Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.

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The cords used on radios, televisions, and other electronics are 18ga
or 16ga copper wire encased in plastic. It's a little known fact that
every year those cords lose 10% of their electrons. By the 7th or 8th
year, these cords are incapable of providing enough power to the
electronic devices, which causes the electronics to fail. After ten
years, these cords can hardly transfer any electric current, because
there are few electrons left to carry the current. At this stage, all
electronics fail due to a lack of proper voltage and amperage coming
from the power source.  

There is no known way to replenish the electrons in these copper
cords, so they must be replaced at least every five years. It's
recommended to replace them every three years on costly equipment to
eliminate electronic component failure.

You can increase the life span of cords by using a thicker copper
wire, such as 12ga or 10ga, but it is still recommended that they be
replaced at least every eight years.


Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
snipped-for-privacy@altro.com writes
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Only the ones used on DC, but you can get a year extra by reversing  
them.

Brian
--  
Brian Howie

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 27/11/2017 10:17, Brian Howie wrote:
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Put them in a microwave for 30 seconds and all the electrons will be  
restored to 100%

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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
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I think you should be more aware of them losing the plasticizers
(is that correct English?  Google translate says so...) causing risk
of insulation damage and resulting hazards.

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
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Yes that's correct terminology.

I have some rubber cables here, 40+ years old and they seem as good as
new. and some 10 year old PVC cables with cracked insulation.

--  
This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software  

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 27/11/2017 23:26, Rob wrote:
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Yes, the PAT (portable appliance testing) sticky tags (that are requred  
now for health and safety) seem to leach a lot of placticizers out of  
the cable, turning the sticker into a very sticky mess each year, and  
presumably depriving the cable of whatever benefit (flexibility?) was  
due to the plasticizer in the first place. If it gets to the point where  
the insulation cracks and the wiring shorts out, there is usually a lot  
of kindling (PAT labels of all the other cords) nearby, which would  
presumably help to sustain the fire. I wonder whether they have done a  
risk assessment. Maybe if the labels were printed on asbestos paper...

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Monday, November 27, 2017 at 4:11:13 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@altro.com wrote:
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So that is why I see the power company replacing the copper wires that make up the power grid every three years.
.

                                           Dan

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 27/11/2017 23:56, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:
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In some places they were allowed to pass on the cost of such maintenence  
/ upgrades to customers, plus a fixed percentage markup as profit. How  
do you maximise profit, when it is a fixed percentage of the  
repair/upgrade cost? Make sure the repairs/upgrades are as expensive and  
often as possible. If anyone complains about prices, blame renewable energy.


Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
  snipped-for-privacy@altro.com wrote:

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I've found I can get an extra year or two with these:

<https://www.amazon.com/AudioQuest-NRG-10-Power-Cord-6ft/dp/B009RUS1TQ/re
f=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid15%11792000&sr=8-6>

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Monday, November 27, 2017 at 9:16:27 AM UTC-5, Mark Storkamp wrote:
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I dip all my cables in liquid nitrogen before using.  
This traps the electrons forever.  It does cause the plastic  
insulation to crack.  But hey, Duct tape to the rescue.  

George H.    

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 11/27/2017 09:39 AM, George Herold wrote:
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Nah, you have to use helium to trap them really forever.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 11:05:52 -0500, Phil Hobbs

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Just tie a bunch of knots in the cord. Electrons are not very smart
and can't figure out the curves.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 11/27/2017 12:17 PM, John Larkin wrote:
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So you've noticed that too?  Sometimes it's really hard to explain to
them what you want them to do. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:51:13 -0500, Phil Hobbs

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I bet we could get the GEMs (golden-eared morons) to tie knots in
various places in power and speaker cables and then have gigantic
debates over the sonic effects.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing   precision measurement  

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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:51:13 -0500, Phil Hobbs

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You just need to take charge.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing   precision measurement  

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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 09:17:13 -0800, John Larkin

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That may have already been patented.  Searching for effects of knots
on speaker lead inductance:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=speaker+lead+inductance+knots
I find plenty of hits.  

Better yet, CAT5 for speaker leads:
<https://www.venhaus1.com/diycatfivecables.html
   "Quality materials: Although it would be more ideal to  
   use higher purity oxygen-free copper with long grain  
   structure (or better yet OCC copper)..."
OCC =  "Ohno Continuous Cast"
#18 AWG OCC Silver w/Airlok insulation, only $24.99/ft.

This is too much fun... back to work.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Monday, November 27, 2017 at 2:13:11 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Oh no... what type of knot do you use?  
I find the sheepshank works best. :^)

GH.

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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 11:36:22 -0800 (PST), George Herold

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Gordian knot[1].
<https://www.counter-currents.com/2014/04/the-gordian-knot-and-some-race-history/

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My guess(tm) is that some enterprising researcher had already written
a report on the inductance of various knots for an Ig Nobel Prize
entry.  I couldn't find anything, so that area of research is
available for those with too much time on their hands.  However, I did
find some comments on tying knots in power cords allegedly preventing
power surges caused by lightning strikes.
<https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/13978/tying-knots-in-power-cables-to-prevent-power-surge-from-lightning-strikes
<https://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/5833/does-tying-a-knot-in-a-power-cord-provide-any-protection-against-lightning
Sorry, but no comparisons of the effectiveness of different types of
knots.  My guess(tm) is that something that resembles a coil will be
the least disgusting.  If one wants something that actually works,
adding some ferrite cores like this would be better:
<
http://palomar-engineers.com/wp-content/uploads/20131210_114716.jpg


[1]  Way back in college, I instigated the short lived fad of sending
very difficult to open Christmas packages.  Besides the Matryoshka
doll style boxes and packing, the package was tied with a fair
approximation of a Gordian knot.  If we had Tyvex and Kevlar at the
time, I would have used them.  


We return now to what I should be doing.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On 28-11-2017 0:19, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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We should return to what you are doing????????????
No way brother.
Go soak your head.

Re: Replace the cord on all radios, tvs and other electronics every five years.
On Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 10:19:18 AM UTC+11, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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history/>
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Not exactly what you are talking about, but Edward Witten is a particularly
 enterprising researcher in string theory, and I do like the idea of matter
 merely being knots in space-time - regular four-dimensional space-time app
arently won't do, as you seem to need an odd number of dimensions to get kn
ots (or knot-like structures) but since string theory seems to like 11-dime
nsional space, it may eventually work out.

https://www.ias.edu/ideas/2011/witten-knots-quantum-theory

With 10^500 possible universes for it work out in, this isn't a particularl
y bold claim.

<snip>

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

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