.

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There were two links posted - I notice you're completely ignoring the second.
There are also other kinds of 3-D printer, and different types will be invented.
Can you honestly not see that, or are you just ignoring it, because you know  
you've lost this particular argument?


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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What part of "is hardened somehow" did you fail to understand?

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You were by claiming there are "other technologies".

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What do YOU think limits deposition rate, the speed of stepper motors?

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I see you are ignoring the close up photo showing that what I said is true.
  
And again, there is only one type of 3D printer; a machine that takes
a material that has fluid properties and deposits it in thin layers
which are then hardened.

It makes no difference if the material is thermoplastic that has been
heated and then allowed to cool or micronized metal particles which are
then sintered together with a laser or electron beam machine.

--  
Jim Pennino

Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
snipped-for-privacy@specsol.spam.sux.com wrote:
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The bit where you can't imagine 16 laser heads working together?
Or that the technology mentioned above pumps fluid in at a rate of knots?

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Don't be silly.
Neither traditional laser sintering, nor the other technology I cited "squirt  
out something that has liquid properties" unless by "squirt" you mean "pump"  
into a tank.

They are very different to a movable head which deposits material in a 3-D pattern.

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Yes; and we're nowhere near the limits of those, the deposition rate FOR THAT  
KIND OF 3-D PRINTER, and multiple printer heads would solve that because,  
hardening time is not at its upper bound yet.

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True for that kind of printer, at the moment, and you're still ignoring the  
other kinds of technology.  It's getting embarrassing.

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Just not true.  FFS neither of the other two kinds of fabricator I mentioned  
work in that way.  Read the article!


Re: Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.
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Since you are such a dense littlt twit, I will type slowly so that you
may understand.

A 3D printer consists of 3 primary system:

1: The postioning system.

This is the part of the machine that moves the deposition system, what ever
it may be, around.

This system is decended from XY protters and NC machinery, technology
that is over a half century old and fully matured shortly after the
microprocessor became commercially available over 40 years ago.

2: The deposition system.

This is the part of the machine that deposits the material being printed,
whatever it may be.

All deposition depend on the material having liquid properties, at least
for some time.

For thermoplastic printers the solid plastic is melted in the deposition
system and applied through a nozzle.

For metal printers, the solid metal is in a micronized form such that
it can be forced through a nozzle of some sort. The metal powder may
or may not have a carrier material added to make the process easier.

There is no way to "print" a material other than to squirt it in very
small quantities (assuming one desires some sort of accuracy) out
of a small oriface of some sort.

The accuracy of the final printed product is directly related to how
small an amount of material can be deposited at one time.

3: The hardening system.

This is the part of the machine that hardens the the printed material.

For a thermoplastic machine this may consist of nothing more than allowing
air flow around the printed such that a given print pass can cool before
the next print pass is applied.

For a metal machine, there are several hardening methods, such as laser
and electron beam sintering.


--  
Jim Pennino

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