OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?

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OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--  
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
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Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Mon, 05 Feb 2018 13:49:58 -0700, Jim Thompson

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Why?  You can compress them to the print DPI.
Otherwise I would suggest the monitor resolution or at least half
that.
The other night I scanned in an old user manual with a tiny schematic.
Scanner was set to 600dpi, the Component values were readable. 400 dpi
coulld have worked too.

Cheers

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Mon, 05 Feb 2018 16:07:30 -0500, Martin Riddle

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File format?  From other apps I can print out to various file formats.
What file format best imports into a Word document?
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--  
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
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Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Mon, 05 Feb 2018 14:30:22 -0700, Jim Thompson

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jpg, png or bmp, I never had much luck with other formats.
Wish there was better support for pdf. EMF or WEMF sometimes works
well.

Cheers

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 05/02/2018 21:30, Jim Thompson wrote:
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Define what you mean by "best". Quality vs size is always a trade off.

For line art PNG in as few colours as is needed is about the best and  
for photographs JPG at a quality you find acceptable. Choose unwisely  
and you will end up with a much larger file with no gain in quality.

I assume here that you do mean to truly import them rather than drag and  
drop them into a document where insane sizes can accumulate as orphaned  
metadata. It is particularly bad in standard reports where images get  
dragged and dropped onto the same locations.

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
Martin Brown wrote:

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  Most document authoring tools re-compress the pic to fit the page you
are pasting it into.  Or the user rezises on the fly as he places it.


Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 05/02/2018 23:57, Long Hair wrote:
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Word doesn't do a good job on either of those. If you care about quality  
and size in the final document it is as well to match the image  
dimensions to the size it will display in Word at 100% zoom (+/-20%).

Word can be exceptionally bad if you paste large images into documents  
regularly by drag and drop. Regular inspection reports go haywire after  
a few months getting bigger and bigger every time they are updated.

I have seen 200MB corporate documents with less than 10MB of actual real  
data in them. The rest were previous images of one sort or another in  
the most awful BMP style orphaned metadata form. It used to be possible  
to automagically strip them by a VBA script but Mickeysoft broke it.

If you have an unreasonably sized document and want to see what utter  
dross is hiding inside it export to HTML will give you a rough idea.

These days I recommend people with insane sized Word documents for  
archive export them to PDF first since that effectively kills the dross.  
It isn't really possible to sort a Word document that has gone haywire  
(apart from possibly opening and saving it in a Word compatible clone).

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 06/02/18 08:53, Martin Brown wrote:
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These usually don't last long in Word.  Sooner or later, Word corrupts
the document making it unusable (and helpfully copies the corruption
when you think you can start a new document and copy-and-paste the old
contents).

If you want professional, reliable word processing (and don't like
LaTeX), LibreOffice is far, far better.  You can open that 200 MB word
document in LibreOffice, re-save it (as doc or docx if you want), and
you'll get the 10 MB real file.

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Word creates the crappiest, most bloated mess for HTML that you will
ever see.  It is even worse than the xml stuff it saves natively (which
you can see by renaming your .docx file as .zip, and unpacking it).

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Or use LibreOffice and generate PDF files directly - with greater
efficiency, better rendering and more functionality than you get trying
to extract them from Word.

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Indeed (except that LibreOffice isn't a Word clone - it is a massive
improvement).



Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 06/02/2018 09:50, David Brown wrote:
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Problem is that in a corporate environment the drones don't get a choice  
about which software they install or what bloatware they have to use for  
their intranet. I know a lot of pain and suffering caused by a recent  
supposedly "transparent" migration that broke loads of things.

If you keep your Word documents under 100MB they seldom implode.
Above 250MB and implosion is almost inevitable.

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I have a script that takes Words "filtered" HTML and turns it into  
something small concise and more or less oven ready for a proper HTML  
editor to make into a web page. I used to have a similar script for  
repairing Word documents but it stopped working in later versions.

