Potential room temperature super-conductors?

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http://www.pnas.org/content/114/27/6990.full

This does strike me as on-topic, if a bit of a way away yet.

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Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On 04/07/17 21:56, snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote:
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Is behind PNAS paywall, unfortunately.


Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
wrote:

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"Potential" means that it's probably more press-release science.

<Potential room temperature super-conductors> gets 310,000 hits on
Google.


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John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
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Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
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Interesting that they found new modes of superconductivity, but of course a
 metal hydride that only works in a diamond anvil cell is a fair way off fr
om practical applications. Maybe we should start asking for "room temperatu
re, low pressure, stable, inexpensive superconductors that don't smell too  
bad". ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On Tue, 4 Jul 2017 13:02:08 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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It would certainly improve the Q of 0603 inductors.


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John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
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Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
John Larkin wrote:
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   There might be a way to slightly increase the Q of present 0603  
inductors with some mechanical re-design.
   Basically, put a shield around it; that makes it more resonant around  
some to-be-determined frequency.
   Trade-offs.


Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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   Make sure that the smell of pressreleaseium is counted...

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 6:02:14 AM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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They talk about Bardeen?Cooper?Schrieffer (BCS) superconduc
tivity, which I had thought was plain vanilla (as opposed to what goes on i
n persovskite "high-temperature superconductors". Or are you using "mode" i
n another sense?

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a fair way off from practical applications. Maybe we should start asking fo
r "room temperature, low pressure, stable, inexpensive superconductors that
 don't smell too bad". ;)

Maybe we are going to see some big and funny shaped diamond anvil cells ...
 or some weird way of exploiting carbon nanotubes, with a thread of LaH10 d
own the core of the tube.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On 7/4/2017 1:01 PM, John Larkin wrote:
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  I think that means it's 10 years before the 10 years before it has  
practical application.
                       Mikek

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?

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Isn't that about when CNF (or any NF, for that matter) will be
practical?


Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On 05.07.2017 03:10, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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CNF as in "Cold Nuclear Fusion"? Interestingly enough, that also seems
to use heavily loaded (lots of H per metal quantity) metal hydrides at
almost metal-lattice-breaking pressures.


Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On Sat, 08 Jul 2017 23:33:00 +0200, Dimitrij Klingbeil

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Yes, CNF == Cold Nuclear Fusion.  Seems as you've found the source of
the mysterious energy.  ;-)

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 12:56:23 AM UTC+2, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:
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Superconductivity doesn't generate energy - it's all about the mysterious (
for krw) absence of energy-absorbing electrical resistance.

Cold nuclear fusion did involve squeezing lots of deuterium into a palladiu
m lattice, but the the yitrium and lanthenum hydrides being talked about ar
e actually chemical compounds, with metal-hydrogen bonds (albeit pretty wea
k bonds in YH10 and LaH10) so it is chemically rather different.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 4:01:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
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So what?

It's definitely press-release science. It's reporting the results of computer simulations, which are promising enough that there will be a few experimentalists out there making lanthenum and yittrium hydrides (LaH10 and YH10).

It wasn't behind a paytwall for me - I've got a copy of the full 395kB html file, and could e-mail it to anybody who asked for it, if the web-police don't get to me first.

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Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Potential room temperature super-conductors?
On 05/07/2017 16:30, snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote:
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The abstract is available
http://www.pnas.org/content/114/27/6990.abstract

But for everyone else the PNAS paywall is asking $10.
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Whilst it might be a room temperature super-conductor at such a high  
pressure in a diamond anvil it's a very long way from NTP
  210GPa = 2.1 MegaBar - subject to mental arithmetic errors

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Regards,
Martin Brown

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