Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits? - Page 2

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

Quoted text here. Click to load it


    Safety.  Do you want to be in the dark, when the outlets in a room
fail?


--
http://improve-usenet.org/index.html

aioe.org, Goggle Groups, and Web TV users must request to be white
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Lights need to stay operational in the event of appliance overloading
(which can be fairly common), so it makes sense from that safety
perspective.

Also, when electricity was first introduced, I believe lighting was
the only application. Light wiring would have been low current
capacity, so when higher current power points were added later it was
most likely essential to put them on a new separate circuit.
And hence it remained for ever more.

Dave.

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Cheers Dave.

PS dont you, pa & some of the other regulars here ever go to sleep!



Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?
Quoted text here. Click to load it

The Australian wiring rules require that there be (at least) two
circuits for lighting and two for GPOs.

Main reason is safety. So you're not left in the dark, and you have
always have some power.

Lighting circuits not only have lower current rating fuses but also
lower current rated wire.

Earth wiring has to be supplied to light fittings whether the lights
need an earth connection or not.

Safety is everything in the wiring rules. Wiring rules were initiated by
  insurance companies.

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not true under current rules, and never has been.

The old rules strongly encouraged at least two power circuits in
domestic installations, by severely limiting the number of GPOs (as they
were called in those days) allowed for an installation with only one
circuit, but it was not compulsory.

New rules (AS/NZS3000:2007) leave it to the designer and cover it under
the General Design of an Electrical Installation : Rule 1.6.1 (d) -
minimize inconvenience in the event of a fault, and Rule 1.6.5 - Every
electrical installation shall be divided into circuits as necessary to -
(a) avoid danger and minimize inconvenience in the event of a fault; and
(b) facilitate safe operation, inspection, testing and maintenance.


There has never been a requirement for at least two lighting circuits.

David

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

  You're the first to mention *inconvenience* (as well as danger) when losing
power.

  I never bought the safety bullshit angle.  We've lost power due to blackouts
numerous times, and the ONLY safety issue was getting bored to death by lack
of television, and lately, perhaps lack of a computer and internet connection.
  Complete blackouts aren't unheard of, even some of the more major *cities*
here in Australia still have regular blackouts (even if that IS another story).

  I don't know about others, but I have torches within easy reach of a couple
of rooms.
  I still don't buy the safety bullshit angle.  What's going happen?  Some old
fart will fall over in the dark?  Or is it a surprise the old fart didn't keel
over when they stuck their knife in the toaster which caused the power loss in
the first place?


  Or have they never heard of candles and kerosine lamps like they used to use
in the 'olde days before electrickery?
  Or is the safety angle just that?  The risk of fire of candles and kerosine
lamps the reason everyone says electricity is "safe"?
  Though, it HAS been nearly two entire generations since kero lamps have
vanished, and candles have been redelagated to the task of aromatherapy.

  That's like saying it's safe to use wired electricity in the house because
cave people used to light indoors fires and burn their bloody caves down.

--
Linux Registered User # 302622
<http://counter.li.org

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Current rules require at least two RCDs in a domestic installation
(unless there is only one circuit). Also, to mimimize the impact of an
operation of a single RCD, a maximum of three final sub circuits shall
be protected by one RCD, and lighting circuits shall be distributed
between RCDs


Quoted text here. Click to load it

And will only get more frequent, with no new power stations being built
in NSW.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If there is a danger, you could fit battery operated emergency lights.
These are required in most public and non residential buildings.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

David




Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

  No matter, there is more than enough work in this area on for everyone
concerned when it comes to the rest of the country.  And around the world...

Quoted text here. Click to load it


  When the government can fund and fit those #%&!^# CFLs to everyone's place,
all for no more than single digit percentage savings, why can't they supply a
cheap torch (with batteries supplied!!) and really improve things?
--
Linux Registered User # 302622
<http://counter.li.org

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

"John Tserkezis"


** This loon posts straight out of a mental asylum  -   easy to see that.

    Wot a psycho.



Quoted text here. Click to load it




Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?
Quoted text here. Click to load it

You are correct about the Wiring Regulations. It's actually a state rule
for Western Australia, also for public buildings such as theatres and
halls the lighting can't all be off one phase.

Re: Why are lights & GPO's on different circuits?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The reason is just so that if something shorts out/dies you don't loose your
lights. This goes back to the 1800's when motors and heaters would routinely
short out.



Site Timeline