(the script still ran but no longer had the beneficial effect)

Images have to be in a table for things to stay remotely right.

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I love MS Office's - What you see is never quite what you get feature so  
that documents invariably depend on font metrics of the output device.

My favourite is that circles in Excel are rescaled in aspect ratio  
according to the kerning of the font you happen to use for default text!

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Corporate drones don't have that choice.
(or indeed any choice about what software is installed on their PC)

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 06/02/18 11:05, Martin Brown wrote:
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Absolutely true, at least in most cases.  I work in a corporate
environment, but not a huge one - and we don't have drones.  People are
allowed to say "I think /this/ program might be better".  In the
development department, people are /expected/ to use the best tools
conveniently available - possibly asking IT for advice.  Of course, it
helps that the IT manager is flexible, an open source fan, and so lazy
that he much prefers people to be responsible for their own machines
when possible.  He is tyrannical about not allowing the use of Internet
Exploder, hates Windows servers, and is dismissive about fruit machines,
but is otherwise quite open to new ideas.  LibreOffice is the standard
office suite, with MS Office for those that have particular reason to
buy it.  The last time I had a version of MS Word on my computer was
Word for Windows 2.0 over 20 years ago.

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Experience varies - if you mix versions of Word or have other
complications, you get problems with documents that are smaller than that.

I did see an Excel sheet on our servers that was nearly 500 MB long.
There wasn't much in it - opening and re-saving with LibreOffice brought
it well under 1 MB.  It had just collected changes, useless metadata,
and other junk for many years, from many systems.

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That is an odd use of the word "love" :-)

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Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 02/05/2018 04:07 PM, Martin Riddle wrote:
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A photo taken with a modern high-megapixel cell phone camera using an  
app like PhotoScan that uses "oversampling" will probably do better job  
in 2018 than the occasionally-used 10 year old HP print/scan/fax boxes  
most people have sitting around

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Mon, 05 Feb 2018 13:49:58 -0700, Jim Thompson

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Jpeg seems to work fine for photos. I use Visio .EMF files for line
work, like block diagrams. TIFFs are OK for diagrams too.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Monday, February 5, 2018 at 3:50:10 PM UTC-5, Jim Thompson wrote:
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I've always had good luck with JPG's.
The problem with Word is... the files get too big and tend to blow up.

Conventional wisdom is 150 dpi for very legible text, and 300 dpi for photo images.  Screen resolution can hover around 96 dpi.

Beyond that advice, higher resolutions really only make sense in very specialized situations... for which one probably wouldn't choose Word in the first place!

Not to insult your intelligence, but I want to make sure you know the "trick" to working with images in Word:

Never (Never!!) use the page itself as the image container.

Instead, use a textbox or table cell (with borders turned off, if so desired).
The image will generally be much better behaved, and with a textbox, you can re-arrange the image as needed (usually) without Windows blowing up.

I've had Word documents into the 150MB range with images.
But use the page as an image container, it's often hard to get past about 25 before things get ugly.

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
wrote:

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Why not? I just drag/drop images into Word, and use the format option
to resize them to look right. That works fine.

Of course, I don't import 20 megabyte images.

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--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Monday, February 5, 2018 at 11:14:38 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
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If you work with Word long enough, you'll come to see that big documents te
nd to blow-up.  Often spectacularly.  It is my least favorite Microsoft Off
ice product (well, maybe Visio), and it's the one that has (by far) the lar
gest object model (programming).  There are a lot of things that can, and o
ften do, go wrong, and embedded image files is right up there near the top  
of "usual suspects".

The image(s) don't need to be large by themselves.   Just the document.

But to your question, one benefit of using an image "container" is that you
 can more easily wrap text around it -- something that is quite a bit more  
cumbersome to do when both the page and the text are on the same page (cont
ainer).  Try it sometime and see if you don't agree!  :)

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 06/02/2018 05:28, mpm wrote:
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Actually it is regular use of drag and drop onto existing images that  
makes it blow up. I used to have a VBA script to undo the damage that  
worked well until they launched Office 2007 when they managed to destroy  
the mechanism that I used to purge Word of its inner tapeworms.

