using natural gas to generate electricity - Page 2

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
Re: using natural gas to generate electricity

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's a very interesting building. I had no idea what cogeneration was.
This is more or less where my "invention" was heading in my head.

The electricity factories burn coal, and are probably around 50% efficient
at best (I bet its more like 40). The waste heat is dumped into lakes and
ponds. Google Hazelwood pondage in Melbourne, I waterski there during
winter! The lake is heated by the adjacent power factory, and is too hot to
use in summer.

So when we heat our houses with electricity, after conversion from coal,
then transmission losses, we are probably only using 20% of the original
energy found in the original coal. In many ways we are much less efficient
at heating our houses than the poorest houses in China, where they use coal
directly in the home. That's a pretty sad fact.

The issue of noise and pollution is nothing. My math shows that a single V6
engine is enough for a group of 10 to 20 houses. A suitably built and
suitably placed generator will be less noisy than passing cars on the roads
outside. Cars are very quiet these days. All I hear from the road outside is
tyre and wind noise, I only hear engine noise from older cars.












Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Environmentalism rarely makes economic sense.

Quoted text here. Click to load it





Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
dont  forget  the load turning a generator  is  minimal  compared to
lugging aroundover a ton of steel .



Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Then you are just idling the engine. Ideally you set the engine revs at
the maximum efficency, then gear the generator to run at the required
cycles, also chosing the right size (power) generator. We are not
talking about sing the car alternator here.

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Has anyone considering this done the math on cost of gas through the
25% efficiency of the motor and compared that to electricity charges?

If you could a) suck enough gas to run a motor, b) easily generate own
power, c) make an ROI, don't you think Honda and other generator makers
would be tapping this market to sell generator sets running off gas?

Do you recall any motors running off propane bottles?  Where they're
used?  Why?

Grant.

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Large scale, plenty of underground coal mines look at it and quite a few
have high enough gas concentrations in their exhaust vents to do so.
A few rubbish pits have now also been tapped for gas powered generation.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

At one stage, it home-bloke wanted to used LPG, you purchased a petrol
powered generator and had it converted to lpg. It cost about $400

Now, you can buy a range of lpg powered generators. Do a web search.

Why? Petrol is explosive, hard to store, convenience, etc.

Note, i'm not the person promoting the enginer conversion.

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

yes.


a: standby generators, other standby uses
b: some forklifts

Quoted text here. Click to load it

a: the shelf-life of petrol is a few months unless kept in a sealed container.
b: not sure, perhaps it's cheaper?

--
⚂⚃ 100% natural

---

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
i wasnt talking about the  alternator either !!!

think :

say vn commodore v6 : unloaded  25 mpg (  i dont know correct figure, just
wild guess.)
now you know if you put a trailer on with 2 tonn steel and fill the inside
of car with steel, you  get 5 miles per gallon.

NOW IF YOU STRIP the car down , take boot/bonnet/ seats.  doors off etc..
your mileage will be say 30 mpg.

so turning a genererator will use  less power.

Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Wrong, depends on the size of of the generator or alternator and the
load on it.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
MMMM SO  THE LOAD  on a engine  FROM A CAR  ( 1 TON OR SO ) is  less than
turning a generator ??  ummm you are  COMPLETELY WRONG. !!!



Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

hahahahaha. Tske foot, open mouth, inser foot and chew.
Hint; how long is a piece of string?
Though I doubt you will get it.
<probably doesn't realise that generators come in various sizes>

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it


May be he is thinking of the cars small gen,alt.
You could put gens.alts. that overload motor or that underload motor

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I think with that poster you dont get his name and "think" in the same
sentence.


Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
you are all retarded .... the less load u pull the less energy u use u
imbociles/.



Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
looks like you dont get it cause you cannot comprehend  that it takes more
energy to  pull 1 tonne  than it does to pull 500 kg..


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah you are correct that it takes twice as much, but what you don't
get is that it takes no energy to "pull one tonne"
and twice nothing is still nothing.

Generators also turn with little mechanical resistance when there is no
electrical load connected. when you connect a electrical load the
mechanical load presented by the generator also increases.

Stepper mpotors (like you find inside junk inkjet printers and page
scanners) make neat little generators, get one, do some experiments.

--
⚂⚃ 100% natural

---

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it


I'm not an expert, but trust me generators are nasty things to deal
with. Peak loads, as with comercial generation is the main concern. Here
the mains power is dodgey and every block of units has a generator. To
provide enough power during peak times you need a large unit, which is
then not economical to run when loads are down. Daylight hours all you
are running are fridges and hot water. Night sees air-con, cooking and
almost every appliance the tenant can find to turn on. Not trying to
rain on your parade but this whole town runs on generators, sometimes
for weeks on end (2nd largest city in the country). The only guys that
benefit are the mechanics and sparkeys that make a killing on servicing
the noisy brutes.

--
Brad Leyden
6° 43.5816' S 146° 59.3097' E  WGS84
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: using natural gas to generate electricity

"Mr Mac"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

** Completely nuts.

If you have gas available  -  then so do all your neighbours.

They will already be using it DIRECTLY it for hot water, cooking and home
heating  - which are the 3 major consumers of energy in a home.  Only their
fridges, CFL lights and small appliances use electricity -  plus air con if
they have any.

Gas homes generally have rather small electric bills.

BTW:

Gas appliances are rather inefficient as much waste heat energy goes up
flues etc.


....  Phil



Re: using natural gas to generate electricity
Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's a bit like buying a PC and calling yourself an ISP.

Re: using natural gas to generate electricity

Quoted text here. Click to load it
<Snip>
Quoted text here. Click to load it
I had a similar idea on a much smaller scale ie convert one of those
small el cheapo generators from Bunnings to run on natural gas and use
it for backup during power outages.

Suspect this may not be possible as they are 2 strokes so presumably
lubrication would be a problem?

Anyway, as I would have to pay someone to do the conversion, I imagine
this would be a really bad idea financially.

Dave Goldfinch