AI-generated technical documentation

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Input: "The voltage on transistor Q1 emitter should read 3.5 volts"

Output:

"The voltage on transistor Q1 emitter should read 3.5 volts. Set voltage  
of transistor Q1 to 2.5 volts. With the voltage from transistor Q1 set  
to 1.5 volts, pull transistor Q1 clockwise until power is pulled low, or  
transistor is out of circuit. Pull transistor Q1 clockwise to reset  
voltage and pull power back up. With the voltage from transistor Q1 set  
to 2.5 volts, pull transistor Q1 counterclockwise until power is pulled  
low, or transistor is out of circuit.


Replace your jumper in the circuit by one labeled with 1V. Then replace  
it in the main power circuit and power up your microcontroller.


Note: Be sure the LED is on until your controller has finished powering  
up. The blinking lights should not be in a bad or high state. If it is,  
you are in the final stage of the firmware release.


Note 2: This will only work with microcontroller A0412C-9BK. If you are  
using any other version of A0412C-9BK, you will need to take out the  
resistor."

<https://talktotransformer.com/

Here's an AI-generated missive about the COBOL programming language:

<
http://i.imgur.com/q74kwRi.png


Re: AI-generated technical documentation
On 5/14/19 11:22 PM, bitrex wrote:
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In a decade or so there will probably be AI phishing call bots that call  
you up and sound just like your son, sister, father, wife, whatever and  
try to chat with you for a while before seeing if they can get some  
useful data from you

Re: AI-generated technical documentation
On Wednesday, 15 May 2019 04:31:29 UTC+1, bitrex  wrote:
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There's already one from 1966 that could pretend to be your spychiatrist. Ooh, an appropriate typo. Eliza, and therapist not psych. Convincing for a short while, but soon loses the plot. Nevertheless it convinced many that it was human.


NT

Re: AI-generated technical documentation
On Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at 2:27:31 PM UTC+10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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 Ooh, an appropriate typo. Eliza, and therapist not psych. Convincing for a
 short while, but soon loses the plot. Nevertheless it convinced many that  
it was human.

Parry was another.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PARRY

Eliza modeled a Rogerian phsychotherapist, Parry modeled a paranoid patient
.

Parry had the easier job.

Some program in Texas spent years on getting enough real-world knowledge in
to a conversational data-base to let it sound more or less human. It seems  
to have been shut down before it had enough - as they got closer "enough" k
ept on growing faster than they could get money to keep feeding it.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Re: AI-generated technical documentation
On 5/15/19 1:16 AM, Bill Sloman wrote:
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This one's trained neural network can perhaps unsurprisingly  
automatically generate grammatically and semantically correct, entirely  
novel, anti-Semitic conspiracy theory essays simply from the input text  
prompt "The jews"

<https://imgur.com/a/LH82zKj

Re: AI-generated technical documentation
On a sunny day (Tue, 14 May 2019 21:27:27 -0700 (PDT)) it happened
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

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Oh yes, I have it on some PC.
Uh, this PC

There is also
 tempest_for_eliza-1.0.5
on this PC, a totally different thing,

quote from the README:

<start quote>
 What is it ?
------------

Tempest for Eliza is a Program that uses your computer monitor
to send out AM radio signals. You can then hear computer  
generated music in your radio.

this document first describes tempest for eliza, the old program that
plays music like your cellphone does when you get a phonecall. then it
describes tempest for mp3 which you can use to play mp3 files :-)

How does this work ?
--------------------

All electronic devices send out eletromagnetic waves.
so does your monitor. and your monitor does it all the time.
and at very high frequencies. high enough for your short wave
AM radio.
all you have to do is display the "correct" image on your screen
and your monitor will emit the "right" signals.
Tempest for Eliza displays pictures on your screen. one for
each note in the song.

[Note: Markus G. Kuhn's and Ross J. Anderson's paper; "Soft Tempest:
Hidden Data Transmission Using Electromagnetic Emanations" was used as a
reference when programming Tempest-AM. This paper is a must read before  
going further testing Tempest-AM. The paper is availabe from
   http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ih98-tempest.pdf
I strongly recommend to read the paper thoroughly.]

<end quote>

You can probably google for
 tempest_for_eliza-1.0.5.tar.gz
(a Linux program)
my download is dated 2007...


Re: AI-generated technical documentation
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

<snip>

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After Eliza starts her back talk sometimes the human side of the
conversation devolves into simple minded cussing. At that point losing  
the plot becomes superfluous.
    Back in the day pranksters used to run chatbots on usenet. The perl  
source is at https://www.cpan.org/modules/by-module/Chatbot/

Thank you, 73,

--  
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
There was a young lady named Bright Whose speed was far faster than light;
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