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Re: HD speed up times
On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 10:42:46 -0700 TheQuickBrownFox

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According To Wiki 3.75MB.

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AlwayWrong again. What a wealth of disinformation you are.

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As usual, nothing at all useful in QuickBrownLoaf's post.

Re: HD speed up times

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Some of the more common DEC 14" platter drives were the RK05 with 2.5
MB capacity and the RL01 with 5 MB capacity.


Re: HD speed up times

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Around 1983 when cp/m machines were still useful and as fast as IBM-PC,
a local company that made cp/m semi-portable was in liquidation, one of
the items on sale was a hard drive, all of 5MB capacity, for several
thousand dollars.  At the time I could fit a bit over 1MB onto a quad
density 8" floppy disk, couldn't see any point to such a small hard drive
capacity.

In October'84 got a shiny new PC-AT to work with, 21MB hard drive as
standard, on a '286 processor.  They were the ones included dirt from
the factory next door.  Failed fairly often, but was years before we got
to know the reason.  Hard drive was a little more convenient then big
floppies, but the cp/m box was kept in use for another year, connected
via serial cable to the IBM box for backups and files transfers.  


There were a few products that suffered lack of clean room build
environments back then, anyone remember the Beckman displays?  They
developed spots of burnt, corroded areas inside, also due to the
factory next door's particulates.  Took them a while to work it out,
Beckman displays were large neon seven segment digits, before LEDs
took over, used in industrial instrumentation displays, PID  
controllers.

Grant.

Re: HD speed up times

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  We had a lot of early Seagate 21MB and up HDs that failed often, and we
fixed them.  The little flap that grounds the spindle shaft (and
platters) to ground would get oxidized and the drive would fail.

  Once we began burnishing that spot, and ensuring that the 'flap
pressure' was good, the drives never failed again.  I still have a
couple.

Re: HD speed up times
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Don't remind me!  On similar drives we used to have to glue inner tube
rubber to the back of the phosphor bronze spring that pushed the carbon
grounding brush onto the spindle end to stop it resonating and squealing
at something like the spindle speed.

--
Ian Malcolm.   London, ENGLAND.  (NEWSGROUP REPLY PREFERRED)
ianm[at]the[dash]malcolms[dot]freeserve[dot]co[dot]uk
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Re: HD speed up times

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  Oh boy. JW asswipe knows how to google search!  WOW!
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  You're an idiot.  We are not talking about mainframe horseshit here,
boy.  We are talking about commercial products.  The Seagate was the
first.

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  As usual, you have posted NOTHING contributory.

  If you dispute something I wrote, asswipe, then CITE the contention,
don't just spew horseshit, like the little bitch we all know you are.

Re: HD speed up times
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Easy, DimBulb, try not to be so awed. If you ask politely, someone may
offer to teach you how to do a Google search.

Re: HD speed up times

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  If we want retarded, peanut gallery baby horseshit, we'll call you,
fuckhead John.  Otherwise FOAD!

Re: HD speed up times
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Awwww. You messed up the context. Now it resembles your brain. I'll past
it back in....

 >>> Oh boy. JW asswipe knows how to google search!  WOW!

 >> Easy, DimBulb, try not to be so awed. If you ask politely, someone
 >> may offer to teach you how to do a Google search.

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I will if you will. You go first.

Re: HD speed up times

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I dunno. He's pretty much burned all his bridges. I suppose he could morph
again. That might help.

Re: HD speed up times
On Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:00:56 -0700 TheQuickBrownFox

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Look! A shiny nickel!

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Your statement:
"Even the first 1GB drive was a 5.25", full height SCSI Seagate."

I don't see anything there about not including mainframe disk drives.

You Dumb Ass.

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You're always wrong. I know. Brother, do I know!

Re: HD speed up times

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Well, I'd personally call that N separate arms and N heads, ganged
together into a single actuator mechanism... there's only one head per
surface.

The head assemblies themselves have become quite impressively
sophisticated.  I'm told that these days, there's actually a small
thermal-flex "heater" in the head assembly, which heats up and cools
down and creates a bending force which flexes the head itself towards
or away from the platter surface.  The "flying height" of the head is
thus being adjusted dynamically, in real time, in order to keep it at
the correct height (and I think the optimal height during writing is
different than the height during reading).

That's one of the limitations on trying to run more than one head per
surface.  It's just the head itself - it's the cost and the power
requirement for the electronics which drive the head (vertical and
horizontal tracking, read conditioning, write-current drive, etc.).

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Real Soon Now, I expect.

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Yup.  The sectors-per-track will vary, between "identical drives", and
between heads/surfaces and across individual surfaces in any specific
drive, depending on the quality of the individual head and the quality
of the surface.

The days are long gone when the host controller and software had any
really good understanding of the drive geometry.  These days, you can
either use the "logical block address" (as SCSI drives did from the
get-go), or you can try to use some CHS (cylinder/head/sector) legacy
addressing notation which actually bears no meaningful relationship to
the drive's internal storage geometry.  The drive controller is
managing it all "out of sight" of the host I/O system.

--
Friends of Jade Warrior home page:  http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
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Re: HD speed up times
On Mon, 4 Apr 2011 18:44:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@radagast.org (Dave Platt)

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  "The drive controller" on an IDE drive is ON THE DRIVE.

  The "host I/O system" is ONLY an I/O system, NOT the drive controller.
  On IDE.

Re: HD speed up times

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I'm not at all certain, but I believe that radial expansion of the
platters due to temperature changes would result in loss of head/track
alignment which couldn't be servoed out.

Re: HD speed up times

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There were fixed-head disks in use ca 1960, but yes, alignment issues
would (and did) limit track density.

John


Re: HD speed up times


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This was the original problem by seagate(or whatever company that originally
did it before seagate got them). If the platters expand that much and it
cannot be correspondingly compensated for by the expanding arm(as it too
will expand in a similar manner so that everything relatively should be the
same) then you might be right.

That is, suppose the radial expansion is non-zero. The distance between the
RW heads would then not be the same before and after which would result in
mis-alligned tracks. If the inter-head distance is fixed it could not be
compensated for.

The only way to deal with it would be to reduce the effects of temperature
or to allow variable distance between heads(might not be that difficult).

In any case I saw site about a rectangular disk that had an arrya of RW
heads that moved slightly relative to the media. I guess this would be much
more effective as it eliminates the any real motion(small vibrational motion
is all that is needed). Ofcourse unlikely it will come out on the market but
it's nice to know someone tried to improve upon the idea.

Now that I think about it, HD companies have an incentive to make sure such
technologies don't make it as they have billions invested in the
manufacturing of their crap.


 


Re: HD speed up times

snipped other stupid shit.
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  Any more stupid little gems?  Hard drive technology is at its peak,
and likely because they didn't hire any idiots like you.

Re: HD speed up times

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The same old trajectory:


Amateur does no research but has idea to revolutionize a
billion-dollar industry.

Blames conspiracy theory for lack of admiration.

Calls sophisticated and brilliant products "crap"


Are you the same guy that invented the 200 MPG carburetor?

John


Re: HD speed up times

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   Seagate was originally called Shugart Associates. They were sued by
Shugart and forced to change their name, so they are still the same
company.  Any other idiotic comments you'd like to make?


--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a Band-Aidô on it, because it's
Teflon coated.

Re: HD speed up times

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  Why don't YOU grow the fuck up BEFORE you make another post?

  Don't worry, dumbfuck.  We know better than to think that you would
leave and not return until you get a clue.

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