Wall Mounting Flat screen TV's

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    I have a flat screen LCD TV that I want to mount on the wall. There are
no power points where I want to put it so my first thought was to put
the power point behind the TV. Because of the depth of the mains Plug
and Socket, it means that I will have to pack out the mounting. This is
the easiest solution, but it will make the mounting and the packing
visible when you walk into the room. I'm sure I am not the first one to
come up against this problem so I'm wondering if others have found a
solution.
    It is possible to buy special recessed sockets in the US which allow
the plug and socket to be below the wall surface (they are called Clock
Boxes),but I cannot locate anything like it in Australia. Perhaps
someone will know of something similar. See:
http://powerbridgesolution.com/home.html
http://www.hometheaterblog.com/images/2006/05/clockbox.jpg

    How were the cables hidden when you wall mounted your Plasma or LCD TV?

DD

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Why not pack it out - are you that starved for room-space or taken in by the
"ultra-slim-TV-is-an-end-in-itself" theorum ?

One way would be to hard-wire the power cable into a flush plate like a
fixed heater outlet.

Also, strongly suggest you mock up a tempoary mount where you plan to have
it, and trial for a bit. This is because everybody I know who has mounted a
TV on a wall has regretted the height it is at, and wished they had it back
down at 'console' level, ie looking straight from a lounge chair - not
upwards.

geoff



Re: Wall Mounting Flat screen TV's


    I don't want to pack it out from the wall because the flat screen we
already have stands quite a way from the wall. When you enter the room
by a door on the same wall as the TV, you can see all the wires and
brackets it's just not neat!
    I don't think that hard wiring would be legal, that is a possibility
that I will investigate.
    As we already have wall mounted TV's, the height is well defined but I
do agree, the most common mistake is to mount it too high.

DD





On 27/05/10 9:50 PM, geoff wrote:
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So build a wood/gyrock surround for it.
A quick trip to Bunnings, a few bits of dressed pine, a few nice cuts, some
construction adhesive and a coat of paint and you'll have a nice surround
around any existing screen mount. You won't even have to remove the screen,
just glue the bits around it.
(beware ventilation issues)

Dave.

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    I had thought of something like you describe. I guess you wouldn't like
to do the job?

DD


On 28/05/10 12:32 PM, David L. Jones wrote:
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Sure, my wood work construction rate is double my engineering consulting
rate though because I have to actually get my hands dirty.

No need to think about it much, just do it. Get some dressed pine, slap it
together, paint it, and hold it in place to see how you like it before you
glue or otherwise fix it to the wall. Only rudimentary wood working skills
and tools required.

Dave.

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Re: Wall Mounting Flat screen TV's





Thanks again for your interest! What I have done is cut a template of
the TV and attached it to the wall where I hope to put it. I will give
it a week or so while the cables are organised and by then I should be
certain. It is going in the bedroom so that we can sit in bed to watch
TV or a DVD. My wife has a bad back and cannot sit for very long.
    I am not afraid of the carpentry, I have done things with wood all my
life and I have a really good toolkit. Perhaps I will have to decline
your kind offer, you sound very expensive!!

DD



On 29/05/10 1:36 PM, David L. Jones wrote:
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We placed the bedroom telly in the fitted cupboards at rooms end (32"),
at night simply open and view hence a normal cable and plug was used
witha cheap wall mount

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    Unfortunately, no cupboards!

DD

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They were not there when we took the house , a few bucks and a days work
fixed that

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cut a hole in the gyprock and mount a switch mounting box with its back
against the side of a stud then mount the socket in that.



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Side entry plug?

e.g. http://www.dse.co.nz/dse.shop/en/product/M7013

<had to go to dickless as the hpm site shows a standard plug>

These are actually what I use when I chomp IEC power cords to cut the
cable tangle.

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If it is a gyprock wall just mount an ordinary outlet on it and use a
side entry plug, these will fit easily behind most brackets.
If it is a brick wall it is possible to cut, drill,chisel a recess and
fit a wall box to allow flush mounting of the outlet.
The clock plug and socket is available in aus but it is used on
lighting circuit usually as the current rating is not suitable for
normal power outlets.

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    I always use the side entry plugs when I have fixed appliances, I think
they look the best and don't get in the way so much.
    The wall is Gyprock but a standard outlet and side entry plug is still
too thick. The mounting bracket I want to use is only 12mm off the back
of the TV! There is a recess in the back of the TV where all the
input/output plugs are sited and I intend to position the plug and
socket to line up with this. I still need some clearance so that any
ancillary plugs do not interfere.
    The TV is only rated at 115 watts so maybe the lighting clockbox will
be legal, I will have to investigate...

DD



On 28/05/10 1:34 AM, F Murtz wrote:
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I looked at recessed power point adaptors, but they were too big to fit
in the holes in the Jaycar mounting plate that I used. In the end I
bought a thinner than usual power point from Cetnaj and mated it with a
side entry plug. I got a similar plate for the antenna socket, I thought
that I would need a right angle adaptor for it but there was just enough
clearance for a standard Belling-Lee plug.

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    Where oh where did you see the recessed power point adaptors?

DD


    On 28/05/10 11:44 AM, keithr wrote:
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Cetnaj Coffs Harbour, but they were big clumsy looking things. They were
just a shell into which you mount a standard socket plate.

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I have e-mailed Cetnaj for details...

DD

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Why not see if you can find a low profile plug, like the ones often used on
pwr boards etc where the cord enters the plug from the side rather than
entering from behind. Mmmm, that just doesnt sound right does it.


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It's a wonder Clipsal and HPM marketing gurus haven't come across these
and duplicated them for OZ use.

I assume it is a plug together affair, between bottom and top modules,
like an extension cord. If it is, then no electrical wiring would be
required, and could be manufactured as an approved product, that Aunty
Mabel can install. (Well, providing she has basic handyman skills. The
sort of girl that can lay a few bricks).

The day will come when you can hang up a large screen in much the same
way as you would hang a large glazed picture. It is only a weight
problem this decade. :-)

Cheers Don...



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Don McKenzie

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