When chosing your next bug zapper.

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
http://www.integralmemoryplc.com/news/integral-led-support-study-university-bristol


Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Facinating. The articles mention that heat may be the main factor in
artificial lights attracting insects, but the paper itself also
mentions that UV radiation may be a large factor in the difference
between LED and CFL globes, with heat only being used as an
explaination for the high bug attraction of the UV-low filament
globes.

It may be worth noting that the researchers performed tests
away from any structures, while in common use an occupied
building with the light inside or nearby may already be
sufficiently heated for the purpose of comfort, such that the
significance of the heat from a filament light bulb in attracting
insects is less significant than when it's in the middle of a
field.

It would have been interesting if they'd also tested a halogen
light bulb, as these produce both lots of heat, and much larger
amounts of UV radiation than the other light bulb types tested.
Particularly if the now common UV blocking glass is not used.

--  
__          __
#_ < |\| |< _#

Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.
Once upon a time on usenet Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Data paid for and massaged by a company selling LED lighting solutions.  
Obviously the person who wrote "As lighting manufacturers, we welcome that a  
link between LED lights and low attraction to insects has been proven."  
hasn't worn a powerful LED headlamp on a night when there are lots of flying  
insects around. I almost have to wear safety glasses some times as they  
kamikaze their way down the light beam in a powered dive...
--  
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy  
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Aus got mostly Nips in the war - on my hemisphere the critters have mostly  
Swastikas................

An old solar garden light bug zapper I autopsied had blue LEDs, there were  
some insects stuck to the wire grid - I put the low death toll down to the  
limited time the inverter could run on a UK days sunlight.  


Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.
Once upon a time on usenet Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Like the ones on the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive-bomber?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah, a solar zapper is a big ask on its own (unless it costs over a hundred  
quid) without being in a low-sunlight area.
--  
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy  
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Possibly the most useless (after anything the French stuck wings on)  
military aircraft ever built.

It was a great terror weapon for spearheading a blitzkrieg, but if they  
didn't have air superiority the Stuka was a dead easy target.

The Jap zero was an unpleasant surprise for the allies, but for range and  
manouverability it had pretty much no armor. As soon as allied airforces  
developed a buddy system to trap them in a turn, the problem was  
substantially neutralised.  


Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

They did cite other studies indicating the attraction of bugs to
UV light, which LED globes do produce less of. I think they also
mentioned other tests between CFL and LED globes (one in NZ, if I
remember correctly from my breif look yesterday). Given how much
brighter many new LED torches are compared to old filament ones
it may be that the sheer quantity of light is making up for it's
less bug-attractive nature.

I suppose I'm actually in a rather good position to try to
replicate the experiment. Maybe one day...

--  
__          __
#_ < |\| |< _#

Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.
On 28/02/2017 7:52 AM, Computer Nerd Kev wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Whenever I look at the output spectrum of a 'white' LED, I see this big  
spike just at the top of the violet end.  That is what drives the  
phosphor producing the white light.  If insects are attracted to  
near-UV, that is exactly the right place.

And judging with my experience with head torches while camping, I would  
say LEDs are worse than filament lamps for attracting insects, of course  
the total light output is also a factor, as has already been mentioned.



--  
Regards,

Adrian Jansen

Re: When chosing your next bug zapper.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

AFAIK: the usual white LEDs are blue with a yellow phosphor, I've heard  
rumours about UV LEDs with a white phosphor that are claimed to be more  
efficient.  


Site Timeline