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Re: Monkey Brains

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Bell also experimented with light in a pipe, focussed by temperature
gradients.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On 2018-08-20 15:26, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
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Not when you make the cell size smaller and smaller. Of course,  
eventually you have to deal with connecting all those little  
transceivers but one can pick the locations to make that easiest versus  
having to trench up a busy street in a large bustling city. In America  
that would often be on the telco poles.


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That sounds easy but only until you show up at city hall trying to get a  
permit for it. And the permission from law enforcement to block the  
street. And a deal with the local union guys. And a noise abatement  
exemption. And an (expensive) attorney to fend off eventual  
environmental impact complaints and business losses because people can't  
park in front of Chez Frou-Frou for the day.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Monkey Brains
On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 15:51:47 UTC+1, Joerg  wrote:
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isn't there a limit to how small the cells can go?

Re: Monkey Brains
tirsdag den 21. august 2018 kl. 17.03.50 UTC+2 skrev snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com:
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-field_communication ;)

Re: Monkey Brains
On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 16:32:51 UTC+1, Lasse Langwadt Christensen  wrote:
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I don't believe that an electronic device every 4cm all around us is workable physically or financially. It might one day carry a bit of the wanted data, but much it can't. The hard limit is physical, the practical limit any year soon is financial.


NT

Re: Monkey Brains
On Tue, 21 Aug 2018 15:40:13 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Imagine sticking a tiny little thing to most everything you own, and
always being able to find it.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing   precision measurement  

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Re: Monkey Brains
On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 23:45:14 UTC+1, John Larkin  wrote:
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rote:
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rnet
=1
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=1
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ssic
hing*
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ersus  
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rica  
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kable physically or financially. It might one day carry a bit of the wanted
 data, but much it can't. The hard limit is physical, the practical limit a
ny year soon is financial.
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To act as a data hub it would only work on every thing I own with power. Ho
w many are powered at once? Dunno, could be over 100 indoors, not many outd
oors. That's a hard limit. That limit won't bother us now, but soon it will
. 300 baud didn't bother me at first.


NT

Re: Monkey Brains
On 22/08/2018 8:45 AM, John Larkin wrote:

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I'd lose the searching device - how would I find that?

Sylvia.

Re: Monkey Brains
On Wed, 22 Aug 2018 13:00:19 +1000, Sylvia Else

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Cell phone. Or an implant, so we could also find you.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On 22/08/2018 1:18 PM, John Larkin wrote:
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The latter might be a good idea in a few years.

Sylvia.

Re: Monkey Brains
On 08/21/2018 11:00 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
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Attaching a little something to everything I own, so Google could make  
sure I brush my teeth for 5 minutes every time.  Comforting.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

(Who isn't going to have any stinking IoT in his house till the good old  
stuff disappears off eBay)

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Monkey Brains
On Wed, 22 Aug 2018 18:56:32 -0400, Phil Hobbs

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Our new energy-efficient lighting system at work is infuriating. The
switches are complex and erratic, motion-sensor lights go off when
they feel like it, lights go on when you walk into a room whether you
want them or not. I figured I'd replace a smart switch with a dumb one
so pulled off the cover plate. The switch has an RJ45 and CAT5 up the
conduit. So I'll have to pull AC wires, too.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

lunatic fringe electronics  


Re: Monkey Brains
On Tue, 21 Aug 2018 08:03:43 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Not really.  The common home nanocellular range extender will provide
cellular coverage over a 50ft radius.
<https://www.verizonwireless.com/accessories/samsung-4g-lte-network-extender-2/
If you want VZW coverge indoors, just plug one of these into an
internet connection, and your smartphone now works.  It's literally a
small LTE cell site in a box.

Small Cell":
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_cell
<https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=small+cell+installation+photos

Femtocell repeaters:
<https://www.thinksmallcell.com/System/how-femtocells-work.html

The only real limiation on how small a cell can be made is financial,
which is mostly in the cost of the backhaul.   At the limited range of
these devices, mutual interference is a minor problem.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Monkey Brains
On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 17:10:25 UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann  wrote:
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Even if it only covered 5' it's still a hard physical limit. I know it's hard to imagine wanting massive data throughput, but we've all lived through enough previous decades to know how that goes.


NT

Re: Monkey Brains
On 2018-08-21 08:03, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Not really. Especially if like in the case of John's company a very  
narrow RF beam is used.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Monkey Brains
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An interesting property of the 60 GHz wavelength is that it is  
absorbed by the oxygen in the atmosphere, so even when you put the
antennas at high locations the signal will not get further than
about a mile.
Combined with the narrow beamwidth of the antennas, this means that
the frequency can be re-used many times (so indeed, small cells).

Re: Monkey Brains
On 2018-08-22 12:49, Rob wrote:
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Yes, the opportunities are almost endless. That is one reason why I  
chose RF and analog as a career.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Monkey Brains
On Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at 12:51:47 AM UTC+10, Joerg wrote:
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Once you've got one fibre laid, laying another is just blowing a new one down the existing pipe.

Australia's broad-band network initiative was designed to set up that infra-structure.

Granting that Australia's rural population density is very low, the remote outback gets served by satellite links (and that isn't happening all that fast) but the rest of the country (where most of the people actually live) isn't too bad.

I'm stuck with fibre to the building, but the building was designed with a telecommunications shaft, which accommodates all sort of links, including old cable TV coax.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Monkey Brains
On 2018-08-21 16:29, snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote:
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The problem is laying the first one. In older cities and towns the  
infrastructure consists of copper and it's all just buried, no pipes.  
Same where we live. Running a fiber to our house would require  
excavating on a steep slope while tearing up our landscaping and that of  
a neighbor. Also, you can't even get a little Kubota trencher in there  
safely. Not gonna happen.


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Satellite is slow, there you really have a hard total bandwidth limit.  
It's also expensive. In areas where the proper in- or above-ground  
infrastructure isn't in place RF is IMO the best solution. Also the  
least expensive one.


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No ten horses would drag me or my wife to live in a city ever again.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Monkey Brains
On 23/08/18 15:47, Joerg wrote:
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Famously in London the first fibre optic cables were pretty easy
to lay. The telcos bought up the unused assets of the London
Hydraulic Power Company.

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