The Tesla Winter

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There is only one aspect of BEVs that I am not going to enjoy.  That is the
 loss of range in the winter.  I have a garage, but it has been storing a s
ki boat for some years now and that is going to have to change.  Not sure w
here I'll put it, but it can't stay here.  

That said, I believe the temp in the basement garage will get down to 50 or
 so in the winter.  I'll be keeping closer watch on the temps.  I do know a
t freezing temps the battery range drops significantly.  

There is also the issue of "preconditioning" the battery.  I was visiting a
 friend and tried using that when connected via a 120 volt outlet with poor
 results.  Seems the outlet doesn't provide enough power to heat everything
 being heated and the range actually dropped.  lol  So after 20 minutes I s
aw the range reduce and stopped it.  Next time she will have a 50 amp 240 v
olt outlet which will do the trick for sure.  Also I will be able to drive  
there with only one charging stop since I normally charge about 50 miles fr
om her place so it is relatively topped off when I arrive.  That will make  
driving the Tesla about the same as driving the truck, one fueling/food sto
p on a 500 mile trip.  

One leg will be 260 miles and so a bit iffy depending on how the cold affec
ts the battery.  I can't say yet if a just charged battery (assuming it's u
p to temperature) will have the same range in the winter as in summer.  I'l
l find out soon enough.  

Presently my problem is a shorter trip I regularly take.  120 miles one way
, a couple days of local driving with few charging opportunities, then 120  
miles back.  So far I have not once made it back without some sort of charg
ing even if it was just from a 120 volt outlet.  The location seems to have
 a paucity of charging other than the very slow J1772 type connectors.  The
re is a Chademo (DC fast) charger at a MOM's store and they have a Tesla ad
apter ($500 if I want my own).  I wanted to use it last weekend and someone
 in a new Nissan was charging.  When they were charged I tried using a phon
e app to send them a message about it and it wouldn't work, possibly becaus
e they had a temporary tag with a number format which wasn't compatible wit
h the app.  Don't know, no error, it just didn't respond to the button.  I  
asked in the store and the best they could do was to give me a pre-printed  
slip to put under their windshield.  Oh well.  

I'm going to look into what I can do to promote installation of chargers th
ere, especially a bank of superchargers.  It is no small city and is an int
ersection of several highways.  If it wasn't so close to DC and Baltimore i
t likely would have had a bank of Superchargers right off the bat.  Instead
 they have Superchargers 25 miles up the road in the next city.  

  Rick C.  

  Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

Re: The Tesla Winter
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la adapter ($500 if I want my own).  I wanted to use it last weekend and so
meone in a new Nissan was charging.  When they were charged I tried using a
 phone app to send them a message about it and it wouldn't work, possibly b
ecause they had a temporary tag with a number format which wasn't compatibl
e with the app.  Don't know, no error, it just didn't respond to the button
.  I asked in the store and the best they could do was to give me a pre-pri
nted slip to put under their windshield.  Oh well.  

Does Tesla have priority over Nissan?  Who build these chargers?  I am prob
ably ending up with a Nissan,  So, just asking.

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there, especially a bank of superchargers.  It is no small city and is an i
ntersection of several highways.  If it wasn't so close to DC and Baltimore
 it likely would have had a bank of Superchargers right off the bat.  Inste
ad they have Superchargers 25 miles up the road in the next city.  

I have problem finding chargers for my computer and phone on the road, not  
to mansion car.  Businesses are still reluctant to give out pennies with 12
0V outlets.  Good luck asking them for dollars.


Re: The Tesla Winter
On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 12:23:59 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wro
te:
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esla adapter ($500 if I want my own).  I wanted to use it last weekend and  
someone in a new Nissan was charging.  When they were charged I tried using
 a phone app to send them a message about it and it wouldn't work, possibly
 because they had a temporary tag with a number format which wasn't compati
ble with the app.  Don't know, no error, it just didn't respond to the butt
on.  I asked in the store and the best they could do was to give me a pre-p
rinted slip to put under their windshield.  Oh well.  
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obably ending up with a Nissan,  So, just asking.

No priority, first come, first serve.  But you should return to move your a
uto when the charge is complete.  I have a Tesla app that tells me the char
ge status with alerts when it is almost done and done.  I don't know if Nis
san has that, but I would expect so.  

The interoperability of chargers and connectors seems a bit of a mess.  Jap
an, Europe and Tesla all have different connectors and I'm not sure how int
eroperable they are.  A Tesla comes with a J-1772 adapter and they have Cha
demo adapters you can buy, otherwise everything is aftermarket.  

Tesla has Superchargers which are fast DC chargers with a 300 mile/hour rat
e (120 kW).  There are also Tesla only "destination" chargers which are jus
t high current 240 VAC with a Tesla connector.  

Other fast DC chargers in the US include the Chademo network which is about
 half that rate and a CCS network which seems to be much more popular in Eu
rope.  These tend to top out at about half the Tesla rate, ~50 kW.  

Then there are the AC chargers which are just 240 volts at various current  
levels up to around 19 kW.  

