Ferrite rod, side by side or in line - Page 2

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Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 12:49:02 AM UTC+11, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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Never came across any myself.

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Small, thin markets tend to take a while to sort out standardised modules.

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Geiger counters verge on a mass market item. Military specs tend to be written to exclude using mass market components - it's pork barrel politics in action

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Until the economic advantage of exploiting a common form factor trumps customer wilfulness.

Electron microscopes include a high voltage power supply that typically gets cranked up to 30kV to drive the electron beam. As far as I can remember, we bought them in, along with the 1kV supplies for the photomultiplier tube in the electron detector.

There was clearly an off-the-shelf market for the high-voltage connectors that hooked them up.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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There is no such thing as a "standardized module" in HV power supplies, you  
dope.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 10:47:41 PM UTC+11, DecadentLinux...@decade
nce.org wrote:
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ou  
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Photomutiplier power supply modules looked pretty much standardised to me.

I don't think that anybody had formulated an industry standard, but there w
ere enough of them around that looked much the same to suggest that the pro
cess of trying to poach other peoples customers with drop-in replacements h
ad gotten most of the way there by a less formal route.

You look rather more like the dope here, but you have a bit too high an opi
nion of your won expertise to realise quite how silly your pretensions look
.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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Not even those.  You can buy one, but I can guarantee that it is not as  
good as those we made for the F-4 Phantom program.  Our dividers are the  
most leak free units available.

  And they are not standardized.  The physical form factor is but the  
internals vary due to differences in PMTs.

  And you looking at something and assuming that man has created or adopted  
a standard based on your pathetic observation is laughable.

  You can't even rasp a 555 timer...   and never will.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 1:34:26 AM UTC+11, DecadentLinux...@decad
ence.org wrote:
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And you charged the US Navy much more for them than they would have paid fo
r inferior units that would have worked just as well. Pork-barrel economics
  
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Different photomultiplier tubes can use different voltages. The main variat
ion in photomultipliers is in the structure and number of the dynodes - box
 and grid, venetian blind and fast-focussed, with some fast focussed tubes  
getting up to 14 dynodes - but in general the supply delivers a single high
 voltage outlet and the divider chain manages the voltages applied to the d
ynodes.
  
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ed  
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Your ignorance is laughable, and you have too little appreciation of how li
ttle you know.  
  
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I put one together once. The - slightly crazy - requirement was to find a s
emiconductor-based timer that would be as stable as something crystal based
 - and the 555 wasn't remotely in the hunt. It did leave me well-informed a
bout the deficiencies of the 555. Didn't stop me looking at the part from t
ime to time in  
1980's but it never came up to snuff, and after that there were plenty of b
etter options.

I've got Hans Camenzind's book, which does spend a chapter on the 555, whic
h was hugely successful when first introduced (but mainly because it had be
en squeezed into an 8-pin package) but didn't age well.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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  No.  the main variation is the leakage in the dynode, you stupid fuck.

  Ours was less than 3 picofarads per element.  We spent well over a year  
finding a socket that did not leak and no other makers are using it.

  In this realm, coffee breath can cause a failure.  Our devices were as  
clean as it gets and our design is superior.  That is why Japan puts OUR  
supplies in their F-4s.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 3:33:58 PM UTC+11, DecadentLinux...@decad
ence.org wrote:
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Dynodes don't "leak". They do draw current, because the "multiplication" pr
ocess at each dynode means that more electrons leave the dynode than hit it
.

There are a couple of different dynode coatings but pretty much all of them
 behave much the same way. RCA did have a GaP coating for the first dynode  
in their 8850 tube which had a very high secondary electron yield - 35 to 4
0 - but it was unique, very expensive and not copied.  

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That's capacitance, not any kind of "leakage".

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EMI sold a PTFE based socket that didn't leak. Pity you didn't find it. If  
it took you a year to find something that didn't leak, you can't have searc
hed all that expertly.
  
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Seems improbable. Keeping high-voltage gear clean and non-leaking is a prob
lem, but we bought pins in PTFE plugs (from element 14/Newark) that we coul
d drop into drilled holes in printed circuit board and let them do the heav
y lifting.

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Perhaps. Keeping the logistics simple is a more likely explanation.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in news:706af1d3-292d-404c-ac7a-fec2f11ef376
@googlegroups.com:

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  No, dumbfuck, but the power supplies that feed them do, and that is what  
causes poor performance.

  You have no clue how they are constructed.

  Ours have the lowest leakage in the industry.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 6:05:26 PM UTC+11, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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The gain of a photomulitplier is proportional to something like the eighth power of the supply voltage, so photomultiplier power supplies have to be well filtered to keep any ripple on the output away from the tube itself. It's not rocket science.  

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You couldn't be more wrong.

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Whatever you mean by leakage. When you talk about 3pF of "leakage" you make it obvious that you don't know what you are talking about.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in news:706af1d3-292d-404c-ac7a-fec2f11ef376
@googlegroups.com:

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picoamps.

  Your brain leaked out decades ago.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 6:06:04 PM UTC+11, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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It's beginning to look as if you never had one.

The current down a dynode chain tends to be set to be somewhere between 10uA and and 100uA. A couple of picoamps of leakage isn't going to matter.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

  

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in news:706af1d3-292d-404c-ac7a-fec2f11ef376
@googlegroups.com:

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  Sorry, chump, but it does leak.  You simply do not know what takes place.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 6:07:02 PM UTC+11, DecadentLinux...@decad
ence.org wrote:
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e.

It doesn't leak enough to matter. You do seem to think that a couple of pic
oamps of leakage could be important (though you didn't know enough to speci
fy the voltages required to drive that much leakage) which does suggest tha
t you haven't got a clue on the subject.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in news:706af1d3-292d-404c-ac7a-fec2f11ef376
@googlegroups.com:

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  No perhaps about you being a stupid bastard.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 6:08:27 PM UTC+11, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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In your opinion, which doesn't seem to be worth worrying about.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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  You know nothing about HVPS.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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  That is a stupid remark.


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  And you are a total retard.

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  You're an idiot who knows nothing about the world.

  NONE of the units are a commercial product and none are in the private  
sector. Every component was COTM.  The end product the supplies went  
into are NOT a commercial product either.

  Your grasp of the current world process hovers at nil.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 10:52:26 PM UTC+11, DecadentLinux...@decade
nce.org wrote:
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And your evidence for that claim is? Survivalists love them.
  
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You'd like to think so, but I was security cleared for military work in my  
first job in Australia, and it had to be renewed when I worked for EMI Cent
ral Research in the UK from 1976 to 1979 - I wasn't doing any military stuf
f there myself, but my colleagues were. Military boondoggles did get discus
sed.
  
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Of course not. The supplier can charge a lot more that way, and the militar
y can be sold a bill of goods about extended temperature ranges and tougher
 environmental conditions.

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Dream on. You seem to swallow self-serving propaganda as enthusiastically a
s Cursitor Doom. John Larkin lapping up denialist propaganda is our current
 standard for utter gullibility, but you do seem to be trying to compete.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney


Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
snipped-for-privacy@ieee.org wrote in

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  Right now, your clearance is ZERO and your capacity to get one again  
would be low to zero in my book simply by the way you spout off about it  
here.  You are a risk, Chucko.

Re: Ferrite rod, side by side or in line
On Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 1:42:58 AM UTC+11, snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:
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You have to be rather more political than I am to qualify as a risk.

The real problem for the security services would be establishing where I'd been and what I'd been doing for the last fifty years - 22 years in the UK and and 19 years in the Netherlands would make that task tedious and complicated.

It's not that I moved around much, but the international aspect takes time.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

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