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Re: TVs and warranty??



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With multiple dry joints, you'd have had a case to have it repaired at
no cost even after the warranty expired, because dry joints are a
manfacturing fault, not the result of wear and tear or the passage of time.

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Re: TVs and warranty??



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believe my
reacted
time.

And just how many consumers would know what the fault is, and be able to
prove it.
Not many manufacturers are going to admit it is a manufacturing fault once
the warranty has expired.
Having a case is one thing, getting satisfaction something else entirely.

MrT.




Re: TVs and warranty??



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I don't know, but the previous poster said that it involved multiple dry
  joints. If he had got it repaired at his own expense, and the repairer
stated the the repair involved the correction of numerous dry joints,
then that would be a sufficient case to recover the cost of the repair
from the manufacturer, importer or retailer.

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That's what small-claims tribunals/courts are for.

Sylvia.
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Re: TVs and warranty??


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  usually the small claims are used in a vexatious manner to avoid
payment or make and tenuous claim regarding goods or services ,
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Re: TVs and warranty??



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That's as maybe. It's not what they're for.

Sylvia.
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Re: TVs and warranty??


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  Semantics  , it's what they are used for in a high proportion of cases.
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Re: TVs and warranty??



..
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Run your own small business do you?

My experience is the opposite, many businesses will laugh at you and hope it
is too much trouble for you to go through the process of getting a judgement
against them, *AND* enforcing it, no matter how much in the wrong they are.

It usually depends on whether you get paid up front or not. I'm assuming you
don't.
The rule of law is, the one trying to get the money always has a tougher job
than the one holding it, regardless of their case.

MrT.



Re: TVs and warranty??


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I take revenge by telling all and sundry that TEAC is not a good brand.

Years ago I got a TEAC CD player too, and it went bung. The repair people
said they turned the laser up. It has worked reasonably, with the odd
hiccup, ever since.

and I have learned my lesson. Avoid TEAC.  things ought not break lie this.



--
ant
Don't try to email me;
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Re: TVs and warranty??


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Last Teac we had died three times in 5 years , I was sick of replcing
caps in the power supply so bought some cheap chinese 86 cm for the bed
room and an Lg rear pro for the living room , gave the teac to a woman I
detested :)

Re: TVs and warranty??



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If it's not under warranty, they don't tell you that, unless they are not an
approved service agent, and they don't get on with the manufacturer anyway.
Besides the repairers often like to make extra profit on the supply of spare
parts, whether they are needed or not.

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If you are prepared to fight long and hard maybe.

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once
entirely.

Yep, still waiting for a payment the DFT promised me I would get six months
ago.
Good luck.

MrT.



Re: TVs and warranty??



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Anyone with a clue and a decent online database of common
problems with particular models with this sort of problem.

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You dont need to prove it with the small claims system, just assert
that and wave around the stuff off the net and fuck them over.

It wouldnt come to that anyway, once the manufacturer realises
that you know about the problem that model is notorious for,
they'll cave in rather than waste their time with the small claims
system which is quite biased in favor of the consumer in that situation.

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Wrong when they know that the small claims system will fuck them over.

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Wrong, as always. You just need to know that that model is notorious for that.



Re: TVs and warranty??



"Sylvia Else"


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** Dead wrong  -  as usual.

The term "dry joint " is commonly used in electronics to refer to all manner
of cracked and heat damaged joints made with solder.  Fractured or heat
fatigued cracked would be better descriptions but " dry joint "is the one
most often used.

These defects develop as the result of time, high temperature, vibration and
thermal cycling of the device.

Electronic components and all the fancy devices made from them begin
deteriorating from the minute they are made  -  so, in that sense, the seeds
of self destruction are  *ALL*  built in at the factory.

Makers are not obliged to warranty against the consequences of this.



.........    Phil



Re: TVs and warranty??


On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 14:58:24 +1000, Phil Allison wrote: ......
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......
The term "dry joint" refers to a incorrectly soldered connection that
actually looks "dry" compared to the (usually) shiny "wet" look of a
correctly soldered connection.

A "dry joint" can be caused by things like oxidised or insufficiently
clean components, inadequate whetting flux during the soldering process,
incorrect temperature or just bad technique.

"Dry joints" are invariably bad whether there is any heat subsequently
affecting the joint, but any expansion/contraction caused by localised
heat sources can exacerbate any problems.

--
Regards, David.

David Clayton, e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@XYZ.myrealbox.com
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Re: TVs and warranty??



"David Clayton"

Phil Allison wrote: ......
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  **  See above.

  Anyone can Google a term and get half the story.




.......   Phil






Re: TVs and warranty??



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You're arguing about the meaning of words.

Is solder used much in toasters?

Sylvia.

Re: TVs and warranty??



"Sylvia Else"

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** Dead wrong  -  as usual.

The term "dry joint " is commonly used in electronics to refer to all manner
of cracked and heat damaged joints made with solder.  Fractured or heat
fatigue cracked would be better descriptions but " dry joint "is the one
most often used.

These defects develop as the result of time, high temperature, vibration and
thermal cycling of the device.

Electronic components and all the fancy devices made from them begin
deteriorating from the minute they are made  -  so, in that sense, the seeds
of self destruction are  *ALL*  built in at the factory.

Makers are not obliged to warranty against the consequences of this.




.........    Phil




Re: TVs and warranty??



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I was learning NASA high-reliability soldering techniques 20 years before
Google existed.

--
Regards, David.

David Clayton, e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@XYZ.myrealbox.com
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Re: TVs and warranty??


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Good for you!

Well done ...

--
Craig

Re: TVs and warranty??


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Wrong, as always.

A TV shouldnt be developing dry joints in that time, or in 15 years either.



Re: TVs and warranty??



"Rod Speed"
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**  Compete fact,  as always.


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** A well designed set should not develop *cracked solder joints* within
it's expected life time.

    But that is not 15 years.





.......   Phil






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