Working on corporate documents with multiple versions of Word also  
causes orphaned metadata to build up faster than normal. Documents that  
originated in a previous version being particularly prone to it.
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You can do it if you set the appropriate properties for the image.

The only thing is if you intend to export to HTML at some stage then it  
is much more likely to look approximately like what you intended if you  
put the images into a table. Word export to HTML is dire!

Although it is better than Powerpoint in this respect (which can't).

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Tuesday, February 6, 2018 at 2:55:26 AM UTC-5, Martin Brown wrote:
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No argument there!  :)
Personally, I rarely use drag-and-drop capabilities, in Word or elsewhere.
(Only in cases where a web page forces it, really.)

But I don't doubt that drag-&-drop contributes to Word imploding.

Essentially, I think what you might be describing is inadvertently placing  
one image atop another in Word.  (bad idea, of course).  I can see where th
is might be easy to do with drag-and-drop.  You get two images (one on top  
of the other) - not a replaced image.  Now, modify the boundaries or proper
ties of one of those images and you've got a juicy recipe for disaster.  Ka
-boom.  Bye-bye document.  Nice knowing you.  (Occurring unpredictably, of  
course!)

I'm in the habit of REPLACING images, which generally seems to work better.
I suspect it does so simply be reducing the total accumulated amount of blo
at, generally.  But to your point, you can't count on more than about one p
erson (namely YOU) to follow any procedures or workarounds when updating so
mething like field inspection reports, etc...  Unless you script it, (which
 itself presents several difficulties, even rolling it out), the fact that  
Word is a desktop application means you ultimately have no control over wha
t end-users do.  (i.e., Word bloat, crash, etc..)

BTW: You can automate helping Word to implode.
Check out a (fairly expensive, but totally indispensable) plug-in called "A
utoTag" by Winward.  :)

https://wiki.windward.net/Returning_Users/AutoTag

Wonderful tool, but it can create some truly huge Word documents (when the  
job at hand so requires).  Otherwise, forget Word and find something else.

Again BTW, re: AutoTag
Great tool, highly recommended.  A bit cumbersome to use until you get the  
hang of it.  If you need to automate Word (or Office) documents to pull dat
a from multiple sources, slice-&-dice, and then prepare reports (templates)
, this is the tool for that -- and Word seems to like it in that it rarely  
blows up, even with really big files.  (They don't pay me to say that.)

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On 06/02/2018 04:14, John Larkin wrote:
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Actually no it doesn't - it works fine the first time round only. If you  
drag and drop an image onto an existing image position both will get to  
survive internally and the file will grow bigger every time you do it.

It is an annoying problem with regularly updated documents like site  
inspection reports which after a while can end up many 100MB in size  
with at most 20MB of actual useful data inside them.
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Unfortunately a lot of people do direct from a camera/smartphone and  
Word doesn't handle resizing to match the document requirements well.

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Tue, 6 Feb 2018 07:54:38 +0000, Martin Brown

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I have an ongoing design notes doc, almost the diary of a design, that
is 80 pages by now, with about one pic per page. The Word file is 6.4
Mbytes, which is microscopic in these days of terabyte drives. I
haven't seen the problems people are referring to.

I don't use cell phone pics! I have real cameras. My typical jpeg file
averages maybe 150 Kbyte after tweaking. Unless you have a serious
setup, good lighting and a rigid tripod, multi-megabyte image files
are silly. It's appalling, the megabyte blurry pics that my customers
send me.

I am sort of the company photographer. I tweak and trim pics in
Irfanview before we use them for anything else.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: OT: Best Resolution Image File to Import into Word?
On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 08:17:14 -0800, John Larkin

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I opened the doc and deleted around half of the pics, and saved that.
The file size dropped about in half. Word does not seem to hang onto
the deleted pics.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


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