None of this is clear to me.  Too many standards, networks and cell phone a
pps.  There doesn't seem to be a single, common source for information and  
in particular location and availability of chargers.  The Tesla system is g
reat if they are where you want to use them.  There are many more other net
works, but mostly they are only good for overnight charging.  


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s there, especially a bank of superchargers.  It is no small city and is an
 intersection of several highways.  If it wasn't so close to DC and Baltimo
re it likely would have had a bank of Superchargers right off the bat.  Ins
tead they have Superchargers 25 miles up the road in the next city.  
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t to mansion car.  Businesses are still reluctant to give out pennies with  
120V outlets.  Good luck asking them for dollars.

???  I find some places don't make Wifi easy.  But can't you charge everyth
ing in your car?  Even my truck has half a dozen cig lighter sockets for po
wering devices.  The Tesla comes with USB power as well.  I may have to fin
d the "right" restaurant to get an outlet near a booth or counter so I'm no
t tripping people with the cord.  

Every aspect of car charging should be organically integrated with the car.
  The Tesla shows you maps with Superchargers indicated.  That's not always
 the best solution.  Once I stayed overnight in a hotel and had to charge i
n the morning before I could leave, so an hour spinning my wheels at a mall
.  Turns out the hotel had a slow charger which would have done the job ove
rnight while I slept if I had known.  

Early days, early days...

  Rick C.  
  
  Tesla referral code -- https://ts.la/richard11209

Re: The Tesla Winter
On 11/17/2018 06:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Average battery range in the Volt in summer is around 65, wintertime  
around 42, 43 miles at best. The engine switches on occasionally for  
about a minute every 20 minutes or so when it's below around 27, 28  
degrees F to assist with heating the cabin and keeping the battery  
coolant at optimal temperature.

The only time the actual drivetrain has given me trouble in the winter  
was one morning when it was about -15 F, I got a "Propulsion Power  
Reduced" warning and the car's acceleration was sluggish for a couple  
minutes until everything warmed up, after that it was fine


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Re: The Tesla Winter
On 11/18/2018 05:16 PM, bitrex wrote:
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During very hot weather maybe 90 degrees F + there's some kind of  
auxiliary cooling blower or pump that comes on to cool the power  
electronics, you can hear it running under the hood when plugged in  
outside in the sun even with the ignition shut down

Re: The Tesla Winter
On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 4:21:46 PM UTC-6, bitrex wrote:
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hat  

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Yeah, batteries don't like hot any more than they like cold.  I watched a v
ideo on how they cool the Tesla batteries and it's interesting.  They also  
heat them in the winter using waste heat from the motors, etc. along with t
he cabin.  

  Rick C.  

  Tesla referral code --- https://ts.la/richard11209

Re: The Tesla Winter
On 11/18/2018 05:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Since the Volt has a gas-burner towed along with anyway I guess they  
figured they'd just use electric heat to save cost on a more complicated  
heat exchange system, and when it's really cold a little boost from the  
ICE now and then to keep the power draw down somewhat when running cabin  
heater when on electric. When driving on gas in the winter cabin heat  
operates via engine coolant loop exchange as normal AFAIK.

as a New England native "cold" maybe doesn't make me quite as  
uncomfortable as folks from warmer climates, I generally don't use the  
cabin heat at all unless it's below freezing outside; anything warmer  
than that and just the heated wheel, heated seats, and a jacket or coat  
is good enough for me. -15 is a different story tho that's some  
Arctic-type cold and I definitely wouldn't have to live with that shit  
day after day for very long. Plunges into the double digit negatives are  
fortunately fairly rare in the Boston area, maybe once or twice a year.

New England is like the platonic ideal of a "temperate" climate I guess,  
every season is kind of a caricature of itself. The Volt has been a  
great all-season car tho aside from that one time it's always started up  
and run great in all conditions, deep snow, 95+ F heat, torrential  
summer downpours.

About the only "mod" I've made is swap out the stock ultra-low-rolling  
resistance Goodyear tires for some Continental PureContacts with a lil  
more traction. The stock are nice for California probably but they wore  
out fast here and never provided very good grip, easy to spin them out  
with that high torque motor on even slightly slick pavement. Only a  
small range/fuel economy reduction with the PureContacts that I noticed.
I've thought about getting fog lights installed, they're a factory  
option easily done at the dealer, but haven't gotten around to it yet,  
they're not just for show the fog can be pretty treacherous around here  
in fall particularly can hardly see the side of the road.






Re: The Tesla Winter
On 11/17/18 6:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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And in heated garages the salt-induced corrosion speeds up  
significantly.  It's always something. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: The Tesla Winter
On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 5:08:21 PM UTC-6, Phil Hobbs wrote:
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 the loss of range in the winter.  I have a garage, but it has been storing
 a ski boat for some years now and that is going to have to change.  Not su
re where I'll put it, but it can't stay here.
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0 or so in the winter.  I'll be keeping closer watch on the temps.  I do kn
ow at freezing temps the battery range drops significantly.
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What heated garage?  A garage that is attached to a house is "heated"?  

  Rick C.  

  Tesla referral code ---- https://ts.la/richard11209

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